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Gift of 



Mr, Tate Holt 




STANFORD UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES 





^^^'^ 



THE 



WAR OF THE REBELLION: 



A COMPILATION OF THE 



OFFICIAL RECORDS 



UNION AND CONFEDERATE ARMIES. 



PUBL18HKD UNDKU THK DIKKCTION OV 

The Hon. BLIHXT ROOT, Secretary of War, 

BY 

BRIG. GEN. FRED C. AINSWORTH. 

CHUEV of THK RrCORD AMD PkMBION OkKICX, WaR DBPARTMXm'y 

AND 

MR. JOSEPH W. KIRKLEY. 



8EHIS8 m— ▼OLirilS ▼. 



WASHINGTON: 

GOYEBNMBNT PRINTING OFFIOB. 
1900. 



THE REPUBLICATION, in its entirety, of the War of 
the Rebellion: Official Records of the Union and Confederate 
Armies, is a service project undertaken by the National Historical 
Society in the interest of libraries and scholars who have long 
needed a reissue of this indispensable work. Each of the 128 
volumes is published in full, including the Index, and all are heavUy 
bound in buckram for long and continued use. This and other 
volumes of the set are available only from the National Historical 
Society. 




Copyright O 1971 by 

THE NATIONAL HISTORICAL SOCIETY 

Gettyiburg, Pa. 17325 
Printed at the Telegraph Press, Cameron & Kelker Sts., Harrisbuig, Pa. 



The National Historical Society seeks to expand and enrich knowl- 
edge of the American past and, through its programs and services, 
to bring its members a fuUer appreciation and deeper understanding 
of the people and events that came together to create the great his- 
tory that is our heritage. 



PREFACE 



ITie work of preparing the records of the war for public use was 
began, under the resolution of Congress of May 19, 1864, by Col. £. D. 
Townsend, assistant adjutant-general, U. S. Army (then in charge 
of the Adjutant-General's Office, and subsequently the Adjutant- 
General), who caused copies to be made of reports of battles on file 
in his office and steps to be taken to collect missing records. 

Under the provisions of joint resolution of July 27, 1866, Hon. Peter 
H. Watson was appointed to supervise the preparation of the records 
and to formulate a plan for their publication, but he performed no 
service under this appointment, which expired July 27, 1868, by limi- 
tation. This resolution having also repealed the former one, the 
project was suspended for the time being. 

The first decisive step taken was the act of June 23, 1874, providing 
the necessary means ** to enable the Secretary of War to begin the 
publication of the Official Records of the War of the Rebellion, boUi 
of the Union and Confederate Armies," and directing him ^' to have 
copied for the Public Printer all i-eports, letters, telegrams, and gen- 
eral orders, not heretofore copied or printed, and properly arranged 
in chronological order." Appropriations have been made from time 
to time for continuing such preparation. Under this act the pi*elimi- 
nar}' work was resumed by General Townsend. 

Suliseqaently, under meager appropriations, it was prosecuted in 
a somewhat desultory manner by various subordinates of the War 
Department until December 14, 1877, when the Secretary of War, 
perceiving that the undertaking needed the undivided attention of 
a single head, detailed Capt. Robert N. Scott, Third U. S. Artillery 
(subseq^uently major and lieutenant-colonel same I'egiment), to take 
charge of the office. 

The act of June 23, 1874, enlarged upon the first scheme of publi- 
cation. On this more comprehensive basis it was determined that the 
volumes should include not only the battle reports, correspondence, 
etc., in possession of the War Department, but also " all official docu- 
ments that can be obtained by the compiler, and that appear to be of 
any historical value." C^olonel Scott systematized the work, and, 
upon his recommendation, the Secretary of War approved the follow- 
ing order of publication : 

The first series wiU embrace the formal reports, both Union and Confederate, 
of the first seizures of United States property in the Southern States, and of all 
military operations in the field, with the corresjwndence, orders, and returns 
relating specially thereto, and, as iiroposed, is to be accompanied by an Atlas. 

Ill 



IV PREFACE. 

In this series the reports will be arranged according to the campaigns and sev- 
eral theaters of operations (in the chronological order of events) , and the Union 
reports of any event will, as a rule, be immediately followed by the Confederate 
accounts. The correspondence, etc., not embraced in the *' reports*' proper will 
follow (first Union and next Confederate) in chronological order. 

The second series will contain the correspondence, orders, reports, and returns. 
Union and Confederate, relating to prisoners of war, and (so far as' the military 
authorities were concerned) to state or political prisoners. 

The third series will contain the correspondence, orders, reports, and returns of 
the Union authorities (embracing their corresjKjndence with the Confederate oflS.- 
cials) not relating specially to the subjects of the first and second series. It will 
set forth the annual and special reports of the Secretary of War, of the General- 
in-Chief, and of the chiefs of the several staff corx>8 and departments ; the calls 
for troojw, and the correspondence between the National and the several State 
authorities. 

The fourth series will exhibit the correspondenc^e, orders, reports, and returns 
of the Confederate authorities, similar to that indicated for the Union oflBcials, 
as of the third series, but excluding the correspondence between the Union and 
Confederate authorities given in that series. 

The first volume of the recoi-ds was issued in the early fall of 1880. 
The act approved June 1(), 1880, provided ''for the printing and bind- 
ing, under direction of the Secretary of War, of 10,000 copies of a com- 
pilation of the Official Records (Union and Confederate) of the War of 
the Rebellion, so far as the same may be ready for publication, during 
the fiscal year ; " and that ' * of said number 7, (XX) copies shall be for the 
use of the House of Representatives, 2,(X)0 copies for th^ use of the 
Senate, and 1,(X)0 copies for the use of the Executive Departments." 
Under this act Colonel Scott proceeded to publish the first five volumes 
of the i^ecords.* 



*A11 subsequent volumes have been distributed uhder the act approved August 
7, 1882, which provides that : 

'* The volumes of the Official Records of tl>e War of the Rebellion shall he dis- 
tributed as follows : One thousand copies to the Executive Departments, as now 
provided by law. One thousand copies for distribution by the Secretary of War 
among officers of the Army and contributors to the work. Eight thousand three 
hundred copies shall be sent by the Secretary of War to such libraries, organiza- 
tions, and individuals as may be designated by the Senators, Rei)resentative8, and 
Delegates of the Forty -seventh Congress. £2ach Senator shall designate not exceed- 
ing twenty-six, and each Representative and Delegate not exceeding twenty-one, of 
such addresses, and the volumes shall be sent thereto from time to time as they are 
published , until the publication is completed. Senators , Representatives , and Dele- 
gates shall inform the Secretary of War in each case how many volumes of those 
heretofore published they have forwarded to such addresses. The remaining copies 
of the eleven thousand to be imblished. and all sets that may not l>e ordered to be 
distributed as provided herein, shall be sold by the Secretary of War for cost of 
publication with ten per cent, added thereto, and the proceeds of such sale shall be 
covered into the Treasury. If two or more sets of said volumes are ordered to the 
same address, the Secretary of War shall inform the Senators, Representatives, or 
Delegates who liave designated the same, who thereui)on may designate other 
libraries, organizations, or individuals. The Si'cretary of War shall report to the 
first session of the Forty-eighth Congress what volumes of the series heretofore 
published have not been furnished to sut-li li])r:iri('s. organizations, and individuals. 
He shall also inform distributees at whose instance the volumes are sent." 



PREFACE. V 

Colonel Scott died March 5, 1887. At his death some twentj'-six 
books only had been issued, but he had compiled a large amount of 
matter for forthcoming volumes; consequently his name as compiler 
was retained in all the books up to and including Vol. XXXVI, 
Hhhongh his successors had added largelj' to his compilations from 
new material found after his demise. 

The Secretar^^- of War, May 7, 1887, assigned Lieut. Col. H. M. Lazelle, 
Twenty-third V. S. Infantry, to duty as the successor of Colonel Scott. 
He had continued in charge alK)ut two years, when, in the act approved 
March 2, 1880, it was provided— 

That hereafter the preparation and publication of said records shall be conducted, 
under the Secretary of War, by a board of three persons, one of whom shall be 
an oiBcer of the Army, and two civilian exi)erts, to be appointed by the Secretary of 
War,thecompenaationof said civilian experts to be fixed by the Secretary of War. 

The Secretarj' of War appointed Maj. George B. Davis, judge-advo- 
cate, U. S. Army, as the railitarj' member, and Leslie J. Perry, of Kan- 
sas, and Joseph W. Kirkley, of Maryland, as the ci\ilian expert mem- 
bers of said board. The board assumed direction of the publication 
at the commencement of the fiscal j^ear 1889, its first work l)eginning 
with Serial No. 36 of Vol. XXIV. 

July 1, 1895, by direction of the Secretary of War, Maj. George W. 
Davis, Eleventh U. S. Infantry (subsequently lieutenant-colonel Four- 
teenth U. S. Infantry), relieved Maj. George B. Davis as themilitarj' 
member and president of the Board of Publication. Subsequently 
CoL Fred C. Ainsworth, Chief of the Record and Pension Office, War 
Department, was appointed the military member and president of the 
board, relieving Lieut. Col. George W. Davis June 1, 1898. 

December 1, 1898, under the provision of the sundrj- civil act of 
July 1, 1898, relative to the War Records Office, the Board of Publi- 
cation wtis dissolved, whereupon, by direction of the Secretar}- of 
War, the continuance of the work, l)eginning with Vol. VI, Series II, 
devolved on Colonel (now Brigadier-Greneral) Ain.sworth. 

By operation of law (contained in "An act making appropriations 
for the legislative, executive, and judicial exjH^nses of the Govern- 
ment for the fiscal 3'ear ending June 30, 19(X)," approved February 24, 
I^IK^), the War Records Office was merged into the Record and Pen- 
sion Office, July 1, 1899, and since that date the work of publication 
has been conducted under the supervision of the chief of that office. 

Each volume includes a copious index, and for the further conven- 
ience of invest igatora there will be, in addition, a separate general 
index to the entire set. 

Nothing is printed in these volumes except duly authenticated con- 
temporaneous records of the war. The scope of the compiler's work 
in to decide xipou and arrange the matter to Ik* published ; to correct 
and verify the orthography of tlie i)apers used, and, wherever deemed 
mM*i\ssjirv, It) ;i<ld a foot-note of explanation. 



CONTENTS. 



OofTespcmdenoe, Orders, etc., from Kay 1, 1865, to the end*. 1-1048 



Tn 



1865. 


1866. 






■ 


>. 
















X 










>. 


1 


>. 


1 

1 


1 
1 


>* 


^ 

A 




! 


1 


1 


! 


1 


X 


1 


Jan 


1 
8 


1 
2 i 3 
9 1 10 


4 
11 


5 
12 


6 
13 


7 
14 


Jan 




1 
8 


2 
9 


s 

10 


4 

11 


5 
12 


6 
18 




7 




16 


16 ; 17 


18 


19 


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14 


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22 


23 ' 24 


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21 


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27 


Feb 


29 


80 i 81 










Feb 


28 


29 


SO 


31 








1 
8 


2 
9 


3 
10 


4 
11 


1 
8 


2 
9 


8 
10 




5 


6 i 7 




4 


5 


6 


7 




12 


13 14 


15 


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11 


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13 


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25 




18 


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20 


21 


22 


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24 


JHarclft ... 


26 


27 28 










ISarcb . . . 


25 


26 


27 


28 








1 
8 


2 
9 


S 
10 


4 
11 


1 
8 


2 
9 


8 
10 




5 


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4 


5 


6 


7 




12 


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29 


SO 


31 






25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


80 


31 


April 














i 


ApHl .... 


1 


? 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 




2 


3 4 


5 


6 


7 


^ 1 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 




9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 




15 1 16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 




16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 1 




22 1 23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


nmy 


23 
SO 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29' 
1 


Alaj 


29 1 30 












I 


2 
9 


3 
10 


4 
11 


5 
12 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 




6, 7 




7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13*' 


13 14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 




14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 11 


20 , 21 


22 


28 


24 


25 


26 


June 


21 

28 


22 
29 


23 
30 


24 

31 


25 


26 


27 
' June 


27 1 28 


29 


SO 


31 






1 
8 
15 


2 
9 
16 


1 
8 


2 
9 


3 i 


3 4 


5 
12 


6 
13 


7 
14 




4 


5 1 6 


7 


10 




10 


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11 


12 1 13 


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21 


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28 


29 


SO 




25 


26 1 27 


28 


29 


80 





Jnly 


1 


2 


S 


4 


5 


6 


7 


Jnly 












1 
8 




8 9 
15 16 


10 
17 


11 

18 


12 
19 


13 
20 


14 
21 




2 


3 1 4 


5 


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7 




9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 




22 , 23 


24 


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26 


27 


28 




16 
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24 


18 
25 


•i? 


20 
27 


21 

28 


22 
29 


Ani^st . . 


29 , SO 


31 










1 


2 


3 


4 


Aui^nst .. 


30 


31 














5 . 6 


7 
14 
21 


8 
15 
22 


9 
16 
23 


10 
17 
24 


11 

1« 
25 


1 
8 


2 
9 


3 
10 


4 

11 


5 
12 


12 
19 


13 
20 




6 


7 




13 


14 ! 15 


16 


17 


18 


19 ': 


AW 


27 


28 


29 


SO 


31 






20 


21 22 


23 


24 


25 


26 . Sent 














1 


Sept 


27 


28 i 29 


30 


31 




..... 


i 


2 . 3 
9 10 

16 17 


4 

11 

18 


5 
12 
19 


6 
13 
20 


7 
14 
21 


8 
15 
22 


1 
8 






3 


'4:5 


6 


7 


9 






10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 




23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 




17 
24 


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25 


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26 


20 

27 


21 
28 


22 
29 


23 
30 


October . 


30 














1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


October. . 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 




7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 




8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 




14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 




i:. 


16 


17 


IH 


19 


20 


21 




21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


Nov 


22 
29 


23 i 24 
30 1 31 


25 


26 


27 


28 


Nov 


28 


29 


30 


31 








1 
8 
15 


2 
9 
16 


3 
10 
17 


1 
8 


2 
9 


3 
10 


4 

11 




4 


5 


6 
13 


7 
14 




f) 


6 - 7 


11 12 




12 


13 14 


15 


16 


17 


18 




18 ' 19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 




19 


20 21 


22 


23 


24 


25 




25 1 26 


27 


28 


29 


30 




Dec 


26 


27 28 


29 


30 






Dec 












1 
8 
15 


1 
8 


2 
9 




2 1 3 


4 

11 


5 
12 


6 
13 


7 
14 




3 


4 


5 


■ 6 


7 


9 


10 




10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 




16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 




17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


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25 


26 


27 


28 


29 




21 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 




30 


31 














81 






























1 











SERIES III.- VOL. V. 



CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, REPORTS, AND RETURNS OP 
THE UNION AUTHORITIES FROM MAY 1, 1865, TO THE 
END.* 

General. Orders, I War Dept., Adjt. General's Office, 

No. 79. f Washington, May 7, 1S65. 

for reducing the number of general, field, and staff offi- 
cers. 

It is ordered by the President that resignations of general, field, 
and staff officers will be received until the 15th of this month, at 
which date the Adjutant-General is directed to commence mustering 
honorably out of service all general, field, and staff officers who are 
unemployed, or whose service is no longer needed. 
By order of the President of the United States: 

W. A. NICHOLS, 
Asifistant AdjiUant- General, 



War Department, Adjutant-General's Office, 

Washington, May i, 1S66, 

(For the Honorable Secretary of War.) 

outline of method for the muster out and discharge from 
service of the volunteer armies of the united states. 

I. Army corps, or at least the divisions thereof, to be kept intact 
and ordered to convenient points, depending upon the armies to which 
they belong — say, Old Point Comfort, Washington, Cumberland, 
Nashville, Saint Louis, and such other places as may be designated. 

On arrival at said rendezvous a critical inspection of the regimental 
and company records to be made and the muster-out rolls prepared 
under the direction of the assistant commissaries of musters for divis- 
ions, superintended by the corps commissaries; corps commanders 
to see that the work is pushed with energy and executed promptly, 
nsing to this end division and brigade commanders to superintend it, 
and their respective staff officers to aid the mustering officers in col- 



*For all documents relating to the organization of troops on the Pacific Coast, 
&c., see Series I, Vol. L. 

(1) 
1 R R — SERIES III, VOL V 



2 COBBESFOKDEKCE, ETC. 

lecting the data for the mnster-out rolls and dischan^ papers, as well 
as the preparation of the same. 

II. The rolls and other final papers of a regiment completed, said 
command, with its arms, colors, and necessary equifMige, to be placed 
en route, generally to that point in the State where mustered in, there 
to be taken charge of by the chief mustering officer of tlvB State, and 
met by pajrmasters to make final payments. 

Whilst en route to the State a discreet and capable officer to be 
specially charged by the commissary of musters with the care of the 
muster-out roUs and regimental records. Immediately on arrival in 
the State the rolls and records to be turned over to the chief muster- 
'ing officer or his assistant at the point of rendezvous. After pay- 
ment of the troops the regimental and company records to be retained 
and carefully preserved by the State mustering officers, subject to the 
orders of the Adjutant-General of the Army. 

Whilst waiting payment the chief mustering officer to cause sub- 
sistence and other authorized supplies to be provided ; also to see that 
the command is kept together and under discipline. As soon as prac- 
ticable after the arrival of a regiment at the State rendezvous the 
chief mustering officer to have its arms and other public property 
tamed over to officers of the resi>ective supply departments; said 
officers to be designated by the departments concerned. 

The departure of regiments from the rendezvous where mustered 
out to be so regulated that regiments will not arrive more rapidly in 
their respective States than the Pay Department can pay them off. 

III. Under the foregoing the following advantages will be secured: 

1 . The entire force of commissaries and assistant commissaries of 
musters for troops in the field will be made available for the work, in 
connection with the chief and other State mustering officers. 

2. I'he most experienced mustering officers and those most familiar 
with the regimental records will be secured. 

3. The records from which the mustering-out data is to be obtained 
will be readily accessible, and the loss of re<lords (so common through 
the neglect of regimental officers) wliilst regiments are en route from 
the field to States can be avoided. 

4. Regimental officers can be held to a rigid accountability (by the 
corps, division, and brigade commanders) in preparing the records, 
and the interest of the enlisted man thus protected. 

5. Order and discipline can be maintained whilst troops are en 
route to States and after arrival therein. 

6. Troops can be comfortably cared for up to the moment they are 
paid off and i*eady to start for their homes. Dissatisfaction among 
them will be obviated, and cause for complaint by State authorities 
and citizens will be removed. 

7. All public property can be easily secured and properly accounted 
for. 

8. Regulations of the War Department now in force can be readily 
adapted to the musters out and discharge of the troops. 

Should the foregoing be approved, a general order can be framed, 
pointing to the necessary regulations and arranging requisite details. 
Respectfully submitted. 

THOMAS M. VINCENT, 
Assistant Adjutant- Qeneral, 

Memorandum. — Foregoing was for the consideration of the Sec- 
retary of War and lieutenant-general commanding Armies of the 



UKION AUTH0SITIE8. 8 

United States, at a meeting to which undersigned was called to consult 
as to disbanding the volonteer armies. Subject was briefly referred 
to in conversation; paper, however, not read. Secretary concluded 
by saying: '* Send the method to General Grant, and if approved by 
him issue the order." Time consumed in the consideration of subject 
did not extend beyond one hour and a half. 

T. M. V. 

Memorandum.] Adjutant-Gbnbral's Office, 

May 11, 1S65. 
Respectfully forwarded to Lieut. Gen. U. S. Grant, commanding 
Armies of the United States. 

This is the proposed method for mustera out which I spoke of to 
the Secretary of War whilst you were conversing with him on the 
subject. 

THOMAS M. VINCENT, 

Assistant AdjuiantrGerieral. 

[Indonement.] 

May 11, 1866. 
Plan and suggestions within approved. 

U. S. GRANT, 

Lieutenant' General, 



Lexington, Ky., May /, l8f>o. 
Orders No. 6.] 

On and after this date all recruiting of colored men in the Depart- 
ments of the Missouri and Arkansas and Military Divisions of the 
Mississippi and West Mississippi will cease. Volunteers will also not 
be accepted for white regiments within such limits. All recruiting 
officers will immediately join their respective commands for duty. 
Orders will subsequently be given for the consolidation of the incom- 
plete colored regiments and the muster out of service of all super- 
numerary officers. 
By order of the Secretary of War: 

L. THOMAS, 
Adjutant' Oeneral, 



Quartermaster-General's Office, 

Washington, D. C, May 2, 1866. 
Sir: As it is probable a large number of troops will soon be return- 
ing to their homes, the strictest attention should be given to prevent 
the use of any but perfectly safe transports, under exx)erienced and 
careful masters, provided with everything necessary for the safety and 
comfort of troops. Especial care should be taken to see that they are 
thoroughly clean and that they are not overloaded. The late calamity 
to the steamer Sultana shows the need of extreme caution whi^h will 
be expected from all officers in the management of river transportation. 
By order of the Quartermaster-General : 
Very re8i)ectf ully, 

LEWIS B. PARSONS, 
Colonel and Chief of Rail and River Transportation. 



4 COBRESfUtf DSNCEf ETC. 

War Department, 
Washington City, May S, 1866. 

ORDER RESCINDING REGULiATIONS PROHIBITING THE EXPORTATION OF 
ARMS, AMMUNITION, HORSES, MULES, AND LIVE-STOCK« 

The Executive order of November 21, 1862, prohibiting the expor- 
tation of arms and ammunition from the United States, and the 
Executive order of May 13, 1863, prohibiting the exportation of horses, 
mules, and live-stock, being no longer required by public necessities, 
the aforesaid orders are hereby rescinded and annulled. 
By order of the President: 

EDWIN M. STANTON, 

Secretary of War, 

Circular.] War Dept., Adjutant-General's Office, 

Washington, May 3, ISOo. 
All. Chief Mustering Officers of Loyal States: 

Deserters who have reported, or who may yet report, under the Pres- 
ident's proclamation, promulgated in General Oiders, No. 35, current 
series, from this office, and not yet forwarded to their proper com- 
mands, will be mustered out and discharged the service, with forfeit- 
ure of all pay and allowances due at date of desertion, or which may 
have accrued since. Arrange with rendezvous commanders accord- 
ingly. Under the foregoing, care must be taken not to discharge any 
desertei*s who have been arrested and delivered up. 

Please acknowledge this. 

By command : 

THOMAS M. VINCENT, 

Ass isia nt A dju taut- General, 



War Department, Adjutant-General's Office, 

Washinyion, D, C\, May S, 1865, 
All Dept. Commanders and Chief Mustering Officers: 

All soldiers patients in hospitals (except veteran volunteers, vet- 
erans of the First Army Corps, Major-General Hancock's, and soldiera 
of the Rc»gular Army) will, as soon as they shall cease to require 
medical treatment, be at oncje mustered out of service in the usual 
manner. Should the commissary of musters and his assistants be 
insufficient to perform this duty promptly, you are authorized to 
appoint such additional assistants as you may consider necessary, and 
to avail yourself of such mustering officers within the geographical 
limits of your command as, in the judgment of the chief mustering 
officer, can bo spared from their present duties. The commissary of 
musters must take especial pains to see that the commanding officers 
of the regiments and chief mustering officers of the States to which the 
soldiei-s belong are each furnished with a copy of the muster-out roll. 
An extra copy may be made for this purpose, if necessary. Soldiers 
whose claims for pensions are entitled to consideration should be dis- 
charged on the usual surgeon's certificate of disability. Soldiei-s 
absent on furlough frem hospitals will be notified by the surgeon in 
charge to report to the nearest chief mustering officer for muster out, 



UNION AUTHOBinSS. 6 

and required to acknowledge the receipt of the notification. As soon as 
their acknowledgment of the notification is received their descriptive 
lists will be sent to the chief mustering officer to whom they report. 
Should they return before receiving such notification they will be 
mustered out as the others. A copy of the muster-out roll of all men 
vriU be furnished to the adjutants-general of the States to which the 
raiments belong. It is expected that department commanders will 
use every exertion to have this duty performed promptly and correctly. 

Acknowledge receipt. 

By order of the Secretary of War: 

W. A. NICHOLS, 
Assistant AdjtUani^General. 



General Orders, ( War Dept., Adjt. General's Office, 

No. 82. \ Washington, May 6, JS66. 

FOR REDUCING THE NUMBER OF COMPANY AND STAFF OFFICERS OF 
VOLUNTEER REGIMENTS. 

By direction of the President all company and staff officers of vol- 
unteer regiments absent from their commands on account of physical 
disability, or by virtue of leaves of absence granted them on their 
return to loyal States as prisoners of war, will be lionorably mustered 
out of the service of the United States of date the 15th instant. 

Said officers will immediately apply by letter to the Adjutant-General 
of the Army for their muster-out and discharge papers. In case of 
physical disability from disease or wounds, the letter must be accom- 
panied by a medical certificate of the usual form. 

The post-office address of the officer must be given with care in all 
cases. 

By order of the Secretary of War; 

W. A. NICHOLS, 
Assista nt Adjufa nt- OeneraL 



Attorney-General's Office, 

May 8, 1865. 
The President: 

Sir: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of 
April 21, 1865. 

By the Constitution of the United States (2d Art., sec. 2, d. 1) the 
President is vested with the "power to grant reprieves and pardons 
for offenses against the United States, except in ca^e of impeachment." 

By the 13th section of the act of Congi-ess entitled *'An act to sup- 
press insurrection, to punish treason and i*ebellion, to seize and con- 
fi£K»te the property of rebels, and for other purposes," approved July 
17, 1862, "the President is authorized, at any time hereafter, by proc- 
lamation, to extend to persons who may have participated in the 
existing rebellion, in any State or part thereof, pardon and amnesty, 
with such exceptions and at such time and on such conditions as he 
may deem expedient for the public welfare." 

The right and power of the President to pardon and to issue any 
proclamation of amnesty are derived from the clauses in the Consti- 
tution and the act of Congress as quoted above. 

By the Constitution and the act of Congress the power to pardon in 
individual cases and the power of extending, by proclamation, amnesty 



6 C0BBS8P0NDSNC£, KTO. 

to claAses of individuals ai-e solely in the hands of the P^resident. It 
is, therefore, needless to discuss the question whether the act of Con- 
gress was necessary in order to enable the President lawfully to issue 
a proclamation of pardon and amnesty. 

The power of exercising and extending mercy resides in some depart- 
ment of every well-ordered government. When order and peace reign 
its exercise is frequent and its influence valuable. Its influence is of 
value inestimable at the termination of an insurrection so widespread 
as the one which in our country is just being suppressed. Its appro- 
priate office is to soothe and heal, not to keep alive or to initiate the 
rebellious and malignant passions that induced, precipitated, and 
sustained the insurrection. This power to soothe and heal is appro- 
priately vested in the Executive Department of the Government, 
whose duty it is to recognize and declare the existence of an insur- 
rection, to suppress it by force, and to proclaim its suppression. In 
order, then, that this benign power of the Government should accom- 
plish the objects for which it was given, the extent and limits of the 
power should be clearly understood. Therefore, before proceeding 
to answer the questions propounded in your letter, it would seem to 
be eminently proper to state some of the obvious principles upon 
which the power to grant pardons and amnesty rests, and deduce from 
those principles the limitation of that power. 

The words amnesty and pardon have a usual and well-underatood 
meaning. Neither isdeflned in any act of Congress; the latter is not 
used in the Constitution. 

A pardon is a remission of guilt; an amnesty is an act of oblivion 
or forgetfulness. 

They are acts of sovereign mercy and grace, flowing from the appro- 
priate organ of the Government. 

There can be no pardon where thei-e is no actual or imputed guilt. 
The acceptance of a pardon is a confession of guilt or of the existence 
of a state of facts from which a judgment of guilt would follow. 

A pardon may be absolute and complete or it may be conditional 
or partial. The whole penalty denounced by the law against an 
offender may be forgiven, or so much of it only as may seem expe- 
dient. The power to pardon is not exhausted by its partial use. A 
part of the penalty may be forgiven now, and at a future time another 
part, and so on till the whole is forgiven. Tliis power may be so used 
as to place the offender upon trial and probation as to his good faith 
and purposes. 

A paMon may be upon conditions, and those conditions may be 
precedent or subsequent. 

The conditions, however, appended to a pardon cannot be immoral, 
illegal, or inconsistent with the pardon. 

If a condition precedent annexed to a pardon be immoral, so that 
the person in whose favor it is issued should never speak the truth; 
or illegal, so that he should commit murder; or inconsistent with the 
pardon, so that he should never eat or sleep, the pardon would never 
attach or be of avail. On the other hand, if those conditions were 
subsequent — that is, if it were declared that the pardon should be 
void if the party ever spoke the truth, or if he did not commit mur- 
der, or if he should eat or sleep — the paixlon would attach and be 
valid, and the condition void and of no effect. If a condition subse- 
quent is broken, the offender could be trie<l and punished for the 
original offense. The breach of the condition would make the pardon 
void. Any conditions, precedent or subsequent, may, therefore, be 



tmiON AUTHORITIES. 7 

appended that are not immoral, illegal, or inconsistent with the par- 
doa. This great and sovereign power of mercy can never be used as 
a cover for immoral or illegal conduct. 

As a pardon presupposes that an offense has been committed, and 
ever acts upon the past, the power to grant it never can be exerted 
as an immunity or license for future misdoing. 

A x>ftrdon procured by fraud or for a fraudulent purpose, upon the 
suppression of the truth or the suggestion of falseho<^, is void. It 
is a deed of mercy, given without other fee or reward than the good 
faith, truth, and rex)entance of the culprit. On the other hand, as 
an act of grace freely given, when obtained without falsehood, fraud, 
and for no fraudulent use, it should be liberally construed in favor 
of the repentant offender. 

A promise to x)ardon is not a pardon, and may at any time be with- 
drawn; but a pardon may be offered, and the offer kept open, and 
thus be continuing, so that the i)erson to whom it is offered may 
accept it at a future day. After the pardon has been accepted it 
becomes a valid act, and the x>erson receiving it is entitled to all its 
benefits. 

The principles hereinbefore stated forbid, however, that an offer of 
pardon be construed as a license or indulgence to commit continuing 
or future offenses, or as giving immunity from the consequences of 
such offenses. 

After the offender shall have received notice of the offer, or after a 
reasonable time shall have elapsed within which he must be pre- 
sumed to have received notice of the offer, he cannot continue his 
ill-doing and then accept and rely upon the offer of pardon as an 
indemnity against what he did before and also what he did after 
notice. Such a construction of the pardoning power would virtually 
convert it into a power to license crime. 

The high and necessary power of extending pardon and amnesty 
can never be rightfully exercised so as to enable the President to say 
to offenders against the law, "I now offer you a free pardon for the 
past; or at any future day when you shall, from baffled hopes, or 
after being foiled in dangerous and bloody enterprises, think projwr 
to accept, I will give you a pardon for the then past." 

When men have offended against the law their appeal is for mercy, 
not for justice. In this country and under this Government viola- 
tors of the law have offended against a law of their own making; out 
of their own mouths they are condemned — convicted by their own 
judgments — and, under a law of their own making, they cannot 
appear before the seat of mercy and arrogantly claim' the fulfillment 
of a promise of pardon they have refused and defied. 

The excellence of mercy and charity in a national trouble like 
ours ought not to be undervalued. Such feelings should be fondly 
cherish^ and studiously cultivated. When brought into action they 
should be generously but wisely indulged. Like all the great, neces- 
sary, and useful powers in nature or in government, harm may come 
of their improvident use, and perils which seem past may be renewed, 
and other and new dangers be precipitated. By a too extended, 
thoughtless, or unwise kindness the man or the government may 
warm into life an adder that will requite that kindness by a fatal 
sting from a poisonous fang. 

Keeping in view these obvious and fundamental principles that fix 
and limit the lowers of pardon and amnesty under the Constitution 
and the law, I will proceed to consider the questions propounded by 



8 OOBRESPONDENOE, ETO. 

yon on the proclamations dated, resiiectively, on the 8th day of Decem- 
ber, 1863, and on the 26th day of March, 1864, commonly called the 
amnesty proclamations. 

You ask my opinion, first, as to the proper construction and effect 
of those proclamations upon the citizens and residents of rebel States 
who have taken the oath of amnesty prescribed therein. 

These two proclamations must be read together and regarded as 
one instrument. That must, at least, be so from the date of the last 
proclamation, March 26, 1864. No doubt many persons did, betwixt 
the 8th of December, 1863, and the 26th of March, 1864, take the 
oath who could not have done so had the original proclamation con- 
tained the exceptions set forth in the second. What the rights are 
of those who took the oath in that intermediate space of time, and 
who could not have taken it after the 26th of March, 1864, is purely a 
judicial question. The facts in such cases are accomplished, and 
the rights arising out of those facts have attached and become vested. 
If not improper, it would be, at least, idle in me to express an opinion 
on those cases. The Judicial Department of the Government must 
determine the law in those cases when they are proi)erly presented 
before the courts. 

For all practical purposes, so far as the Executive Department of 
the Government is concerned, both proclamations may therefore be 
regarded as of the date the 26th of March, 1864. From that point of 
view their proi)er operation and effect are now to be considered. 

It is plainly stated on the face of the second proclamation that its 
objects '* were to suppress the insurrection, and to restore the author- 
ity of the United States, and with reference to these objects alone." 
In the midst of a gigantic effort on the part of traitors to dismember 
oui country and overthrow our Government, the President, in the 
legitimate exercise of his great x)owers, invoked the healing influences 
of charity and forgiveness. His great heart but responded to the 
desire of the American people to win back this misguided people to 
their allegiance, and to peace and order, by gentleness, rather than 
to compel obedience by the dread jwwers of war. 

It must not be supposed that in giving expression to and making 
a law of this noble wish of his heart, and the heart of the people 
whom he represented, it was intended to give license and immunity 
to crime and treason for the then future. His expressed object was 
''to suppress the insurrection, and to restore the authority of the 
United States, and that alone." 

His object was made still more manifest when he said that the per- 
son "shall voluntarily come forward" and take the said oath, with the 
purpose of restoring peace and establishing the national authority. 

The reluctant, unrepentant, defying persons who, in their hearts, 
desired the success of the rebellion and the overthrow of the Govern- 
ment, were not invited to take the oath; and if any such should take 
it they would but add perjury — ^a God-defying sin — to that of treason; 
and if that fact can be shown to a judicial tribunal, it seems to me 
that they should take no benefit from the pardon and amnesty. A 
mind and heart unpurged of treason were not invited by the amnesty 
proclamation to add thereto the crime of i)erjury. 

It seems to me, then, that all the citizens and residents of the rebel 
States not excepted from the amnesty, who did, after the issuing of the 
proclamation, or after notice thereof, or within a reasonable time within 
which it must be supposed they had notice, refrain from further hos- 
tilities, and take the oath of amnesty voluntavily, with the purpose of 



UNIOK AUTHORITIES. 9 

restoring peace and establiahing the national authority, being at the 
time free from arrest, confinement, or duress, and not under bonds, 
are entitled to all the benefits and rights so freely and benignly given 
by a magnanimous Government. Where the oath has been taken 
without the purpose of restoring peace and establishing the national 
authority, though taken promptly, it seems to me that the amnesty 
and pardon do not attach. This, however, is a judicial question, 
which the courts may decide contrary to my opinion. I ought not, 
perhaps, to express any. 

In giving this construction to the amnesty proclamation, I have 
been constantly impressed by a paragraph in the last annual message 
of the President of the United States. It reads as follows: 

A year ago general pardon and amnesty, upon specified terms, were offered to 
an, except certain designated classes; and it was, at the same time, made known 
that the exempted clnmon were still within contemplation of special clemency. 
Daring the year many availed themselves of the general proviaion, and many 
more would, only that the signs of bad faith in some led to such precautionary 
measnres as rendered the practical process less easy and certain. During the 
same time, also, special paraons have been granted to individuals of the excepted 
classes, and no voluntary application has been denied. Thus, pxactically, the door 
has been for a full year open to all^ except snch as were not in condition to makea 
free choice ; that is, such as were in custody or under constraint. It is still open 
to all. But the time may come — ^probably will come — when public duty shall 
demand that it be closed, and that, in lien, more rigorous measures than heretofore 
shall be adopted. 

A profound respect for the opinions of that great and good man, 
Abraham Lincoln, late President of the United States, induces me to 
ponder long and well before I can venture to express an opinion dif- 
fering even in a shade from his. But all who had the good fortune 
to know him well must feel and know that, from his very nature, he 
was not only tempted but forced to strain his power of mercy. His 
love for mankind was boundless, his charity was all-embracing, and 
his benevolence so sensitive that he sometimes was as ready to pardon 
the unrepentant as the sincerely penitent offender. Clearly and 
pointedly does the above paragraph show to the world that such was 
his nature. He says: 

Daring the whole year that special nardons have been granted to individuals of 
the excepted classeo,no voluntcffy application has been denied. 

The door of mercy to his heart was, we know, ever open; and yet 
he closes the paragraph with this significant sentence: 

But the time may come— probably will come — ^when public duty shall demand 
that it be closed, and that, in lieu, more rigorous measures than heretofore shall 
be adopted. 

It is probably fair to infer that the late President understood his 
proclamation of amnesty as giving pardon to all, no matter how long 
they had refused, and whether they had offended after notice of the 
offer or not. Whether his powers extended so far is, to say the least, 
a doubtful question. 

I am clear and decided in my conviction that the President has no 
power to make an open offer of pardon which could be relied upon as 
a protection for offenses committed after notice of the offer. This 
opinion is induced from principle, and independently of the language 
of the proclamation. 

The language of the first proclamation is, however, consonant with 
this opinion. It is addressed ''to all persons who have participated 
in the existing rebellion" — words referring to the past. 



10 OOBBESPOITDEKCE, ETC. 

If I am right in this construction of the proclamation — ^and I am 
satisfied in my own mind that I am — another proclamation should be 
issued. Persons should not be invited to lake an oath and to comply 
with terms under which they cannot obtain firm legal rights. It is 
especially due to those who have heretofore and would now avail 
themselves, in good faith, of the benefits of pardon and amnesty, that 
another proclamation should be substituted covering the now past. 
Persons who have been constantly engaged in rebellion should know 
distinctly what they are to do, when and how they are to do it, to free 
themselves from punishment, in whole or in i>art, or to reinstate 
themselves as before the rebellion. Such as have been affected merely 
by their treasonable associations should be absolutely forgiven. 
Appropriate conditions should be appended to the pardons of many. 
The grace and favor of the Government should now be large and gen- 
erous, and the oi)eration and effect of its proper mercy should not be 
left uncertain. 

The second question you ask is as to the rights of the citizens and 
residents of the rebel States who have not taken, nor offered to take, 
the oath and comply with the terms of the proclamation. 

Here, again, we meet trouble and uncertainty. 

The expressed objects of the proclamation are to suppress the 
insurrection and restore the authority of the United States. Can any 
one be permitted to take the oath and comply with the terms prescribed 
in the proclamation in a State or a community where the civil and 
military power of the insurrection has been destroyed and the rebellion 
suppressed, and the authority of the United States is re-established 
without let or hindrance ? Or does the insurrection continue, in legal 
contemplation, though not in fact, until the Executive Department 
of the Government shall, by proclamation, declare that it has been 
suppressed? And would this proclamation of pardon and amnesty 
continue and be open after proclamation that the rebellion had been 
suppressed? 

It would seem from the proclamation that the amnesty was extended 
to those who were willing to aid in suppressing, as well as restoring; 
and yet it may and doubtless will be contended, and with much force 
and show of reason, that ali who have stood by and clung to the 
insurrection till its organization and power, both civil and military, 
were gone, have, nevertheless, a right to take all the benefits of the 
amnesty, because they will lend a reluctant aid in restoring an authority 
which they hate. Amnesty is proffered for aid in suppressing and 
restoring;' amnesty is demanded for the work of restoration; full 
reward is required for less than half of the service that is needed. 

As a measure to aid in the suppression of the rebellion, the late 
proclamation has done its full and complete office. Now, one is desired 
to aid in restoring order and reorganizing society in the rebellious 
States. Reconstruction is not needed ; that word conveys an erroneous 
idea. The construction of this Government is as perfect as human 
wisdom can make it. The trial to which its powers and capacities 
have been subjected in this effort at revolution and dismemberment 
proves with what wisdom its foundations have been laid. Ours is a 
task to preserve principles and powers clearly and well defined, and 
that have carried us safely through our past troubles. Ours is not a 
duty to reconstruct or change. Society in the rebel States has not 
been and is not now in a normal condition, nor in harmony with the 
principles of our Government. That society has rebelled against 
them, and made war upon the principles and powers of our Govern- 



UNION AUTHORITIES. 11 

ment. In so doing it has offended, and stands a convicted culprit. 
Mercy most be largely extended. Some of the great leaders and 
offenders only must be made to feel the extreme rigor of the law — not 
in a spirit of revenge> but to put the seal of infamy upon their con- 
duct. But the mercy extended to the great mass of the misguided 
people can and should be so used as to reorganize society upon a loyal 
and freedom-loving basis. It is manifestly for theii* good, and the 
good of mankind, that this should be done. The power of pardon 
and mercy is adequate to this end. Such conditions, precedent and 
subsequent, can legally and properly be appended as will root out the 
spirit of rebellion and bring society in those States into perfect accord 
with the wise and thoroughly tried principle of our Government. 

If this power of pardon is wisely used, peaee will be established uiK)n 
a sure and permanent basis. 

On these grounds, in addition to what has before been said, I am 
of the opinion that another and a new offer of amnesty, adapted to 
the existing condition of things, should be proclaimed. 

I do not conceive that it is in place just now, even if I wei'e pre- 
pared to do so, which I am not — because not sufficiently advised of 
the temper of those in rebellion — for me to sa^' what should be the 
terms of the suggested proclamation. 

I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

JAMES SPEED, 
AUomey- Oenerah 



General Orders,) War Dept., Adjt. General's Office, 

No. 83. f Washington, May 8, 1865. 

FOR REDUCING THE VOLUNTEER CAVALRY FORCES OF THE ARMY. 

I. Immediately upon i-eceipt of this oixler by commanding generals 
of armies and departments all volunteer soldiers of the cavalry arm 
whose terms of service will expire prior to October 1, 1865, will be 
mustered out and discharged the service of the United States. In 
discharging the said troops the following will be observed: 

1. The musters out will be made, in accordance with existing regu- 
lations, by the commissaries of musters of divisions, under the direc- 
tions of commissaries of musters of corps or departments. 

2. Army and department commandere will forthwith ascertain the 
number of men within their respective commands to' be discharged, 
and report the same direct to the Paymaster-General of the Army, 
forwarding a duplicate of the report to the Adjutant-General. Said 
report must specify the number for each I'egiment, or company, if an 
independent one. 

3. The Paymaster-General will arrange to make immediate pay- 
ment to the men discharged; said payments to be made in the armies 
or departments in which the men may be serving at date of muster 
out. 

II. All cavalry remaining in service after the aforesaid discharges 
have been made will be immediately consolidated into complete maxi- 
mum regimental organizations, and as follows: 

1. Army and department commanders will selix*! and designate the 
oi^nisations to be consolidated. 



12 00BBE8P0KDENCE, ETC. 

2. Organizations from the same State will be consolidated with 
each other. 

3. All supemnmerary commissioned and non-commissioned officers 
will be mastered ont of the date the consolidation of their respectiye 
commands is made. 

4. The commissioned and non-commissioned officers to be retained, 
not exceeding the legal namber, will be selected by army and depart- 
ment commanders. 

5. The proi)er commissaries of mnsters and their assistants will 
be charged, under existing regulations, with the prompt execution of 
the details. 

III. Corps and department commanders will see that the work is 
pushed ynth energy, and executed accurately and promptly, using to 
this end division and brigade commanders to superintend it, with 
their resx)ective staff officers, to aid the mustering officer in collecting 
the necessary data for the transfer rolls (see Circular No. 64, series 
of 1864, Adjutant-Oeneral's Office), muster-out rolls, and other neces- 
sary discharge pai>ers, as well as the preparation of the same. 

IV. Horses and other public property rendered surplus by the 
reduction in the forces will be turned over to and cared for by the 
proper officers of the supply departments concerned. 

V. Regimental and company records, rendered no longer necessary, 
will be taken chaiige of by the proper commissary of musters and 
forwarded to the Adjutant-General of the Army. The records of 
each company or regiment must be arranged by themselves, and the 
package containing them marked distinctly with the contents. 

VI. Commissaries of musters and their assistants will be held 
responsible that the necessary rolls are delivered and forwarded to 
their destination without unnecessary delay. 

By order of the Secretary of War: 

E. D. TOWNSEND, 
Assisiant AdjiUant-Oeneral, 



General Orders, ) War Dept., Adjt. General's Office, 

No. 84. J Washington, May 8, 1865. 

BALANCES OF BOUNTIES PAYABLE TO VOLUNTEERS WHEN HONORABLY 
MUSTERED OUT AND DISCHARGED, ON ACCOUNT OP THE GOVERN- 
MENT NO LONGER REQUIRING THEIR SERVICES. 

I. Veterans who enlisted under the provisions of General Orders, 
No. 191, series of 1863, from this office, and the extensions thereof 
(General Orders, Nos. 324 and 387, of 1863; 20 and 92, of 1864>, and 
recruits ^not veterans) who enlisted for three years or the war, under 
the provisions of the circular letter of October 24, 1863, from the 
Provost-Marshal-GeneraFs Bureau, and its modifications, are, on their 
honorable muster out and discharge from the service of the United 
States before the expiration of their respective terms of enlistment, 
entitled to the unpaid balances of the bounties promised them by the 
orders and laws under which they enlisted. 

II. A volunteer accepted and mustered into service under the act 
of July 4, 1864 (General Orders, No. 224, Adjutant-Generars Office, 
1864), whether for the term of one, two, or three years, is, on muster 
out of service before the expiration of the t«»rm of service for which 
he enlisted, entitled only to receive the projwrtion of the bounty 



UNION AUTHORITIES. 13 

allowed by the act cited, whether one-third or two-thirds thereof, 
which had actually accrued before the date of his discharge. 

For instance, if the soldier volnnteered for two years and is mus- 
tered out before the expiration of the first year of his service, he can- 
not claim either the second or third installments of the bounty of 
$200, which would have been {payable to him had he continued in the 
service till the expiration of the two years for which he enlisted. 

Only the volunteer who at the time of his discharge has completed 
one-half the term of service for which he enlisted is entitled to the 
second installment of one-third the amount of bounty given to him 
by the act, and he is entitled to no more of that bounty. If he is dis- 
charged on the next day after the expiration of one-half of his term 
of enlistment, the second installment of the bounty is due and payable 
to him, but the discharge precludes him from receiving a third install- 
ment, that being due only to a volunteer who may have served his 
entire term of enlistment. 

UI. In discharging men from service mustering officers will note 
the balances of bounties due on the muster-out rolls opposite the 
names of the soldiers respectively. Oreat care must be exercised in 
doing this. Prior to payment paymasters will carefully re-examine 
the rolls, with the view of detecting errors in amounts thereon noted. 

By order of the Secretary of War: 

E. D. TOWNSEND, 
Assistant Adjutant- Oeneral. 



War Department, Adjutant-General's Office, 

Washington, May 8, 1865, 
kUL Deft. Commanders and Chief Mustering Officers: 

The Veteran Reserve Corps is excepted from the operations of the 
telegram of the 3d instant, discharging patients in hospitals, &q, 

THOMAS M. VINCENT, 

Assistant AdjiUant- General 



War Dept., Provost-Marshal-General's Bureau, 

Washington, D. C, May 8, 1866. 
Bvt. Col. W. H. SIDELL, 

Adg. Asst. Provost-Marshal- Oeneral, LouisviUe, Ky,: 
The Secretary of War directs that recruiting be continued until 
June 1, 1866, for the following regiments of coloi-ed troops: The 
Seventy-second, One hundred and nineteenth. One hundred and 
twentieth, One hundred and twenty-first Colored Infantry, the Sixth 
Colored Cavalry, and the Fourth and Thirteenth Colored Artillery, 
none of these regiments, however, to be recruited beyond the maxi- 
mum authorized by law. Require weekly reports to be made of the 
number of men obtained under this authorization. 

JAMES B. FRY, 
Provost-Marshal- General. 



Executive Chamber, 
Washington City, May 9, 1866. 
Ordered: 

1. That all acts and proceedings of the political, military, and civil 
organizations which have been in a state of insuiTcction and rebellion 



14 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. 

within the State of Vii^nia against the authority and laws of the 
United States, and of which Jefferson Davis, John Letcher, and Wil- 
liam Smith were late the respective chiefs, are declared null and void. 
All persons who shall exercise, claim, pretend, or attempt to exercise 
any political, military, or civil power, authority, jurisdiction, or right, 
by, through, or under Jefferson Davis, late of the city of Richmond, and 
his confederates, or under John Letcher or William Smith and their con- 
federates, or under any pretended political, military, or civil commis- 
sion or authority issued by them, or either of them, since the 17th day 
of April, 1861, shall be deemed and taken as in rebellion against the 
United States, and shall be dealt with accordingly. 
. 2. That the Secretary of State proceed to put in force all laws of the 
United States the administration whereof belongs to the Department 
of State applicable to the geographical limits aforesaid. 

3. That the Secretary of the Treasury proceed without delay to 
nominate for appointment assessors of taxes and collectors of customs 
and internal revenue, and such other officer^ of the Treasury Depart- 
ment as are authorized by law, and shall put in execution the revenue 
laws of the United States wfthin the geographical limits aforesaid. In 
making appointment-s the preference shall be given to qualified loyal 
persons residing within the districts where their respective duties are 
to be performed. But if suitable persons shall not be found residents 
of the districts, then persons resi(Ung in other States or districts shall 
be appointed. 

4. That the Postmaster-General shall proceed to establish post- 
offices and post routes, and put into execution the postal laws of the 
United States within the said State, giving to loyal residents the 
preference of appointment; but if suitable persons are not found, then 
to appoint agents, Ac, from other States. 

6. That the district judge of said district proceed to hold courts 
within said State in accordance with the provisions of the act of 
Congress. The Attorney-General will instruct the proper officers to 
libel and bring to judgment, confiscation, ai\d sale property subject 
to confiscation, and enforce the administration of justice within said 
State, in all matters civil and criminal within the cognizance and 
jurisdiction of the Federal courts. 

6. That the Secretary of War assign such assistant provost-mai-shal- 
general and such provost-marshals in each district of said State as he 
may deem necessary. 

7. The Secretary of the Navy will take possession of all public 
property belonging to the Navy Department within said geographical 
limits, and put in operation all acts of Congress in relation to naval 
affaii's having application to the said State. 

8. The Secretary of the Interior will also put in force the laws 
relating to the Department of the Interior. 

9. That to carry into effect the guarantee by the Federal Constitu- 
tion of a republican form of Slate government, and affoi^ the 
advantage and security of domestic laws, as well as to complete the 
^-establishment of the authority and laws of the United States and 
the full and complete restoration of peace within the limits aforesaid, 
Francis H. Peirpoint, Governor of the State of Virginia, will be aided 
by the Federal Govern tnent, so far as may be necessary, in the lawful 
measures which he may take for the extension and administration of 
the State government throughout the geographical limits of said 
State. 



UNION AUTHORITIES. 15 

In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the 
seal of the United States to be affixed. 
[l. s.] ANDREW JOHNSON. 

By the President: 

W. HUNTER, 
Acting Secretary of Stat£, 



General Orders, ) War Dept., Adjt. General's Office, 

No. 86. ) Washington, May 9, I860, 

LISTS TO BE MADE OF VOLUl^EBR OFFICERS. 

For the information of the War Department, lists will at once be 
prepared and forwarded of all officers in the volunteer service, made 
out separately for each ann of the service and each branch of the 
stafTy showing the relative merit of the officers in their refameuts or 
departments, as determined by boards of officers, to be appointed for 
the purpose by corps and other independent commanaers. The 
repoTta of the boards will include the names of all officers belonging 
to a particular command, whether present or absent; and in the cases 
of the absent officers the reports will be based upon the best informa* 
tion attainable. The reports will also state what officers, in the opin- 
ion of the boards, should be. discharged. 

These lists will be forwarded through the prescribed channel, and 
the several commanders through whom they may be transmitted will 
indorse thereon their recommendations, based on their own knowledge 
of the character of the officers. 

The lists will specify the rank and arm for which the officer is 
deemed competent, and whether he desires to remain in the military 
service. For all officers below the grade of colonel these lists will bo 
consolidated and arranged by brigade, division, and corps command- 
ers (or independent commands of less than a corps), so as to include 
all officers in the corps. 

The lists of colonels, generals, and staff officers will also be consoli- 
dated at army or department and military division headquarters. 

In addition to the lists thus furnished through the ordinary military 
channels, the chiefs of staff departments at Washington will at once 
obtain from their subordinates similar lists, conveniently consoli- 
dated, and forward them to this Department. 

By order of the Secretary of War: 

E. D. TOWNSEND, 
Assistant Adjutant- Oeneral, 



General Orders, ) War Dept., Adjt. General's Office, 

No. 87. 5 Washington, May 0, 1865, 

CONCERNING ENGINEER PROPERTY AND LABOR ON FIELD-WORKS. 

Army and department commanders will at once cause to be collected 
and stored, at convenient depots, all tools, siege material, bridge equi- 
page, and other engineer property not absolutely needed for immedi- 
ate service with troops, and have inventories of property so collected 
forwarded to the Chief Engineer of the Army, with recommendation 
for its disposal. The latter will give the necessary instructions. 



16 CORR£8P02iD£NC£, ETC. 

All labor on construction and repairs of field-works should now be 
done by troops; hired labor will not, therefore, be so employed, unless 
specially authorized from these headquarters or the Engineer Depart- 
ment; and no further purchases of engineer material for field-works 
will be made without similar authority, except in cases of urgent 
necessity. 
By order of the Secretary of War: 

E. D. TOWNSEND, 
Assistant AdjiUant-Oeneral. 



Circular.] War Dept., Adjutant-General's Office, 

Washington, May 9, 1865, 
All Army and Department Commanders: 

Upon receipt hereof you are authorized to cause the immediate 
muster out and discharge from service of all officers and soldiers of 
your commands whose terms of service will expire prior to May 31, 
1866. 

In discharging the said troops the following will be observed: 

1. The musters out will be made, in accordance with existing regu- 
lations, by the commissaries of musters of divisions, under the direc- 
tions of commissaries of musters of corps or departments. 

2. Army and department commanders will forthwith ascertain the 
number of men within their respective commands to be discharged, 
and report the same direct to the Paymaster-General of the Army, 
forwarding a duplicate report to the Adjutant-General. Said report 
must specify the number for each regiment, or company, if an inde- 
pendent one. 

3. The Paymaster-General will arrange to make immediate pay- 
ment to the men discharged, said payments to be made in the armies 
or departments in which the men may be serving at the date of mus- 
ter out. 

By order of the Secretary of War: 

E. D. TOWNSEND, 
Assistant Adjutant-Oe?ieral. 



General Orders, ) Quartermaster-General's Office, 

No. 29. J WashingUm City, May 9, 1865. 

I. For the purpose of securing a uniform system in the transporta- 
tion of public property, the annexed forms* for requisitions and bills 
of lading will hereafter be adopted and the accompanying instruc- 
tions strictly observed. No other forms will be used except in cases 
of emergency, when the prescribed forms cannot be procured, and 
then the reasons for using others will be stated upon the same. 

II. The bill of lading should state where the freight is to be paid, 
and if the transportation is by water, or under contract varying from 
Government rates, the rates should be specifically stated in the bill 
of lading, otherwise it should state that payment is to be made at 
Government rates. Bills of lading issued for shipments to be for- 
warded on boate belonging to or in the service of the Quartermaster's 
Department, or on railroads operated by the Government, should state 
that no payment will be made on the bills of lading. 

* Omitted. 



UNION AUTHORITIES. 17 

III. Officersorderingtransportation of wagons, ambulances, cannon, 
caissons, gun carriages, Ac, will be particular to state in the bill of 
lading whether they are to be transported whole or taken apart. In 
shipments by rail, the number of animals, bales of hay and their 
weight, of pieces of lumber and measurement thereof, should be 
expressed in the bill of lading in numbers, in addition to the same in 
car-loads. The weight of different descriptions of goods must be 
given separately. When, in an invoice covering a variety of articles, 
or a number of packages, the total weight only is expressed, the offi- 
cer receiving the property must, in certifying to its correctness, write 
out the weight delivered in words as well as in figures. 

IV. Erasures, interlineations, or alterations in bills of lading 
must be explained thereon by the issuing or other competent officer. 

V. Officers making shipments will at the time of shipping furnish 
the carrier with the original bill of lading, which upon the delivery of 
the proi)erty will be receipted by the officer receiving the same, and 
returned to the carrier with such indorsement as may be necessary 
to insure settlement for the service. The original bill of lading, 
receipted, alone will be received in settlement, and in no case will a 
second original bill of lading be issued for the same shipment. 

VI. Duplicate and triplicate copies of the bill of lading will be 
promptly transmitted by mail to the consignee, and upon the receipt 
of the property the duplicate will be receipted and returned by mail 
to the officer making the shipment. The triplicate will be retained 
by the officer i-eceiving the property. A copy, or quadruplicate, will 
be retained in book form by the consignor for his information. 

VII. In the absence or failure of any officer to receipt for property 
consigned to him, the officer signing should make a full explanation 
over his signature, showing that he is duly authorized to receive and 
receipt for the same, and why the consignee does not receipt therefor. 
Agents or clerks are not autnorized to receipt bills of lading. 

VIII. Loss and damage to Government property will be deducted 
in settlement from the voucher issued to the carrier, and officers 
receipting for property must indorse on the bill of lading the kinds 
of property lost or damaged, and its full value, including transporta- 
tion. When the amount of the damage to property cannot be readily 
ascertained, the receiving officer should promptly call a board of 
survey on the same, and duly notify the carrier that he may, if he 
desires, lye present with witnesses to protect his interest. The bill of 
lading should not be signed until the amount of damage is decided 
upon by the report of the board of survey, when an indorsement of 
their decision should be made upon the bill of ladings 

IX. Quartermasters wiU be governed in the settlement of claims 
for transfer and ferriage by existing instructions and decisions of the 
Quartermaster-General. 

X. Bills of lading for through shipments will only be settled with 
the last carrier entitled to payment. Quartermasters should exercise 
care that no second claim is presented by roads performing part of 
the through transportation. The last carrier will be held responsible 
for all loss or damage, and such loss or damage will be deducted in 
making settlement for the service. 

XI. The distance by the shortest practicable route, whether over 
one or many roads, will govern the rate chai'ged. Transxwrtation by 
water being generally the cheapest should be used when consistent 
with the interest of the service, and all transportation should be 

2 R R— SKBIKS in, VOL V 



18 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. 

furnished by the shortest practicable route, nnless a different one 
is designated in the order. When transportation is specifically 
demanded by a proper officer by a longer route, the reason must be 
given in the bill of lading, and payment will be made according to 
the length of the route designated, the officer being held to a strict 
accountability for his requisition. 

XII. Quartermasters will be governed in the settlement of claims 
for transportation by railroad by the rates and classification of the 
circular of the Quartermaster-General dated May 1, 1862, and all 
transportation must be settled at the points designated in General 
Orders, No. 18, Quartermaster-General's Office, March 16, 1865. 

By order of the Quartermaster-General: 

LEWIS B. PARSONS, 
Brig, Gen, and Chief of Rail and River Transportation, 



By the President of the United States of America: 
A proclamation. 

Whereas, the President of the United States by his proclamation of 
the nineteenth day of April, one thousand eight hundred and sixty- 
one, did declare certain States therein mentioned in insurrection 
against the Government of the United States; and 

Wheieas, armed resistance to the authority of this Government in 
the said insurrectionary States may be regarded as virtually at an 
end, and the persons by whom that resistance, as well as the oper- 
ations of insurgent cruisers, was directed, are fugitives or captives; 
and 

Whereas, it is understood that some of these cruisers are still infest- 
ing the high seas, and others are preparing to capture, burn, and 
destroy vessels of the United States: 

Now, therefore, be it known that I, Andrew Johnson, President of 
the United States, hereby enjoin all naval, military, and civil officers 
of the United States diligently to endeavor, by all lawful means, to 
arrest the said cruisers and to bring them into a port of the United 
States, in order that they may be prevented from committing further 
depredations on commerce, and that the persons on board of them 
may no longer en jt)y impunity for their crimes. 

And I do further proclaim and declare that if, after a reasonable 
time shall have elapsed for this proclamation to become known in the 
ports of nations claiming to have been neutrals, the said insurgent 
cruisers and the persons on board of them shall continue to receive 
hospitality in the said ports, this Government will deem itself justi- 
fied in refusing hospitality to the public vessels of such nations in 
ports of the United States, and in adopting such other measures as 
may be deemed advisable toward vindicating the national sovereignty. 

In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the 
seal of the United States to be affixed. 

Done at the city of Washington this tenth day of May, in the year 
of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-five, and of the 
Independence of the United States of America the eighty-ninth. 

[L. 8.] ANDREW JOHNSON. 

By the President: 

W. HUNTER, 
Acting Secretary of State, 



UNION AUTHORIT1B8. 19 

General Ordebs, ) War Dbpt., Adjt. General's Office, 

No. 91. j Washington, May 12, 1866, 

order oroanizino bureau of refugees, freedmen, and aban- 
doned LANDS. 

I. By direction of the President, Maj. Gen. O. O. Howard is assigned 
to duty in the War Department as Commissioner of the Bureau of 
Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands, under the act of Con- 
gress entitled "An act to establish a bureau for the relief of freed- 
men and refugees," to perform the duties and exercise all the rights, 
authority, and jurisdiction vested by the act of Congress in such com- 
missioner. General Howard will enter at once upon the duties of 
Commissioner specified in said act. 

II. The Quartermaster-General will without delay assign and fur- 
nish suitable quarters and apartments for the said Bureau. 

III. The Adjutant-General will assign to the said Bureau tlie num- 
ber of competent clerks authorized by the act of Congress. 

liy order of the President of the United States: 

E. D. TOWNSEND, 
Assistant Adjutant- General, 

Act referred to in General Orders, No. 01 (A. G. O.), 1865. 
AN ACT to establish a bnreati for the relief of freedmen and refugees. 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the 
United Staies of America in Congress assembled, That there is hereby 
established in the War Department, to continue during the present 
war of rebellion, and for one year thereafter, a Bureau of Refugees, 
Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands, to which shall be committed, as 
hereinafter provided, the supervision and management of all aban- 
doned lands, and the control of all subjects relating to i^f ugees and 
freedmen from rebel States, or from any district of country within 
the territory embraced in the operations of the Army, under such 
rules and regulations as may be prescribed by the head of the Bureau 
and approved by the President. The said Bureau shall be under the 
management and control of a commissioner to l)e appointed by the 
Pi-esident, by and with the advice and consent of tlie Senate, whose 
compensation shall be three thousand dollars per annum, and such 
number of clerks as may be assigned to him by the Secretary of War, 
not exceeding one chief clerk, fcwo of the fourth class, two of tlie third 
class, and five of the first class. And the Commissioner, and all per- 
sons appointed under this act, shall, before entering upon their duties, 
take the oath of office prescribed in an act entitled '*An act to pre- 
scribe an oath of office, and for other purposes," approved July sec- 
ond, eighteen hundred and sixty-two; and the Commissioner and 
chief clerk shall, before entering upon their duties, give bonds to the 
Treasurer of the United States, the former in tlie sum of fifty thousand 
doUarB, and the latter in the sum of ten thousand dollars, conditioned 
for the faithful discharge of their duties, respectively, with securities 
to be approved as sufficient by the Attorney-General, which bonds 
shall be filed in the office of the First Comptroller of the Treasury, 
to be by him put in suit for the benefit of any injured party upon any 
breach of the conditions thereof. 

Sec. 2. And be it further enacted. That the Secretary of War may 
direct such iesnes of provisions, clothing, and fuel as he may deem 



18 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. 

furnished by the shortest practicable route, unless a different one 
is designated in the order. When tran8X)ortation is specifically 
demanded by a proper officer by a longer route, the reason must be 
given in the bill of lading, and payment will be made according to 
the length of the route designated, the officer being held to a strict 
accountability for his requisition. 

XII. Quartermasters will be governed in the settlement of claims 
for transportation by railroad by the rates and classification of the 
circular of the Quartermaster-General dated May 1, 1862, and all 
transportation must be settled at the points designated in General 
Orders, No. 18, Quartermaster-General's Office, March 16, 1865. 

By order of the Quartermaster-General: 

LEWIS B. PARSONS, 
Brig. Gen, and Chief of Rail and River Transportation. 



By the President of the United States of America: 
A proclamation. 

Whereas, the President of the United States by his proclamation of 
the nineteenth day of April, one thousand eight hundred and sixty- 
one, did declare certain States therein mentioned in insurrection 
against the Government of the United States; and 

Wheieas, armed resistance to the authority of this Government in 
the said insurrectionary States may be regarded as virtually at an 
end, and the persons by whom that resistance, as well as the oper- 
ations of insurgent cruisers, was directed, are fugitives or captives; 
and 

Whereas, it is understood that some of these cruisers are still infest- 
ing the high seas, and others are preparing to capture, burn, and 
destroy vessels of the United States: 

Now, therefore, be it known that I, Andrew Johnson, President of 
the United States, hereby enjoin all naval, military, and civil officers 
of the United States diligently to endeavor, by all lawful means, to 
arrest the said cruisers and to bring them into a port of the United 
States, in order that they may be prevented from committing further 
depredations on commerce, and that the persons on board of them 
may no longer enjt)y impunity for their crimes. 

And I do further proclaim and declare that if, after a reasonable 
time shall have elapsed for this proclamation to become known in the 
ports of nations claiming to have been neutrals, the said insurgent 
cruisers and the persons on board of them shall continue to receive 
hospitality in the said ports, this Government will deem itself justi- 
fied in refusing hospitality to the public vessels of such nations in 
ports of the United States, and in adopting such other measures as 
may be deemed advisable toward vindicating the national sovereignty. 

In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the 
seal of the United States to be affixed. 

Done at the city of Washington this tenth day of May, in the year 
of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-five, and of the 
Independence of the United States of America the eighty-ninth. 

[L. 8.] ANDREW JOHNSON. 

By the President: 

W. HUNTER, 
Acting Secretary of Staie. 



UNION AUTHORIT1E8. 19 

General Ordsbs, ) War Dept., Adjt. General's Office, 

No. 91. ) Washington, May 12, 1865. 

order organizing bureau of refugees, freedmen, and aban- 
doned LANDS. 

I. By direction of the President, Maj. Gen. O. O. Howard is assigned 
to duty in the War Department as Commissioner of the Bureau of 
Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands, under the act of Con- 
gress entitled "An act to establish a bureau for the relief of freed- 
men and refugees," to perform the duties and exercise all the rights, 
authority, and jurisdiction vested by the act of Congress in such com- 
missioner. General Howaitl will enter at once upon the duties of 
Commissioner specified in said act. 

II. The Quartermaster-Greneral will without delay assign and fur- 
nish suitable quarters and apartments for the said Bureau. 

III. The Adjutant-General will assign to the said Bureau tlie num- 
ber of competent clerks authorized by the act of Congress. 

}^Y order of the President of the United States: 

E. D. TOWNSKND, 
Assisiwii Adjutan f- General. 

Act referred to in General Orders, No, 01 (A. G. O.), 1S65. 
AN ACT to establish a bureau for the relief of freedmen and refugees. 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the 
United States of America in Congress assemble, That there is hereby 
established in the War Department, to continue during the present 
war of rebellion, and for one year thereafter, a Bureau of Refugees, 
Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands, to which shall be committed, as 
hereinafter provided, the supervision and management of all aban- 
doned lands, and the control of all subjects relating to i^ef ugees and 
freedmen from rebel States, or from any district of country within 
the territory embraced in the operations of the Army, under such 
rules and regulations as may be prescribed by the head of the Bureau 
and approved by the President. The said Bureau shall be under the 
management and control of a commissioner to be appointed by the 
President, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, whose 
compensation shall be three thousand dollars per annum, and such 
number of clerks as may be assigned to him by the Secretary of War, 
not exceeding one chief clerk, two of the fourth class, two of the third 
class, and five of the first class. And the Commissioner, and all per- 
sons appointed under this act, shall, before entering upon their duties, 
take the oath of office prescribed in an act entitled '*An act to pre- 
scribe an oath of office, and for other purposes," approved July sec- 
ond, eighteen hundred and sixty-two; and the Commissioner and 
chief clerk shall, before entering upon their duties, give bonds to the 
Treasurer of the United States, the former in the sum of fifty thousand 
dollars, and the latter in the sum of ten thousand dollars, conditioned 
for the faithful discharge of their duties, respectively, with securities 
to be approved as sufficient by the Attorney-General, which bonds 
shall be filed in the office of the First Comptroller of the Treasury, 
to be by him put in suit for the benefit of any injured party upon any 
breach of the conditions thereof. 

Sec. 2. And be it further enacted^ That the Secretary of War may 
direct such issues of provisions, clothing, and fuel as he may deem 



20 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. 

needftil for the immediate and temporary shelter and supply of desti- 
tute and suffering refugees and f reedmen and their wives and children, 
under such rules and regulations as he may direct. 

Sec. 3. And be it further enacted, That the President may, by and 
with the advice and consent of the Senate, appoint an assistant com- 
missioner for each of the States declared to be in insurrection, not 
exceeding ten in number, who shall, under the direction of the Com- 
missioner, aid in the execution of the provisions of this act; and he 
shall give a bond to the Treasurer of the United States, in the sum of 
twenty thousand dollars, in the form and manner prescribed in the 
first section of this act. Each of said commissioners shall receive an 
annual salary of two thousand five hundred dollars in full compensa- 
tion for all his services. And any military officer may be detailed and 
assigned to duty under this act without increase of pay or allowances. 
The Commissioner shall, before the commencement of each regular 
session of Congress, make full rex)ort of his proceedings, with exhibits 
of the state of his accounts, to the President, who shall communicate 
the same to Congress, and shall also make special reports whenever 
required to do so by the President or either House of Congress; and 
the assistant commissioners shall make quarterly rei)orts of their pro- 
ceedings to the Commissioner, and also such other special reports as 
from time to time may be required. 

Sec. 4. And he it further enacted, That the Commissioner, under 
the direction of the President, shall have authority to set apart, for 
the use of loyal refugees and freedmen, such tracts of land within 
the insurrectionary States as shall have been abandoned, or to which 
the United States shall have acquired title by confiscation or sale, or 
otherwise; and to every male citizen, whether refugee or freedman as 
aforesaid, there shall be assigned not more than forty acres of such 
land, and the person to whom it was so assigned shall be protected in 
the use and enjoyment of the land for the term of three years at an 
annual rent not exceeding six per centum upon the value of such land 
as it was appraised by the State authorities in the year eighteen hun- 
dred and sixty for the purpose of taxation; and in case no such 
appraisal can be found, then the rental shall be based upon the esti- 
mated value of the land in said year, to be ascertained in such man- 
ner as the Commissioner may by regulation prescribe. At the end of 
said term, or at any time during said term, the occupants of any par- 
cels so assigned may purchase the land and receive such title thereto 
as the United States can convey, upon paying therefor the value of 
the land as ascertained and fixed for the purpose of determining the 
annual rent aforesaid. 

Sec. 6. And be it further enacted^ That all act« and parts of acts 
inconsistent with the provisions of this act are hereby repealed. 

Approved March 3, 18C5. 



General Orders, \ War Dept., Adjt. General's Office, 

No. 94. ) Washington, May 15, 1865. 

The following regulations are announced, and will be observed in 
discharging from service such volunteers as are hereafter to be mus- 
tered out with their regimental or company oi^anizations: 

I. Army corps, or at least the divisions thereof, will be kept intact, 
and immediately upon receipt of an order directing any portion of the 
forces to be mustered out commanding generals of armies and depart- 



UNION AUTHORITIES. 21 

ments will order the said troops (if not already thereat) to one of the 
following rendezvous, viz : 

1. Middle Military Division, and troops of other armies or depart- 
ments arriving therein: Defenses of Washington, D. C; Harper's 
Ferry, Va., and Cumberland, Md. 

2. Military Division of the James: Richmond and Old Point Com- 
fort, Va. 

3. Department of North Carolina: New Berne and Wilmington. 

4. Department of the South: Charleston, S. C, and Savannah, Ga. 

5. Military Division of West Mississippi : Mobile, Ala. ; New Orleans, 
La., and Vicksbui'g, Miss. 

0. Military Division of the Missouri : Little Rock, Ark. ; Saint Louis, 
Mo., and Fort Leavenworth, Kans. 

7. Department of the Cumberland: Nashville, Knoxville, and Mem- 
phis, Tenn. 

8. Department of Kentucky: Louisville. 

9. Middle Department: Baltimore, Md. 

Commanding generals of armies and departments are authorized to 
change the aforesaid places of rendezvous should the public interest 
so demand. 

For the Departments of the East, Pennsylvania, Northern, North- 
west, New Mexico, and Pacific, such special orders will be given from 
the Adjutant-GeneraFs Office relative to the troops therein serving 
as may be demanded by circumstances as the time for discharge is 
approached. 

II. In case of one or more regiments of a division being mustered 
out — the division remaining in the field — said regiment or regiments 
will be mustered out at the place where found serving at the time, 
and then placed en route to the State, as hereinafter directed. 

III. The Adjutant-General of the Army wiU designate places of 
rendezvous in the respective States, to which the regiments, after 
muster out, will be forwarded for payment. 

IV. Upon arrival at the rendezvous where the musters out are to 
take place, a critical examination of the regimental and company 
records, books, <fec., will be made; and in case of omissions, the proper 
commanders will be made to supply them, and make all the entries as 
enjoined by the Army Regulations. At the same time the muster-out 
rolls will be commenced and prepared in accordance with existing 
regulations, under the direction of the assistant commissaries of 
mustei-s of divisions, superintended by the corps commissaries. Corps 
and department commanders will see that the work is pushed with 
enei^3'^ and executed promptly, using to this end division and brigade 
commanders to superintend it, and their respective staff officers to 
aid the mustering officera in collecting the data for the muster-out 
rolls and discharge papers, as well as the preparation of the same. 
In framing the rolls particular care must be exercised in stating 
balances of bounty payable. (See General Orders, No. 84, current 
series, from this office.) 

V. So soon as the rolls of a regiment are completed, the said com- 
mand, with its arms, colors, and necessary equipage, will be placed 
en route to its State, and to the rendezvous therein at or nearest which 
it was mustered in. 

£n route, and after arrival in the State, the following will be 
observed: 

1. Immediately on arrival at the State rendezvous the regiment will 
be reported to and taken control of by the chief mustering officer for 



22 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. 

the state, or his assistant at the point. The said officers will lend 
all needful assistance in their power to the paymasters, with the view 
to prompt payment of the troops. 

2. The regimental officers will be held to a strict accountability for 
the discipline of their commands and preservation of public property. 

3. The commissary of musters of the division to which the regiment 
belonged in the field will take possession of the copies of muster-out 
rolls intended for the field and staff, companies, and paymaster; also 
the company and regimental recoids, with all surplus blank rolls, 
returns, discharges, <fec., in ix>sses8ion of regimental and company 
commanders, or other officers, and after boxing them up place them, 
whilst en route, under the special charge of a discreet and responsible 
officer of the regiment. The sole duty of said officer will be to care 
for and preserve said rolls and records whilst en route, and on arrival 
at the StAte rendezvous where payment is to be made to turn them 
over to the chief mustering officer or his assistant at that place. 

4. Paymasters will be designated by the Pay Department to meet 
regiments at the designated State rendezvous and there make final 
payments, obtaining for that purpose the rolls from the mustering 
officer thereat. 

5. Whilst troops are awaiting payment supplies will be furnished 
by the respective supply departments, on the usual i*equisitions and 
returns, countersigned by the chief mustering officer or his assistant. 

6. Until after payment and the final discharge of the troops the 
chief mustering officer will look to their being kept together and under 
discipline. 

7. The chief mustering officer will, under regulations to be estab- 
lished by himself, take possession of and carefully preserve the regi- 
mental and company records, also the colors with the respective 
regiments, and hold them subject to orders from the Adjutant- 
Greneral of the Army. 

8. As soon as practicable after arrival at the State rendezvous the 
chief mustering officer or his assistant will see that the arms and other 
public property brought to the State by the troops are turned over to 
the proper officer of the supply department thereat. 

VI. In preparing the muster-out rolls, corps, department, division, 
and brigade commanders will hold regimental officers to a strict 
accountability, in order to insure accurate and complete records of 
the enlisted men, and the better to establish the just claims of the 
non-commissioned officers and privates who have been wounded, or of 
the representatives of those who have died from disease or wounds, 
or been killed in battle. 

VII. Prior to the departure of regiments from the i^endezvous where 
mustered out, all public property (except arms, colors, and equipage 
required en route) will be turned over to and cared for by the proper 
officers of the supply departments concerned. 

VIII. What is prescribed in the foregoing for a regiment will be 
applicable to a battery of artillery or an independent company. 

IX. At the i-especti ve State rendezvous the following is ordered, viz : 

1. The Paymaster-General will be prepared to have a sufficient force 
of paymasters to insure prompt payments. 

2. The Quartermaster-General and Commissary-General of Sub- 
sistence will be prepared to have a suitable number of officers of their 
respective bureaus to provide supplies, transportation, d;c., and 
receipt for public property. 

3. The Chief of Ordnance will arrange to have a suitable number of 
officers of his Bureau to receive the arms, accounterments, Ac, 



UNION AUTROtirriEB. 



23 



X. The attention of commanding generals of armies and depart- 
ments is directed to the importance of regimental and company officers 
having their records so completed and arranged that at any time the 
muster-out rolls may be prepared without delay. 
By order of the Secretary of War: 

E. D. TOWNSEND, 
Aaaiatant At^uiant-QenercU, 



CmcuLAB) War Dbpt., Adjutant-Gbnbral's Office, 

No. 18. ) Washington^ May 16, 1865, 

After the receipt of this commissaries of musters for army corps 
and departments will render tri-monthly a report of troops mustered 
out of service under their direction. The first report will embrace 
all troops mustered out since the Ist instant. 

To this end assistant commissaries of musters for divisions will 
forward corresponding reports to the corps or dex>artment commis- 
saries, and these, after consolidation with such musters out as that 
officer may have made during the same i>eriod, will be forwarded to 
the Adjutant-General of the Army on the 10th, 20th, and last days 
of each month. 

The corps (or department) commissary of musters will forward the 
consolidated report, which must be in accordance with the following 
form, viz: 

Tri-^monVdy report of iroqp$ mustered out of the service of the United States from 
to , 186— f by , commissary of musters. 





orgftnlution. 


Date of 

muster 

out. 


Str«ngtb or 
number mus- 
tered out. 




state to whtoh 


^1 


i 


Remarks. 


Ohio 


sathVoluntoorSDfantry.... 
Tth Volunteer CaTiUry . .... 


May 31 

June 2 
Jnoo 8 


25 
6 
17 


605 

200 
425 


KoTB — Envelope con- 
taining report wUl be ad- 
d^Msed te Bvt. Col. T. M. 
Vinoent, aaaiatent a^Jn- 
tant-Roneral. Adjutant 
General's OfBee, Washlnic 
ton, D. C. 


KcwTork 


Total 


48 


1.280 









A B , 

Osptem, Twm%ty»ixth Kew York Cavalry, Commitsary qf Muttertt TwmUif/aurUi Oorpt. 



Date: 



Official. 



E. D. TOWNSEND, 

Assistant Ac^utanU General. 



Gbnbral Obdebs, ) Mil. Div. of thb Mississippi, 

V CmsF £nor.'£ Office, U. S. Mil. R. Rs., 
No. — . ) New Berne, N. C, May 16, 1866. 

By order of the director and general manager of the U. S. Military 
Railroads the Constmction Corps in the Department of North Carolina 



24 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. 

is disbanded, and the number of employ^ on the military railroads 
reduced to a force barely sufficient to keep in repair and operate the 
Morehead City and Raleigh and the Wilmington-Goldsborough lines. 

All men discharged under this order will be furnished free trans- 
portation by water from here to Fortress Monroe, or some other 
Northern X)ort, and those who have served for three monthly or longer 
will be furnished transportation from there to their homes. 

Good order and discipline are enjoined upon the members of Con- 
struction Corps while en route to their homes, and I sincerely trust 
that all will conduct themselves worthy of the high reputation which 
this organization has justly acquired. 

' You leave the service because your work is done. The cause of the 
Union is triumphant and the rebellion virtually crushed. 

Many of you have served long and faithfully m the military railroad 
service, and you now leave it with the proud consciousness of having 
done your part to make our cause successful 

Not only does General Sherman bear testimony to the value of the 
services of the Construction Corps in opening and keeping open his 
lines of communication and supplies, and thus enabling him to make 
his long and damaging marches into the enemy's territory, but even 
his formidable opponent, the rebel leader General Johnston, gives his 
testimony to the same effect. 

With such a record you may be well satisfied. 

W. W. WRIGHT, 
Chief Engr. Mtlif^ry RaUroadSj Mil Div. of the Mississippi, 



Circular) War Dept., Adjutant-General's Office, 

No. 19. j Washington, May 16, 1865, 

I. Under paragraph III, Greneral Orders, No. 94, May 15, current 
series, from this office, the following State rendezvous, to which troops 
mustered out will be forwarded for payment, ^re announced, viz: 

Maine: Augusta, Portland, and Bangor. 

New Hampshire : Concord and Manchester. 

Vermont: Montpelier, Brattleborough, and Burlington. 

Massachusetts: Boston (Readville and Gallupe's Island). 

Rhode Island: Providence. 

Connecticut: Hartford and New Haven. 

New York : New York City (Hart's Island), Albany, Elmira, Buffalo, 
Rochester, Syracuse, Sackett's Harbor, Plattsburg, and Ogdensburg. 

New Jersey: Trenton. 

Pennsylvania: Philadelphia, Harrisburg, and Pittsburg. 

Delaware: Wilmington. 

Maryland: Baltimore and Frederick. 

West Virginia: Wheeling. 

Ohio: Cincinnati (Camp Dennison), Cleveland (Camp Cleveland), 
Columbus (Camp Chase and Tod Barracks). 

Indiana: Indianapolis. 

Illinois: Springfield and Chicago. 

Michigan : Detroit and Jackson. 

Wisconsin: Madison and Milwaukee. 

Minnesota: Fort Snelling. 

Iowa: Davenport and Clinton. 

Kansas: Lawrence and Leavenworth. 

Missouri : Saint Louis (Benton Barracks). 

Kentucky: Louisville, Lexington, and Covington. 



XJNION AUTHORITIES. 25 

n. When the muster out of a regiment has been completed, and it 
is ready to start for the State (see paragraph V, General Orders, No. 
94, current series, Adjutant-General's Office), the assistant commis- 
sary of musters for the division to which it belongs will immediately 
report (by telegram when practicable) to the Paymaster-General of 
the Army, Washington, D. C, its numerical designation, number of 
conunissioned officers, number of enlisted men, and rendezvous in the 
State where ordered to for payment and final discharge. 

By order of the Secretary of War: 

E. D. TOWNSEND, 
Assistant Adjutant^ Oeneral. 



War Department, Adjutant-General's Office, 

Washington, May 16, 1865, 
The Secretary of War directs that the provisions of General Orders, 
No. 77, current series, be extended to include all patients who, 
although requiring further medical treatment, are able to travel and 
desire to be discharged (with the exceptions heretofore made). Also 
all men yet in hospitals, recently transferred to the Veteran Reserve 
Cori)6, as soon as the interest of the public service will permit. The 
order for the discharge from hospitals should be liberally interpreted. 
The word *' patients" in telegram of May 3 was intended to include 
all enlisted men who were in hospital, except the guards and nurses 
belonging to the Veteran Reserve Corps. 

SAMUEL BRECK, 
Assistant AdjviKint-Oenerah 



War Department, Adjutant-General's Office, 

May 18, 1860, 
Col. J. A. Wilcox, 

Chief Mustering Officer, Columbus, Ohio: 

All volunteer organizations of white troops in General Sherman's 
army and the Army of the Potomac whose terms of service expire 
prior to October 1 next, have been ordered mustered out. 

The musters out are to be made in the vicinity of this city, and 
thereafter regiments and companies sent to State for payment. (See 
regulations promulgated in General Orders, No. 94, of 15th instant.) 

The troops for muster out will be: 

First. The three-years' regiments mustered into service under call 
of July 2, 1862, and prior to October 1 of that year. 

Second. Three-years' recruits mustered into service for old i-egi- 
ments between the same dates. 

Third. One-year's men for new and old organizations who entered 
the service prior to October 1, 1864. 

Your records, or those of the State adjutant-general, will furnish 
the number of troops and particular regiments to be discharged, as 
herein indicated. You should arrange a list accordingly, so that you 
will be prepared to receive and care for the troops on their arrival in 
State. 

Furnish Governor with copy of this and acknowledge receipt. 

By order of Secretary of War: 

THOMAS M. VINCENT, 

Assistant Adjutant-Oeneral. 



26 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. 

(Copy for the following chief mastering officers : Brigadier-General 
Pitcher, Indiana; Brigadier-General Oakes, Illinois; Lieutenant-Col- 
onel Grier, Iowa; Colonel Alexander, Missonri; Lieutenant-Colonel 
Lovell, Wisconsin; Lieutenant-Colonel Hill, Michigan; Colonel Ely, 
New Jersey ; Major Austine, Vermont ; Major Silvey, New Hampshire ; 
Lieutenant-Colonel Neide, Rhode Island; Lieutenant-Colonel Gilbert, 
Connecticut; Major Clarke, Massachusetts; Lieutenant-Colonel Littler, 
Maine.) 



Quartermaster-General's Office, 

Washington CUyy May 19, 1805, 
Hon. E. M. Stanton, 

Secretary of War: 

Sir: I have the honor to inclose certain papers* relative to the 
Orange and Alexandria Railroad. 

The Governor of Virginia, Hon. F. H. Peirpoint, asks that this road 
be placed in possession of certain gentlemen appointed by the Board 
of Public Works to receive it. His letter is addressed to the Secre- 
tary of War. 

Mr. John S. Barbour, president of the Orange and Alexandria 
Railroad for many years, incloses to Major-General Augur, command- 
ing the Department of Washington, an order of Major-General Ord, 
placing him in charge of that part of the railroad in the Department 
of Virginia not in use by the military authorities. 

He asks authority \o take possession of the property of the company 
in the city of Alexandria. He states that he has complied with the 
regulations, t. 6., taken the amnesty oath, and that he has held no 
military office under the rebel Government while governing the road 
during the last four years of rebellion. He claims to represent the 
stockholders. I have been advised that there are stockholders, loyal 
men of the North, whose property was seized four years ago, and who 
have not been allowed any voice in the control of the affairs of the 
road or in the election of its president or directors. I doubt whether 
taking the amnesty oath re-establishes any person elected by disloyal 
votes as the legal or equitable president of a railroad from which all 
loyal men have been excluded during the past four years. 

The State of Virginia has a Board of Public Works, charged with 
the general supervision of railroads and other public worto of the 
State. I am advised that the State holds an interest of three-fifths in 
all the railroads and canals and turnpikes. Mr. John S. Barbour, 
however, informs me that the Orange and Alexandria Railroad is an 
exception to this rule; that it is the property almost entirely, if not 
entirely, of private parties; others deny this. 

The question of the disposition of the railroads in the States lately 
in rebellion is a large one, and aft«r reflection I have the honor to 
advise that the following principles be established to govern the action 
of the Quartermaster's Department and of the military authorities in 
disposing of all of them: 

First. The United States will, as soon as it can dispense with the 
military occupation and control of any road of which the Quarter- 
master's Department is now in charge, turn it over to the parties ask- 
ing to receive it who may appear to have the best claim and be able 
to operate it in such manner as to secure the speedy movement of all 

•Omitted. 



UNION AUTHORITIES. 27 

military stores and troops. The Quartermaster-Greneral, upon the ad- 
vice of the military commander of the department, to determine when 
this can be done, subject to the approval of the Secretary of War. 

Second. No charge to be made against the railroad for expense of 
material or exx>ense of operation. 

Third. All materials for permanent way used in the repair and con- 
struction of the road and all damaged material of this class which 
maybe left along its route, having been thrown there during the oper- 
ations of destruction or repair, to be considered as part of the road and 
given up vrith it. 

Fourth. No payment or credit to be given to the railroad for its 
occupation or use by the United States during the continuance of the 
military necessity which compelled the United States to take posses- 
sion of it by capture from the public enemy. The recovery of the road 
from the public enemy and its return to loyal owners, with the vast 
expenditure of defense and repair, are a full equivalent for itb use. 

Fifth. All movable property, including rolling-stock of all kinds, 
the property of the United States, to be sold at auction, after full 
public notice, to the highest bidder. 

Sixth. All rolling-stock and material, the property before the war 
of railroads, and captured by the forces of the United States, to be 
placed at the disposal of the roads which originally owned it, and to 
be given up to these roads as soon as it can be spared and they appear 
by pro];)er agents authorized to receive it. 

Seventh. When a State has a board of public works able and will- 
ing to take charge of its railroads, the railroads in possession of the 
Quartermaster's Department to be given up to this board of public 
works, leaving it to the State authorities and to the judicial tribunals 
to regulate all questions of property between rival boards, agents, or 
stockholders. 

Eighth. Roads not being operated by the U. S. Quartermaster's 
Department not to be interfered with unless under military necessity, 
such roads to be left in possession of such persons as may now have 
possession, subject only to the removal of every agent, director, pres- 
ident, superintendent, or operative who has not taken the oath of 
allegiance to the United States, which rule should be rigidly enforced. 

Ninth. When the superintendents in actual possession decline to 
take such oath, some competent person to be apx)ointed as receiver of 
the railroad, who shall administer the affairs of the road and account 
for its receipts to the board of directors who may be formally recog- 
nized as the legal and loyal board of managers. This receiver to he 
appointed, as in the case of other abandoned property, by the Treas- 
ury Department. 

Tenth. I recommend that the Governor of the State of Virginia be 
informed that the War Department will interpose no obstacle to the 
Board of Public Works of the State taking possession of all the rail- 
roads in the State not in use and occupation of the military forces of 
the United States by the Quartermaster's Department, and that as 
soon as the military occupation of any of these roads can be safely 
dispensed with the road will be transferred to the charge of the Board 
of Public Works. 

In some of the States the State is a large bondholder in the roads, 
and though there may be in such States no board of public works, it 
is probable that the State authorities will be willing to receive and 
take charge of the roads. If not, receivers should be appointed by 



28 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. 

the Treasury Department, upon application of the War Department, 
to take charge of tliem as abandoned property. 
I have the honor to be, very respectfully, 

M. C. MEIGS, 

Quartermasfer' General and Brevet Major- Oeneral. 



Headquarters Armies of the United States, 

Washington, D, C, May 19, 1866. 
Brig. Gen. B. W. Brice, 

Paymaster- General of the Army: 
General: The lieutenant-general desires to know about what 
time the troops in and around Richmond, and the armies commanded 
respectively by Generals Sherman and Meade, and now in the vicinity 
of Washington, will be paid. 
Will you please furnish the desired information ? 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

JNO. A. RAWLINS, 
Brigadier- General and Chief of Sfa^ff. 



War Department, Paymaster-General's Office, 

Washington, May SO, 1866. 
General John A. Rawlins, 

Chief of Staff, &c.: 
Sir: Youi-s of yesterday this moment received, and I have the honor 
to I'eply : 

All the efforts of the Treasury have been directed for the past two 
weeks to the means necessary for the final payment of troops ordered 
to be mustei'ed out, amounting, according to the Adjutant-General's 
lists, to about 123,000 men, all told. The payment of these, with the 
large arrears due, the large bounties due, and three months' extra to 
oflficers, will require about $50,000,000. 

These payments w^ill be met promptly and without peradventure, 
the Treasury having very nearly, if not quite, met the emergency. 

It will depend upon the ability of the Treasury entirely as to the 
time when the payments about which you inquire can be made. I 
will have an early conference with the officers of that Department and 
endeavor to give you an early response. 

In addition to the f oi-ces named, I regret to say that General Thomas' 
command, in the West, is yet unpaid since August 31 last. The 
Army of the Potomac and troops about Richmond have been paid to 
December 31. Therefore, after Sherman's army, paid to August 31, 
Thomas' should be next paid. All these payments you will readily 
I)erceive will require a very large sum of money to be yet provided. 
I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

B. W. BRICE, 
Paymaster-General U. 8, Army. 



War Department, Adjutant-General's Office, 

May 20, 1866. 
Governor of Maine: 

Under the regulations established by the Secretary of War and the 
orders from this office based thereon, troops about to be discharged 



UNION AUTHORITIES. 29 

should go out of service promptly, be properly cared for, and their 
interests fully protected in every respect. Should delinquencies on 
the part of officers charged with execution of details come to your 
notice, I will thank you to advise me of the same at once, giving name 
of neglectful parties, so that a remedy may be applied. 

THOMAS M. VINCENT, 

Assistant AdftUarU-Qeneral, 

(Same to Governors of New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, 
Rhode Island, Ck>nnecticut, New York, New Jersey, Delaware, Penn- 
sylvania, Maryland, West Virginia, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Iowa, 
Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Kansas, Missouri, and Kentucky.) 



MiiJTABT Division of thb Mississippi, 
Chief Enginbsb's Officb U. S. Militabt Railroads, 

New Beme, N. C, May m, 1866. 
General D. C. McCallum, 

MU, Director and Genl. Manager Bailroads, United States: 

GbnbraIi: I have the honor to submit the following report of oper- 
ations on the U. S. military railroads under my charge since the date 
of my last report, November 1, 1864.* 

After General Sherman's army was fully supplied at Atlanta he 
cut loose from his railroad line of supply and we fell back with all 
rolling-stock and other portable railroad property to Chattanooga, 
stopping long enough, however, to take up the track between Resaca 
and Dalton, a distance of eighteen miles, and bring to Chattanooga 
all the iron rails, including those damaged by the enemy in his last 
attack on the road. The Construction Corps was then distributed 
over the lines of military railroads still held by our forces, and 
employed at various necessary jobs of construction and repairs and 
in preparing material to reconstruct any portion of the tracks and 
structures that might again be destroyed. This work was continued 
until the rebel army under General Hood had advanced so far north 
of the Tennessee River that it became evident most, if not all, our 
lines would fall into their hands. The greater part of the corps was 
then concentrated at certain points from which they could operate to 
the best advantage when we should again get possession of the roads. 
One division of trackmen was sent to Louisville to lay additional 
tracks to hold the large number of cars and engines which we were 
sending there for safety. On the 15th of December, the battle of 
Nashville commenced, and bj' the 18th General Thomas had thor- 
oughly defeated Hood and driven his shattered army as far as 
Franklin. On that day he directed all the damaged railroads to be 
rebuilt. On the 19th I had four strong working parties at this work — 
one working from Nashville toward Decatur and following the army 
as rapidly as possible; another working from Nashville toward Ste- 
venson; a third working from Stevenson toward Nashville, and the 
fourth working from Stevenson toward Decatur. These lines were 
all opened up, except a portion of the Nashville and Decatur line, by 
the 28th of December, the day I received your order to take one 
division of the Construction Corps and proceed to Savannah to join 
General Sherman. Orders were immediately given on the receipt of 

*See Incloflure B to report of General McCallum of November 27, 1864, Vol. IV, 
thiB series, p. 957. 



30 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. 

your dispatch for the Second Division to prepare for the journey, and 
they left Nashville on the 4th of January for Baltimore, fully 
equipped for any kind of railroad work. Arriving in Baltimore on 
the 10th, there was a delay of eight days before a vessel could be 
furnished to take them to Savannah. On the 2dth they arrived at 
Hilton Head, but were not disembarked there. On the 29th General 
Sherman gave me orders to proceed with my men to Morehead City, 
N. C, and "prepare to make railroad connection to Goldsborough by 
the middle of March." 

We left Hilton Head on the 3d and arrived off Morehead City on 
the 5th of February. The men and railroad supplies brought with 
us were landed next day. We found the railroad in running order 
from Morehead City to Batchelder^s Creek, a distance of forty-four 
miles. The track, however, was in bad condition, and the sidings 
were entirely inadequate to the business about to be thrown upon the 
road. The wharf at Morehead City had not half the capacity required 
for unloading vessels, and there was not fifty cords of wood on the 
whole road for railroad use. The equipment of the road consisted of 
sixty-two cars and three locomotives in running order, and nine cars 
and two locomotives unfit for use without repairs. I appointed J. B. 
Van Dyne, esq., superintendent of transportation and William Cess- 
ford master mechanic, and they went to work at once to organize their 
respective departments. The Construction Corps, under Mr. Smeed, 
division engineer, was put to work repairing main track and extend- 
ing old sidings and laying new ones where required; preparing cross- 
ties, bridge timber, saw logs, piles, and wharf timber; building and 
repairing water-tanks, and other necessary work preparatory to an 
extension of the road and conducting a large business. Arrange- 
ments were made for an ample supply of wood. I found Mr. McAlpine 
on the road with a small construction force; they had repaired a few 
hundred yards of track and almost completed the bridge over Batch- 
elder's Creek. He had been sent here by order of General Grant, but 
as soon as we arrived he considered himself relieved and returned at 
once to Virginia with his men. Mr. McAlpine had brought some 
little railroad iron and a few cross-ties with him from Virginia, but 
with this exception we found the road destitute of materials and tools 
necessary for construction and repaire and for operating it. Accord- 
ingly requisitions for the necessary amount of these supplies, together 
with the probable additional amount of rolling-stock that would be 
required, were sent at once to your office. Having received orders on 
the 17th of February to build a new wharf of considerable dimensions 
at Morehead City, I also made requisition for two steam pile drivers 
and such material for this purpose as could not be procured here. 
On the 3d of March General Cox (who was in command of the column 
that moved from here) commenced his advance toward Goldsborough. 
He was poorly supplied with wagon transportation, and thei^efore had 
to depend upon the railroad almost entirely. The construction of the 
railroad kept pace with the advance of the troops, and the supplies 
were moved by rail from camp to camp and unloaded from the main 
track as the troops marched up the road. Of course track laying 
could not advance so rapidly under such circumstances as if the track 
had been kept clear for construction purposes; but still the progress 
was very satisfactory. This mode of advance and movement of sup- 
plies was continued until we reached a point on the railroad opposite 
the battle-field of Wise's Cross-Roads. Here we made a temporary 
depot, and (a supply of wagon transportation having arrived) stores 



UNION AUTHORITIES. 31 

were hauled in wagons to Kinston, to which point General Scliofield 
(who had arrived and taken command) pushed forward with his army 
immediately after the battle. From a short distance beyond Batch- 
elder's Creek we had found the track thus far taken up and the rails 
carried away and all the bridges and water stations destroyed. An 
examination of the road beyond showed it to be in the same condition 
as far as Kinston. 

The enemy having fallen back to or beyond Goldsborough, and 
General Couch's command having arrived from Wilmington, General 
Schofield desired to accumulate the necessary supplies as rapidly as 
possible so as to enable him to push forward and make the pre- 
arranged junction with General Sherman's army at Goldsborough by 
the "middle of March." It became, therefore, a matter of utmost 
imxM>rtance to push forward the work on the railroad with utmost 
rapidity (at least as far as the Neuse River), and the Third Division 
of ttie Construction Corps having arrived, I was enabled from this 
time to keep the work going night and day. Most of the cross-ties 
used up to this time in the new track had been cut alongside the 
railroad and carried onto the road bed. It became necessary to cut 
these ties because we had not cars and engines to spare from hauling 
army supplies to bring up the stock previously prepared at points 
back on the railroad, and they had to be carried to the place where 
used because our ox teams could not cross the deep and wide ditch, 
mostly full of water, on both sides of the road bed. Not having men 
enough to cut and carry ties as fast as we could put down the rails, I 
applied to General Schofield for a detail of soldiers to assist. He 
ordered the detail made, and they worked two days, in that time 
getting out and bringing to the road 6,400 ties. We reached Neuse 
River with the track on the 20th of March, and the same day com- 
menced running supplies to that X)oint with all the cars and engines 
we had. The Neuse River bridge was completed on the 23d, and the 
track between it and Kinston having been laid while the bridge' was 
building, the construction force moved forward, and, building two 
bridges and doing some other work by the way, reached Goldsborough 
late in the night of the 24th, but, in consequence of having to repair 
a small piece of track at the edge of town, did not reach the depot 
until 3 a. m. on the 25th. General Sherman's army had all reached 
the place of meeting on the previous daj'. The construction force 
was now sent forward to oi)en up the road to Wilmington, while the 
whole energies of the transportation department were concentrated 
in an effort to supply the present wants of the large army which had 
assembled in and around Goldsborough after its long march from 
Savannah, and in addition to accumulate supplies by the 10th of 
April for the contemplated movement on that day. Of course until 
the Wilmington line could be opened we had to depend upon the 
Morehead City line alone. 

Knowing General Sherman's punctuality, I was much concerned for 
fear that with the small amount of rolling-stock on hand it would be 
impossible to accomplish the work required of us within the time 
named; but by good management and good luck I am happy to state 
that on the evening of the 9th the chief quartermaster and the chief 
commissary of subsistence informed me that the whole army was 
supplied with everything required for the movement next day. I 
attribute the result partly to good luck, because, although every 
wheel we had was kept turning night and day during this period, we 
were so fortunate as not to have a single accident. The disabling of a 



32 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. 

single locomotive or a few cars would have been an irreparable loss. 
It seems almost incredible that this work was done; that about 150 
car-loads in excess of enough supplies for Sherman's army were moved 
in fourteen days from Morehead City and New Berne to Goldsborough 
with only eighty-seven cars and five engines up to April 1, and same 
number of cars and six engines after that date. The repairs to the 
Wilmington road were completed on the 4th of April; the trains com- 
menced running the same day. The few cars and the two engines 
that had arrived at Wilmington up to this date were used in supply- 
ing General Terry's command, which lay along this road pending the 
movement on Raleigh. 

On the 10th of April the work of reconstruction commenced on the 
Goldsborough and Raleigh line. This was found to be much heavier 
than was anticipated, for the enemy, having obtained information, 
probably, of the direction in which Sherman was going to move, had 
within a day or two previous torn up and destroyed about eight miles 
of track and filled up some of the cuts with trees, brush, logs, rocks, 
and earth. We were until the 19th in repairing this damaged track 
and in rebuilding the Little River and Neuse River bridges. On the 
evening of that day we ran into Raleigh with the construction trains, 
follow^ closely by two train-loads of supplies. During the armis- 
tice our trains were kept going day and night bringing forward full 
supplies for the army, either for a resumption of hostilities or a march 
homeward. On the 25th, when General Sherman informed me that 
"the army moves to-morrow against the enemy in the direction of 
Greensborough and Salisbury," the wagons were again fully loaded, 
and there was, in addition, a considerable accumulation of stores at 
Raleigh. The addition of our rolling-stock received from the North, 
together with some captured stock that was serviceable, enabled us to 
get forward the stores with comparative ease, now, and also carry on 
construction and repairs. It was a great relief to know that we had 
the means to do our work, and feel that an accident to one train would 
not necessarily disarrange the whole plans of the campaign. But, 
although we had rolling-stock enough for present use, we had not 
enough should the army advance on Greensborough and Salisbury. 
I therefore, on the 2l8t of April, went out to Cedar Creek, on the 
Raleigh and Gaston Railroad, twenty-five miles from Raleigh, to 
meet the president of that company and see if we could borrow some 
stock from them. By direction of General Sherman I agreed with 
him to rebuild the bridge over Cedar Creek for the use of four loco- 
motives and forty cars for as long a time as they might be required 
for military purposes. We built the bridge, but the surrender of 
Johnston and the arrival of more stock from the North made it unnec- 
essary to call on that company for the fulfillment of their part of the 
contract. The rebuilding of Cedar Creek bridge completed the rail- 
road connection between Raleigh and the Roanoke River at Gaston 
and aLso at Weldon. During the suspension of hostilities we operated 
the Nprth Carolina Railroad to Durham's Station, twenty-five miles 
from Raleigh. 

Immediately upon Johnston's surrender I was ordered to rebuild 
the Flat Creek bridge, some ten miles beyond Durham, which opened 
the road to Salisbury. And our army being fully supplied, a large 
amount of stores were sent up the North Carelina Railroad for use 
of the force which had just surrendered during the time required to 
parole the men. Sherman's army having marched north, and John- 
ston's army having been disbanded, there was left in this department 
only General Sehofield's command to supply. Compared with the 



UNION AUTHORITIES. 33 

business which we had been doing, this was but a small thing, and, 
in accordance with your order, arrangements were at once made to 
rednee the force employed in the transportation and machine depart- 
ments to the smallest numbers possible to do the work. Also in 
accordance with your orders the Construction Corps was disbanded, 
and the force employed on maintenance of way and structures much 
reduced. Under these orders about two-thirds of all the railroad 
employ&i in this department were discharged and expenses reduced 
accordingly. It is with no little regret that I part with the Construc- 
tion Corps, which I have taken such pains to organize and train for 
military railroad service; but at the same time that I feel this regret 
I rejoice that the necessity for this organization and their services no 
longer exist, and that having done their work they can now be dis- 
banded and go home. Since landing at Morehead City, on the 6th of 
February, we have, in addition to keeping up the superstructure, 
bridges, water stations, and other work connected with maintenance 
of way, built about thirty-three miles of new track, including sidings 
and track laid for the reception of the wide-gauge stock that was to 
have been sent here. 
We have built the following-named bridges: 

Length (feet). 

Batchelder'8 Creek, Morehead City, Gtoldsboroogh and Raleigh Railroad . . 70 

Core Creek, Morehead City, Gk>ld0boroagh and Raleifl^ Railroad 100 

Soathwest Creek, Morehead City, Goldsborough and Raleigh Railroad 65 

Nense River, No. 1, Morehead CHty, Goldsboroagh and Raleig:h Railroad _ . 868 

Falling Water Creek, Morehead City, Goldsborongh and Raleigh Railroad. 70 

Bear Creek, Morehead City, Gk>ldBborotigh and Rialeiffh Railroad 100 

Little River, Morehead City, Gtoldsborotiffh and Raleiffh Railroad 150 

Xense River, No. 2, Morehead City, Gtoldsboroogh and Aaleigh Railroad. . . 814 

Nense River, No. 3, Wilmington and Goldsborongh Railroad 236 

Northeast River, Wilmington and Goldsborongh Railroad . '. 872 

Cedar Creek.Raleigh and Gaston Railroad.... 682 

Flat Creek, North Carolina Railroad 100 

Total 2,991 

The timber consumed in the construction of these bridges is as 
follows: 

7eet,B.3L 

Batchelder's Creek 10,600 

Core Creek 15,000 

Southwest Creek ' 12,750 

Neose River, No. 1 146,710 

Falling Water Creek 10,500 

Bear Creek 15,000 

Little River 25,500 

NcuseRiver,No.2 62,800 

NeiiBeRiver,No.3 89,950 

NorOieast River 111,600 

Cedar Creek 819,200 

Flat Creek 10,000 

Total 779,510 

The new wharf at Morehead City was completed in time to be of 
much service in discharging vessels. There is room now for seven or 
eight vessels to lie at these wharves at the same time, and any vessel 
that can cross the bar can come to the wharf. The depth of water on 
the bar is fourteen and one-half feet. The area of the new wharf is 
53,682 square feet, or very nearly one acre and a quarter. The cost of 
labor in its construction amounted to $32,086. The amount of timber 
consumed, 700,000 feet, board measure. The following summarv of 

3 R R— SERIES in, VOL V 



34 



CORKESPONDENCEy ETC. 



timber consnmed in the different stmctnres on the roads is given. All 
other materials^ except cross-ties and railroad iron, is, or should be, 
accounted for in the store-house report: 

Timber and lumber consumed, 

Faet.B.lC 

Bridges 779,510 

Water-tanks 26,100 

CWb-work (Morehead City) ... 66,000 

Wharf 700.000 

Buildings , 88,000 

Total 1,603,610 

The total number of cross-ties used in new track and on repairs was 
111,100. 

For information in regard to the timber, wood, cross-ties, Ac., now 
on hand, see Exhibit B (report of J. M. Lindley, wood and tie agent), 
attached to this report.* Not having been furnished with an account 
of the railroad iron sent here, I cannot make an accurate report of the 
amount consumed. For the new track laid we straightened and used 
a great deal of damaged iron. In many cases wo had to lay without 
chairs, because those sent with the iron did not fit it. Your attention 
is called to Exhibit A, attached tc this report (the store-house report 
signed by Captain Starkweather).* It purports to give the amount of 
stores and materials received, consumed, and remaining on hand. 
The report is evidently inaccurate in regard to lumber and some other 
items. It is also proper to state that many of the tools and other 
articles reported as on hand are worn out and worthless. . Exhibit C 
contains accurate plans of all bridges built, together with a plan of 
the wharves at Morehead City. * Below please find tabular statements 
of cars and engines on the military railroads in this department. And 
here I take occasion to say that nearly all the captured stock is worth- 
less. Very little of it is worth even temporary repairs. Of course the 
best was run off to escape capture, but since ^he ^^ rebellion has been 
crushed," and the different railroad companies have commenced oper- 
ating their roads again, much of this ha^ made its appearance, and we 
have thus had a good opportunity to judge of the condition of the 
rolling-stock in the "Confederacy." It was nearly worn out. A tabu- 
lar statement is also given of the loaded cars moved on the military rail- 
roads in this department during seventy-four days ending May 1, 1865. 

LUt of engines on Morehead City and Ooldtborough Line ( U, S, military railroad 

stock). 



No. 


Name. 


Boilder. 


Condition. 


When 

received. 




Blue Bird 


Baldwin 


Banning order 

. ...do 


Mar 19 




Union 


do 


Apr. 1 
Apr. 96 

Feb 9 




VolMii 


do 


do 






Korrit 


do 




Reindeer 


do 


Need repairs 




Seeratery 


Tannton 


Ronning order 

.....do 


Apr. 96 
Apr. 14 
Feb 9 




GrmoeShot 


do 




Chief 


do 


Nised repairs 




Scoot 


Jersey City 


Ao -- 


Feb 9 


10 


CoRiniodore ....... . ....•• 


Smith it Jackson 

do 


Good order. ........ . 


May 1 

Apr. 14 
Feb 25 


11 


Lion 


do 


12 


Colonel Weheter. ... ... 


Manchester . r . r - - . . r . 


Need repairs 


in 


Ancient 


Norri* 


do 


Feb. 9 













•Omitted. 



UNION AUTHOBrriES. 
Captured on Cfoldtborough and Raleigh Line, 



35 



Ko. 


ir».. 


Bnilder. 


Condition. 


When 
received. 


1 
2 
3 


TT%)if»x 


Korrii 


KeedreiMlrB 


Apr. 19 
Apr. 19 
Apr. 19 




do 


WorthlMS . . 


lUMrh 


do 


Neod repairs 









NoTS.— BBjrine Ancient on Horebead City «nd Goldtborongh Line not fit for roed is used %% More* 
head City. Engines Halifax and Raleigh are only senrloeable as switch engines and are need in that 
capacity at Raleigh. 

Statement of cars on U, 8. military railroads, 

HOREHEAD CITY AND GOLDSBOROUOH LINB (U. S. MILITARY RAILROAD STOCK). 



1 

S5 


Description. 


Condition. 


"When 
reoeiTed. 


n 






F^b. 9 


11 


Box-cani 


do 


Feb. 9 


11 


Raek-cars 


do 


Feb. 9 


J\ 


Flat-cars 


do 


Feb 9 


10 


.. do 


Bad order 


Feb. 9 


25 
15 
SO 


... Ho 


Rnnning order .............. ... 


a Mar 19 


do 


do , 


6Apr. 4 

cApr. 26 


do 


do , 







a At Morehead City. b From Wilmington and Goldsborongh. e At New Berne. 

WILMINGTON AND GOLDSBOROUGH LINE (CAPTURED STOCK). 



4 Pasaencer-cara 


Bad Older 


Apr. 4 
Apr. 4 
Apr. 4 
Apr. 4 
Apr. 4 


J f^ do^.TT:.::::::::.:.:::::;:.::..:... 


Unsenriceable 


5 BaiTFafl^cara 


Bad order 


4 t Box-cars ............. 


do « 


7 1 Flat-cacB 


do 









Raleigh and Oaston Railroad (captured stock 


of different roads). 


1 
i 


Deaeription. 


Condition. 


When 
received. 


^ 


Pasafmrcn* cars 


Bad order 




Apr. 22 
Apr. 22 
Apr. 22 
Apr. 22 
Apr. 22 
Apr. 22 


1 




do 


tr 


Box-cars. • ....r. ........ 


do 


14 


do 


Unserviceable.... 


1 


Rack-car 


Bad order 


74 


Flat<:ara 


do - 









List of captured engines on the Wilmington and Ooldaborough Line, 



Na 



Name. 



Builder. 



Condition. 



When 
received. 



Wilmington 

Penflreranoe 

Goldaborongh 

Orange 

Govemdh* Ellis 

PrasideDt 

QaickBtep 

Job Terry 

SIODewall Jackson . 

BmuAirick 

North Carolina 

Tarborongh 

Unknown 



Maoobetter. . 
Baldwin 

Manchester. . 



Baldwin 

Norris 

do 

Hinkley.... 

Norris: 

do 

Baldwin 

Anderson — 
Manchester.. 



Rnnning order. 

.....do." 

Need repairs — 
Beiiup repaired.. 

Worthless'...!.. 

do 

....do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 



Mar. 26 

Mar. 26 

Mar. 26 

Mar. 26 

Mar. 26 

Mar. 26 

Mar. 26 

Mar. 26 

Mar. 26 

Mar. 26 

Mar. 26 

Mar. 26 

Mar. 26 



Nan.— Noa. 1, 2, and 3 are m use, hot not considered serviceable. 



86 



CORRE8FONDEMCB, ETO. 



StiUement of loaded cars forwarded and received from February 15 to May 1, 1865. 

FORWARDED. 



From— 


To- 


Number. 


Contente. 


irorohMd Clt7 


F»t>iit 

do 


1,641 
850 

no 

400 


Stores. 


Vvw Berne.. r......... 


Do, 


WilmlnKtoii 


....do 


Do. 


Moreheii!! City 


....do 


Troop*. 






Total 


8,201 











BBCEiySD. 



Komber. 



Contenta. 



Kew Berne 

Horeheed Cl^ . 
Wilmington — 

Vew 



Front 

...do 

Goldsbor- 

ouffh. 
Varlona 



773 
209 
88 



Do 

Total. 



Front. 



Unknown. 
Do. 
Do. 

Wood. 



800 Baggage,^ 
*1,765 j 



Kon— Two hundred care atorea ftom dock to Monkead City; 1«M1 oara oonatruction material 
moved an average distance of thirty miles. 

RECAPITULATION. 

Senttotheftont 8.201 

Beceived at New Berne 1,373 

Received at Morebead City 2» 

Received at Wilmington 88 

Construction material 1,541 

Traaaferring atorea 200 

Total number loaded cars forwarded and received 0,887 

The following statement of cost of labor is taken from the pay- 
rolls and embraces the whole time since the Second Division left 
Nashville until the Construction Corps was disbanded ; that is, from 
January 1 to May 15, 1865: 

Cost of labor on U, 8. military railroads. Military Division oj the Mississippi, in 
the Departm£nt of North Carolina, 1866, 





January. 


February. 


March. 


April. 


May. 


Construction and maintenance 

Machine deimrtment k.... 


192.083.01 
4.700.09 
5.023.00 


$128,377.00 
8, 568. SO 


$191,131.11 


$176,433.86 
27.697.21 
14,582.48 


$48,028.06 
0,431 84 




6.972.55 1 15,116.98 


8 423.00 






Total 


101,905.70 


142,919. 10 1 '223. fUU. 16 


218.713.65 


57,882.89 









Total, $745, 005. 40. 

Names of U, S, viUitary railroads. Department of North Carolina. 



Horehead City and GoldsborotiRh lino _ 85 

Wilmington and Gk>ld8boroagh line 85 

Gk>]d8boronflrh and Raleigh line 48 

North Carolina, Raleigh to Hillsborough 40 

Raleigh and Gaston, Raleigh to Cedar Creek 25 



Total. 



2d8 



UNION AUTHORITIES. 87 

In closing this report it gives me great pleasure to again bear tes- 
timony to the hearty and effective co-operation of the chief quarter- 
master and the chief commissary of subsistence Military Division of 
the 3iississippi, Generals L. C. Easton and A. Beckwith, in all our 
operations. We have worked together for so long a time, under .snch 
a variety of circumstances, and over such an extent of territory, that 
we have learned how to suppl}'^ a large army by railroad. Nothing 
but this knowledge and perfect harmony of action enabled us, with 
our limited railroad facilities, to make operations in this department 
a success. To my assistants great credit is due for this success. J. B. 
Van Dy^ne, superintendent of transportation, has shown good tact, 
skill, and untiring industry in his department. E. C. Smeed, division 
engineer, has ably assisted me in the maintenance of way and con- 
struction department. William Cessford, master mechanic, by his 
mechanical skill and indefatigable efforts to keep in repair our hard- 
worked rolling-stock, did excellent service. I commend the services 
of these gentlemen, together with many othera holding subordinate 
positions, which the limits of this rei)ort preclude me from naming, to 
your consideration. 

Exhibit D shows the present organization in the military railroads 
in this department.* 

I have the honor to be, verv respectfully, your obedient servant, 

W. W. WRIGHT, 
Chief Engineer Military Railroads, IXv. of the Miss., 
In charge Military Railroads^ Dept. of North Carolina. 



General Orders, ) War Dept., Adjt. General's Office, 

No. 99. J Washingt/JH, May '28, 1865, 

I. In oi-der to recruit the ranks of the regular regiments as soon as 
practicable, the Adjutant-General will open recruiting stations at 
such x>oints as offer a reasonable prospect of enlisting good men. 

II. Volunteers honorably discharged from the U. S. service who 
enlist in the Regular Array within ten days from date of discharge 
will be allowed a furlough of thirty days before joining their regi- 
ments. They will be paid all pay and allowances to which they may 
be entitled on being discharged from the volunteer service. 

By order of the Secretary of War: 

E. D. TOWNSENB, 
Assistant Adjutant- Oeneral. 



[May 29, 1865. — For amnesty proclamation of the President, and 
circular of Department of State establishing rules and regulations 
for administering and recording the amnesty oath, see Series II, Vol. 
Vm, p. 578.] 



By the President of the United States op America: 

A proclamation. 

Whereas, tlie fourth section of the fourth article of the Constitution 
of the United States declares that the United States shall guarantee 

♦Omitted. 



88 COBBESPONDENCEy ETC. 

to eveiy State in the Union a republican form of government, and 
shall protect each of them against invasion and domestic violence; 
and whereas, the President of the United States is, by the Constitution, 
made Commander-in-Chief of the Army and Navy, as well as chief civil 
Execjiitive officer of the United States, and is bound by solemn oath 
faithfully to execute the office of President of the United States, and 
to take care that the laws be faithfully executed; and whereas, the 
rebellion which has been waged by a portion of the people of the 
United States against the proi)erly constituted authorities of the Gov- 
ernment thereof, in the most violent and revolting form, but whose 
Qrganized and armed forces have now been almost entirely overcome, 
has, in its revolutionary progress, deprived the i>eople of the State of 
North Carolina of all civil government; and whereas, it becomes 
necessary and proi)er to carry out and enforce the obligations of the 
United States to the x>6ople of North Carolina, in securing them in 
the enjoyment of a republican form of government: 

Now, therefore, in obedience to the high and solemn duties imi)06ed 
upon me by the Constitution of the United States, and for the pur- 
pose of enabling the loyal i)eople of said State to organize a State 
Government, whereby justice may be established, domestic tranquillity 
insured, and loyal citizens protected in all their rights of life, liberty, 
and property, I, Andrew Johnson, President of the United States and 
Commander-in-Chief of the Army and Navy of the United States, do 
hereby appoint William W. Holden Provisional Governor of the State 
of North Carolina, whose duty it shall be at the earliest practical 
X)eriod to prescribe such rules and regulations as may be necessary and 
proper for convening a convention, composed of delegates to be chosen 
by that portion of the i)eople of said State who are loyal to the United 
States, and no others, for the purpose of altering or amending the 
constitution thereof; and with authority to exercise, within the limits 
of said State, all the powers necessary and proper to enable such loyal 
people of the State of North Carolina to restore said State to its con- 
stitutional relations to the Federal Gcovemmfent, and to present such 
a republican form of State government as will entitle the State to the 
guaranty of the United States therefor, and its people to protection 
by the United States against invasion, insurrection, and domestic 
violence : Provided^ That in any election that may be hereafter held 
for choosing delegates to any State convention as aforesaid no person 
shall be qualified as an elector or shall be eligible as a member of such 
convention unless he shall have previously taken and subscribed the 
oath of amnesty, as set forth in the President's proclamation of May 
twenty-ninth, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and 
sixty-five, and is a voter qualified as prescribed by the constitution and 
laws of the State of North Carolina in force immediately before the 
twentieth day of May, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight 
hundred and sixty-one, the date of the so-called ordinance of secession; 
and the said convention when convened, or the legislature that may 
be thereafter assembled, will prescribe the qualification of electors, 
and the eligibilit}' of persons to hold office under the constitution and 
laws of the State, a power the people of the several States composing 
the Federal Union have rightfully exercised from the origin of the 
Government to the present time. 

And I do hereby direct — 

First. That the military commander of the department, and all 
officers and persons in the military and naval service, aid and assist 



UKION AUTHOEITIES. 89 

the said Provisional Grovernor in carrying into effect this proclamation, 
and they are enjoined to abstain from in any way hindering, impeding, 
or discouraging the loyal people from the organization of a State gov- 
ernment as herein authorized. 

Second. That the Secretary of State proceed to put in force all laws 
of the United States, the administration whereof belongs to the State 
Department, applicable to the geogi*aphical limits aforesaid. 

Third. That the Secretary of the Treasury proceed to nominate for 
appointment assessors of taxes, and collectors of customs and inter- 
nal revenue, and such other officers of the Treasury Department as 
are authorized by law, and put in execution the revenue laws of the 
United States within the geographical limits aforesaid. In making 
appointments the preference shall be given to qualified loyal persons 
residing within the districts where their respective duties are to be 
performed. But if suitable residents of the districts shall not be 
found, then x)er8ons residing in other States or districts shall be 
appointed. 

Fourth. That the Postmaster-General proceed to establish post- 
offices and post routes, and put into execution the postal laws of the 
United States within the said State, giving to loyal residents the 
preference of appointment; but if suitable residents are not found, 
then to appoint agents, Jbc, from other States. 

Fifth. That the district judge for the judicial district in which 
North Carolina is included proceed to hold courts within said State 
in accordance with the provisions of the act of Congress. The 
Attorney-General will instruct the proper officers to libel, and to bring 
to judgment, confiscation, and sale, property subject to confiscation, 
and enforce the administration of justice within said State in all 
matters within the cognizance and jurisdiction of the Federal courts. 

Sixth. That the Secretary of the Navy take possession of all public 
property belonging to the Navy Department within said geographical 
limits, and put in operation all acts of Congress in relation to naval 
affairs having application to the said State. 

Seventh. That the Secretary of the Interior put in force the laws 
relating to the Interior Department applicable to the geographical 
limits aforesaid. 

In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the 
seal of the United States to be affixed. 

Done at the city of Washington this twentj'-ninth day of May, in 
the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-five, and of 
the Independence of the United States the eighty-ninth. 

[l. S.1 ANDREW JOHNSON. 

by the F^resident: 

WILLIAM II. SEWARD, 

Secretary of State, 

(Same, mviaiis mutandiSy issued for the State of Mississippi, June 
13, 1865; for the States of Georgia and Texas (separate proclama- 
tions) June 17, 1865; for the State of Alabama, June 21, 18G5; for the 
Sute of South Carolina, June 30, 18C5, and for the State of 'Florida, 
Julv 13, 1865. 

William L. Sharkey was appointed Provisional Governor of Mis- 
sissippi, James Johnson for Georgia, Andrew J. Hamilton for Texas, 
Lewis E. Parsons for Alabama, Benjamin F. Perry for South Caro- 
lina, and William Marvin for Florida.) 



42 C0BBE8P0NDEVCB, ETC. 

Fifth. All other movable property, including rolling-stock of all 
kinds, the property of the United States, to be sold at auction after 
full public notice to the highest bidder. 

Sixth. All rolling-stock and materials of railroads oaptpred by the 
forces of the United States, and not consumed, destroyed, or per- 
manently fixed elsewhere, as, for instance, when captured iron has 
been laid upon other roads, shall be placed at the disposal of the 
roads which originally owned the same, and shall be given up to these 
roads as soon as it can be spared, and they appear by proper agents 
authorized to receive it. 

Sevenths No payment or credit shall be given to any railroad recap- 
tured from the public enemy for its occupation or use by the United 
States during the continuance of the military necessity which com- 
pelled the United States to take x>osses8loniof it; but its capture and 
restoration shall be deemed a sufficient consideration for ^11 such use; 
nor shall any indemnity be paid for injuries done to tJie property of 
any road by the forces of the United States; during the continuance 
of the war. 

Eighth. Roads which have not been operated by the U. S. Quar- 
termaster's Department not to be interfered with unless under mil- 
itary necessity, such roads to be left in possession of such persons as 
may now have possession, subject only to the removal of every ag^t, 
director, president, sui)erintendent, or operative who has not taken 
the oath of allegiance to the United States. 

Ninth. When superintendents in actual possession decline to take 
the oath, some competent person shall be appointed as receiver of the 
road, who shall administer its affairs and account for its receipts to 
the board of directors, who may be formally recognized as the legal 
and loyal board of managers; the receiver to be appointed by the 
Treasuiy Department, as in the case of abandoned property. 
I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

C. A. DANA, 
Assistant Secretary of War. 



War Department, Adjutant-General's Office, 

May 29, 1866. 
Governor of Maine: 

Refen'ing to my telegram of May 18, 1 have the honor to inform you 
that the order for muster out of volunteer white troops (except Vet- 
eran Reserve Corps) whose terms expire prior to October 1 next has 
been extended to include all armies and departments. 

THOMAS M. VINCENT, 

AssistarU Adjutant O^neroL 

(Same to Governors of New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, 
Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Delaware, Penn- 
sylvania, Maryland, West Virginia, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Iowa, 
Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Missouri, and Kentucky.) 



War Department, Adjutant-General's Office, 

Washington, May 29, 1866. 
Department Commanders: 

Please announce that General Orders, No. 36, of 1862, with the three 
notes attached relating to discharge of the sick, will be applied in all 



UNION AUTH0RITIB8. 48 

siinilar eases, as, for instance, in the case of discharges under General 
Orders, No. 77, of 1865. There appears to be some misunderstanding 
in TegBod to it. This does not change regulations and orders as to who 
shall be mustered out and who discharged for disability, but 'only 
applies General Orders, No. 36, of 1862, to x>artial payments, descrip- 
tiye Usts, transportation, &g. , of men discharged under General Orders, 
No. 77, current series, and similar orders. 

SAMUEL BRECK, 
Assistcmt Adjutant-Q^neraL, 

(Copy to chief mustering oficers.) 



Grnerai, Ordebs, ) War Dept., Adjt. General's Office, 

No. 101. J Washington, May SO, 1866. 

retention of arms bt soldiers on being honorably dis- 
charged FROM service. 

Upon an honorable muster out and discharge from the service of 
the United States, all volunteer soldiers desiring to do so are hereby 
authorized to retain their arms and accouterments on i)aying there- 
for their value to the Ordnance Department. 

The payments will be made, under the regulations of the Ordnance 
Department, to the officer or representative thereof at the rendezvous 
in the State to which the troops are ordered for payment and final 
discharge. 

By order of the Secretary of War: 

E. D. TOWNSEND, 
Assistant AdjiUant- General, 



War Department, Adjutant-General's Office, 

May SO', 1866, 
Governor of Maine: 

An order has been issued directing all volunteer artillery in the 
Armies of the Potomac, Tennessee, and (reorgia to be immediately 
mustered out and discharged the service of the United States. 

THOMAS M. VINCENT, 

Assistant AdjuianirGeTteral, 

(Copy for the Governors of New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachu- 
setts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pennsyl- 
vania, Delaware, Maryland, West Viijginia, Ohio, Indiana, Kentucky, 
Illinois, Missouri, Iowa, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Michigan, and Kansas.) 



General Orders, ) War Dept., Adjt. General's Offic^, 

No. 102. J Washington, May SI, 1866. 

Dei>artment, district, post, and other commanding of&cers will make 

such temporaiy details of officers and soldiers as may be required by 

assistant commissioners of the Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and 

Abandoned Lands, and render them, or other officers of said Bureau, 



44 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. 

any aid that may be required by them in the discharge of their offi- 
cial duties. 
By order of the Secretary of War: 

E. D. TOWNSEND, 

Assistcin t Adjutant- General. 



War Department, Adjutant-General's Office, 

May SI, 1865. 
Maj. Gen. John A. Dix, 

Commanding Department of the East: 
The Secretary of War directs that all volunteer organizations of 
white troops of your command (except the Veteran Reserve Corps) 
whose terms of service expire prior to October 1 next be immediately 
mustered out of service. 

The organizations to be discharged will be ordered to report to the 
rendezvous in their respective States at or nearest which mustered in, 
there to be mustered out under the direction of the chief mustering 
oflScer of the State. 

Should your command be reduced prejudicially to the service by 
this order, you are authorized to suspend it in whole or in part, 
promptly notifying and stating reasons to the Adjutant-General of 
the Army, with a view to receiving further instructions. Please 
acknowledge this. 

THOMAS M. VINCENT, 

Assistant Adjutant- Oeneral. 

(Same to Maj. Gren. Joseph Hooker, commanding Northern Depart- 
ment, Cincinnati, Ohio.) 

Chattanooga, June 1, 1865. 
A. Anderson, 

Chief Superintendent' and Engineer 

Military Railroads of the United States: 
Sir: I have the honor to submit the following report of operations 
of the Construction Corps, U. S. Military Railroads, Division of the 
Mississippi, from the date I was placed in charge, February 10, to 
June 1, 1865. Upon the completion of the work assigned me by Col. 
W. W. Wright, chief engineer, previous to his departure for Savan- 
nah, the rebuilding of the bridges on the Nashville, Decatur and 
Stevenson line, destroyed by Hood in his retreat from Nashville, 
amounting in the aggregate to 6,000 feet (linear), I reported to you at 
Nashville. On the 17th of February I'eceived orders from General 
McCaUum to send forward a division of the Construction Corps to 
Baltimore. I selected the Third Division, composed of Speers' and 
Bones' subdivisions of carpenters and workmen, comprising about 400 
men, who, in chargeof William McDonald, assistant engineer, left Nash- 
ville on February 25, with orders to proceed to Baltimore, and upon 
arrival there reporting to General McCallum at Washington, D. C. 
This division I recalled from the East Tennessee and Virginia Railroad, 
where they had been sent a few days before, General Thomas decid- 
ing not to prosecute the work any further at that time. Upon the 
withdrawal of this division I organized the Seventh Division of track- 
men, detaching a part of the Fourth Division of carpenters as a bridge 
force. The Second Division having been transferred to North Caro- 
lina some time previous, and the Fifth and Sixth Divisions employed 



UNION AUTHORITIES. 45 

upon the Nashyille and Northwestern and Nashville and Clarksville 
lines, left us on the 1st of March with the First, Fourth, and Seventh 
Divisions, amounting in all to about 2,000 men. 

On the Ist of March, by your order, I transferred the Fifth and Sixth 
Divisions of the Construction Corps, engaged in the construction and 
maintenance of the Northwestern and Clarksville lines, to the trans- 
portation department, they taking entire control of the roads from 
that date. 

February 16 sent the First Division of trackmen, who had been 
assisting the bridge force on the Nashville, Decatur and Stevenson 
line, to Chattanooga, and returned the bridge-builders of the First 
Division, by order of General Thomas, to Columbia, to erect a perma- 
nent turnpike bridge across Duck River at that, point. I directed 
Mr. Rozelle, superintendent in charge, to put up a Howe truss of three 
spans, 112 feet each, using the bolts and castings of bridges destroyed 
on the railroad. The bridge was finished the latter part of May, hav- 
ing been built at intervals when the division was not otherwise 
employed. It is a strong and permanent structure of 350 feet in 
length, costing about $50 per foot (linear), which I would respectfully 
suggest charging the turnpike company or corporation of Columbia 
with. 

On the 25th of February we were visited by a freshet, almost un- 
precedented, which destroyed or injured to a greater or less extent 
all the bridges on the Nashville, Decatur and Stevenson line, on the 
Northwestern, five on the Chattanooga and Atlanta line between 
Chattanooga and Dalton, and two on the Clarksville line. The repairs 
of the roads were commenced at once by the First Division, the per- 
manent bridge force of the various lines, and a large force of Nagle's 
men furnished by the transx)ortation depaitment. The bridges on 
the Chattanooga and Atlanta line were at the same time commenced 
by the Fourth Division, in charge of C. Latimer, division engineer, 
who upon their completion repaired with his force to the Elk River 
bridge on Nashville, Dacatur and Stevenson line, and continued 
wor^ng from that end of the line until joined by Rozelle, working 
south. 

On the 3d of March we had another freshet, almost as disastrous 
as the former one, destroying again nearly all the bridges we had 
rebuilt, and this time washing out three bridges on the Nashville 
and Chattanooga line and throwing four others out of line. Large 
forces of men were immediately put to work, and after an interrup- 
tion of one week communication was again established with Chatta- 
nooga on the Northwestern and Nashville, Decatur and Stevenson 
lines. Communication was not fully restored until the 28th. Owing 
to the destruction in part of the Red River bridge the Clarksville line 
w^t of Springfield was abandoned. 

On March 12 received orders from General Thomas to reopen the 
East Tennessee and Virginia Railroad from Strawberry Plains to 
Bull's Gap, and put it in condition to sustain as heav}'^ a business as 
was done upon the Chattanooga and Atlanta line last summer. I 
accordingly directed Mr. Latimer, division engineer, with the track 
force of the First Division and a carpenter force from the Fourth 
Division, to proceed at once to Strawberry Plains for that purpose. 
We commenced work at that point on the 14th. From thence to New 
Market the road was destroyed in patches for one mile and a half, 
including five cattle guards, two bridges of thirty feet span each, and 
tank at Friend's Station. The road was repaired and opened to New 
Market the 18th. From New Market to Morristown the track was 



46 



COBRESPONDEKCE, ETC. 



bomt in iMitclies to the extent of one mile and a qnarter. Twenty 
cattle gnards. bridge at Mossy Creek (150 feet in length), and one at 
Monristown (24 feet 8X>an) were destroyed. At this point erected 
two tanks and extended side track for 1,500 feet. From Morristown 
to Rogersville Junction, or Bull's Gap, the track was destroyed to the 
extent of three-fourths of a mile. Three bridges of 24 feet span, one 
of 40 feet span, and one at Russell ville of 150 feet span were also 
destroyed. The line was opened to Bull's Gap on the 25th. Upon 
reaching that point I received further orders from General Thomas 
to open the road to Carter's Station, on the Watauga River, twenty 
miles west of Bristol, which we reached on the 29th of April. From 
Bull's Gap to GreeneviUe the mechanical work on the road was very 
heavy, and all destroyed. Rebuilt a bridge of 100 feet span and re- 
newed 300 feet of trestle-work at Bull's Gap. From thence to Lick 
Creek the track was uninjured. The bridge and trestle-work at Lick 
Creek, 900 feet in length, was burnt and the track totally destroyed 
for seven miles, extending to a point two miles east of Blue Spring. 
The extensive trestle-work at Swan Pond, two miles east of Lick 
Creek, 1,400 feet in length and from 9 to 17 in height, was likewise 
destroyed. 

I would here take occasion to express my acknowledgment of the 
valuable service rendered by Major-General Stanley, commanding 
Fourth Army Corps, who furnished all the transportation required 
and large details of men for cutting ties and wood, loading timber, &c. 

The laying of the track between Lick Creek and Blue Spring was 
much retarded by the incessant rains occurring at that time. East 
of Blue Spring we erected two water-tanks. Between this point and 
GreeneviUe we rebuilt three bridges across the Chucky of 140 feet, 100 
feet, and 180 feet, respectively; the track was only destroyed to the 
extent of one-fourth of a mile. Between GreeneviUe and Carter's Sta- 
tion, which we reached on the 29th of April, there were three bridges 
destroyed of 245 feet, 137 feet, and 235 feet in length, respectively. 
Having reached the point to which we were ordered to open the road, 
the men were set to work cutting timber and ties, surfacing track, 
Ac. , whilst awaiting further orders. During the progress of the work 
upon the main line another force of trackmen were employed at 
Knoxville in laying a side track 3,000 feet in length to the commis- 
sary building in course of erection on the old Charleston railroad. 
Another large force were engaged lengthening the sidings on the 
main line to facilitate the passing of trains. The operations of the 
Fourth Division, of carpenters, and part of the Seventh Division, of 
trackmen, under charge of John F. Burgin, division engineer, were 
confined chiefly to the erection of buildings, though frequently 
employed upon bridges and repairs of track. The rolling-mill was 
completed and went into successful operation the latter part of March ; 
a report of operations up to the 1st of June I herewith append. 

Report of iron manufactured at rdUing-miU V. S, military railroads, at Chat- 
tanooga, Tenn., to June /, 186.5. 



ArtiolM. 



Old Iron pounds.. 

Mew ndlroad Iron pounds. . 

Coal bnsbels.. 



RaeeiTed. 



2.608.968 



59.092 



Expended. 



2.603.986 



42,262 



Manufac- 
tared. 



2,364,320 



iMoed. 



BaUnoe. 



916^036 



l.M8,»4 
16,830 



UNION AUTHORITIES. 47 

There has been a track graded west of the rolling-mill, and an 
extensive trestle and coal-bin erected. Fourteen small mess-honses 
have been bnilt, and three large buildings, in course of erection at 
date of last report, finished. A large force of the Seventh Division 
have been constantly employed at the mill up to this date digging a 
well, unloading cars, Ac. Another force of upward of 100 men of the 
Seventh Division have been employed upon repairs of the Nashville 
and Chattanooga Railroad up to this date. About eighty men have 
been constantly employed in the quarry near Chattanooga, getting out 
stone for foundations, sewers, and ballast. The most of the founda- 
tions for the roundhouse are in, and the greater part of the lumber 
intended for it cut and delivered. A double track was graded from 
the main track outside the depot yard, running to the roundhouse, 
and from thence extended ahnost to the Crutchfleld House, with the 
design ultimately of connecting with the tracks in the street. There 
has been erected also extensive barracks and officers' quarters for the 
depot guard, and a large building for officers of the transportation 
department, and extensive mess-houses for their men. At Knoxville 
there has been erected one large office building, two large mess-houses, 
and a blacksmith shop of fifty by eighty feet. Also depot buildings 
at Charleston, Athens, and Sweet Water. We have had five saw- 
mills in operation, which have cut the last three months 1,200,000 
feet of lumber, board measure, and 500,000 shingles, a large amount 
of which we have on hand. 

On the Gth of May I received your order directing the reduction of 
the Construction Corps to the lowest practicable limit. I at once 
suspended operations on the roundhouse and in the stone quarry, 
and ordered a suspension of the saw-mills, after cutting up the stock 
on hand. From the Fourth and Seventh Divisions and saw-mill 
dex>artment I have discharged 1,000 men since the receipt of your 
order, making the available force of the Construction Corps at the 
present time 1,200 men. A further reduction of the force was ar- 
rested by an order from General Thomas directing the relaying of 
the track between Dalton and Resaca and rebuilding of the bridge 
across the Oostenaula. Commencing the track at Dalton on the 10th 
of May, I sent forward part of the bridge force of the First Division 
to R»aaca to rebuild the bridge, five spans of which had been de- 
stroyed. This they accomplished and laid one mile of track south of 
it by the time we reached there, the 24th of May. From thence to 
Kingston we rebuilt three bridges, two tanks, and repaired sidings 
at Calhoun and Adairsville> the rest of the track was in compara- 
tively good order. Reached Kingston on the 26th, and the following 
day turned the road over to the transportation department. Betweea 
Kingston and Etowah three more bridges and two tanks were de- 
stro3'ed. The track was unimpaired. Reached the Etowah on the 
29th, when I received further orders from General Thomas to open 
the line to Atlanta, at which all the force of the corps at the pres- 
ent time are employed. I omitted to state we had built an engine- 
house and a large reservoir adjoining the machine-shop at Chatta- 
nooga of a capacity of 80,000 gallons. The shops in the yard, as well 
as the locomotives, are now amply supplied with water from the works 
built by the U. S. Engineer Department. We have, in connection 
with their tubs on Cameron Hill, erected a tank of a capacity of 50,000 
gallons, and have laid about 5,000 feet of main pipe and 4,000 of branch 
to the commissary building, store and mess houses. 



48 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. 

In conclusion, I take pleasure in testifying to the efficient and 
valuable services of John F. Burgin and C. Latimer, division engi- 
neers, who have on all occasions manifested an untiring zeal in the 
prosecution of work committed to their charge. 

Summary of work done on the East Tennessee and Virginia Rail- 
road from March 15 to April 29, 1865: Ninety-four miles of track 
opened and repaired; 12 miles of track rebuilt; 4,400 linear feet 
of bridging; 20,000 cross-ties cut and delivered; 57,000 cubic feet of 
timber cut for bridging; 19 switches put in; 18 frogs put in; 5 water- 
tanks erected. 

Summary of work done on the Chattanooga and Atlanta line from 
May 10 to May 31, 1865: Eighteen miles of track relaid; 1,000 linear 
feet of bridging; 6 frogs and switches put in; 4 tanks erected. 

Ten miles of the above track were laid with burnt iron, which we 
straightened; five miles with the U-rail taken from the Nashville and 
Chattanooga line, and three miles with new iron. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

L. H. EICHOLTZ, 
Acting Chief Engineer^ OovemmerU RaUroadSy 

Military Division of the Mississippi. 



War Dept., Provost-Marshal-General's Bureau, 

Washington^ D, C, June 1, 1865. 
Major-General Saxton, 

SupL Recruiting for Colored Troops, Beaufort, S. C: 
The Secretary of War directs that all enlistment of colored troops 
be immediately discontinued throughout the United States. 
Acknowledge receipt of this order. 

JAMES B. FRY, 
Provost-Marshal- OeneraL 

(Same to Major-Greneral Palmer, Louisville, Ey. ; Major-General 
Gillmore, Hilton Head, S. C; Major-General Wilson, Macon, Ga.; 
Col. W. H. Sidell, Louisville, Ey. ; Capt. Leslie Smith, Hilton Head, 

S. C.) 



War Department, 
Washington, D. C, June 2, 1865, 

RESTRICTIONS ON TRADE. 

Ordered, That any and all military restrictions upon trade in any 
of the States or Territories of the United States, except in articles 
contraband of war, shall cease from and after the present date. 
By order of the President: 

EDWIN M. STANTON, 

Secretary of War, 



General Orders, ) War Dept., Adjt. General's Office, 

No. 105. \ Washington, June 2, 1865. 

reduction of volunteer artillery. 

Department commanders will at once reduce their batteries of vol- 
unteer light artillery to the number absolutely required under existing 



UNION AUTHOKITIES. 49 

circnmstanceB by the necessities of the service in their respective 
departments. 

The companies thus relieved will .be sent to Washington, Louis- 
ville, or Cairo, as may be most convenient, for final payment and 
muster out. 

All artillery horses that may become surplus under the operation 
of this order will be sold in the department where they now are, and 
the guns of the companies that are to be discharged will be retained 
for the present within the department. 

The number of public animals retained in service, both for artillery 
and transportation purposes, will be reduced, as far as possible, 
throughout the country, and all surplus animals will be sold. 

By command of Lieutenanb-General Grant: 

E. D. TOWNSEND, 
Assistajit Adjutant' OenercU. 



General Orders, ) War Defi., Adjt. General's Office, 

No. 106. J Washington, June 2, 1865, 

Department commanders will immediately, on the receipt of this 
order, relieve all general and staff officers whose services can be dis- 
pensed with within their res(iective commands, and order them to 
proceed without delay to their respective places of residence, and 
from there report by letter to the Adjutant-General of the Army. 

Department commanders will report the names of all officers 
relieved by them under this order to the Adjutant-General of the 
Army. 
By command of Lieutenant-General Grant : 

E. D. TOWNSEND, 
Assistant AdjiUant- General, 



General Orders, ) War Dept., Adjt. General's Office, 

No. 107. S Washington, June 2, 1866, 

removal of restrictions on trade. 

Ordered, That all military restrictions upon trade in any of the 
States or Territories of the United States, except in articles contra- 
band of war — ^to wit, arms, ammunition, gray cloth, and all articles 
from which ammunition is manufactured; locomotives, cars, railroad 
iron, and machinery for operating railroads; telegraph wii-es, insula- 
tors, and instruments for operating telegraphic lines-^hall cease from 
and after the present dat^. 

By order of the President of the United States : 

E. I). TOWNSEND, 
Assista n t Adjutant- General. 

Harrisburg June 2, 1865. 
Hon. E. M. Stanton, 

Secretary of War: 
I was under the impression when I left Washington that the troops 
would be paid up to the date of their discharge. The paymasters here 

4 B B— SERIES m, vol V 



50 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. 

pay from the date of muster out. The One hundred and forty-first 
Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers arrived here on the 30th ultimo 
and has not been paid. They were must-ered out on the 28th and 
left Washington on the 2^h. I learn it is proposed to pay them until 
and including the 27th. If it can at all be done, I wish much it oonld 
be. It would add so much to the satisfaction of the officers and men 
going out of service. I only arrived in the night, and have not 
learned the reason of the delay in the payment. There are now seven 
regiments here, and I fear that it will be some time before they will 
be paid off. 

A. G. CURTIN. 



War Department, 
Washington City, June 2, 1866. 
His Exc3llency Governor A. G. Curtin, 

Harrisburgy Pa,: 
The Paymaster-General reports that he has this day instructed his 
chiefs of districts that troops mustered out under General Orders, 
No. 94, are to be paid to the date they arrive at the designated State 
rendezvous, and that all mustered-out troops at all points are being 
paid as rapidly as possible. 

EDWIN M. STANTON, 

Secretary of War, 

Circular) War Dept., Adjutant-General's Office, 

No. 21. ) Wa^hingtony June 3, 1866, 

Before the accounts with commanding officers of organizations are 
settled, mustering officers should satisfy themselves that the rolls and 
returns, as required by Army Regulations for their organization, have 
been forwarded to this office. 

E. D. TOWNSEND, 
Assistant Adjutant- General, 



War Department, 
Washington y D. C, June 5, 1866, 

DISCHARGE OF VOLUNTEERS. 

The Adjutant-Grieneral will issue an order for the immediate dis- 
charge of — 

First. All dismounted cavalry in every military department. 

Second. All cavalry force in Greneral Dix's department. 

Third. All volunteer infantry in General Dix's department (except 
Veteran Reserves) whose services can in the judgment of the com- 
mander of the department be dispensed with. 

Fourth. All volunteer infantry in General Hooker's department 
(except Veteran Reserves) whose services are in the opinion of the 
commander of the department no longer requir'^J. 

EDWIN M. STANTON, 

Secretary of War, 



Circular) War Dept., Adjutant-General's Office, 

No. 23. J Washington, June 6, 1865, 

Volunteer soldiers entitled to discharge, and wishing to enlist in 
the Regular Army, under the t/Crms of General Oixlers, No. 99, cur- 



UNION AUTHORITIES. 51 

rent series, will be foi-thwith mustered out at their several coimnands, 
receive their discharges, and will not be sent to rendezvous under the 
provisions of General Orders, No. 94, current series, but on enlist- 
ment in the Regular Army will receive final payments under the 
requirements of paragraph 3, General Orders, No. 83, current series. 
The attention of commanding officers of regiments, batteries, and 
detached commands of the Regular Army 13 called to the immediate 
necessity of api)ointing recruiting officers for their several com- 
mands, in order to obtain the advantages of General Orders, No. 99, 
current series. In designating these officers, commanding officers 
will be governed by the requirements of paragraphs 986, 987, and 
988, Revised Regulations for the Army, governing regimental recruit- 
ing service. 

E. D. TOWNSEND, 
Assistant Adjutatit-Genercd, 



General Orders, ) War Dbpt., Adjt. General's Office, 

No. 110. f Washingtoriy June 7, 1S65, 

The following order of the President of the United States (in rela- 
tion to the transfer of abandoned lands, funds, and property set apart 
for the use of freedmen) to the Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and 
Abandoned Lands is published for the information and guidance of 
all concerned: 

Executive Mansion, 
Washington, D. C, June J?, 1865. 

Whereas, by an act of Congress approved March third, eighteen hundred and 
sizty-five, there was established in tne War Department a Bureau of Refuseee, 
Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands, and to which, in accordance with the saia act 
of Congress, is committed the supervision and management of all abandoned 
lands, and the control of all subjects relating to refugees and freedmen from 
rebel States, or from any district of country within the territory embraced in the 
operations of the Army, under such rules and regulations as may be prescribed 
\^ the head of the Bureau and approved by the President; and whereas, it appears 
tnat the management of abandoned lands and subjects relating to refugees and 
freedmen, as aforesaid, have been, and still are, by orders based on military 
ezigenciee, or legislation based on previous statutes, partly in the hands of mih- 
tary officers disconnected vrith said Bureau, and partly in charge of officers of tiie 
Treasury Department: It is therefore 

Ordered, That aU officers of the Treasury Department, all military officers, and 
all others in the service of the United States, torn over to the authorized officers 
of said Bureau all abandoned lands and property contemplated in said act of Con- 
gress, approved March third, eighteen hundred and sixty-five, establishing the 
Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands, that may now be under 
or within their control. They will also turn over to such officers all funds col- 
lected by tax or otherwise, for the benefit of refugees or freedmen, or accruing 
from abandoned lands, or property set apart for their use, and will transfer to 
them all official records connected with the administration of affairs which per- 
tain to said Bureau. 



By order of the Secretary of War : 



ANDREW JOHNSON. 

E. I). TOWNSEND, 

Assistant Adjutant- General, 



Chicago, June cV, 1865. 



Hon. E. M. Stanton, 

Secretary of War: 
Pursuant to your orders I have given directions for tlie immediate 
discbarge of all volunteer troops in the Northern Department except 



52 COBBESPONDENCS, ETC. 

the Eighty-eighth and One hundred and twenty-eighth Ohio Volun- 
teers and the Veteran Reserve Corps. The Eighty-eighth is stationed 
at Camp Chase and the One hundred and twenty-eighth at Johnson's 
Island. The interest of the service requires that these regiments 
shall be retained a few weeks longer. 

JOSEPH HOOKER, 
Major- Oeneraly Commanding. 



Genebal. Obders, I Wab Dept., Adjt. Genebal's Office, 

No. 111. ) Washington, Jwae 10, 1866. 

The annexed opinions of the Attorney-General relative to the 
amounts of bounty payable to certain soldiers and the proi)er con- 
struction of section 4 of the Army appropriation act of Mai*eh 3, 
1865 (General Orders, No. 45, Adjutant-General's Office, March 21, 
1865), concerning the allowance of "three months' pay proper" to 
certain volunteer officers continuing in the service "to the close of 
the war," are published for the information and guidance of all con- 
cerned: 

Attorney-General's Office, 

May (?, 186S. 
Hon. Edwin M. Stanton, 

Secretary of War: 

Sm: I have considered the several questions presented by the Paymaster- 
General and the Adjutant-General of the Armv in their respective conunnnica- 
tions of Hay 8 and May 4, instant, relative to the amounts oi bounty payable to 
the soldiers of certain military organizations now being mustered out of service, 
and also the point suggested in those communications relative to the proper 
construction of the fourth section of the Army appropriation act of March 
8, 1865 (18 Stat., 497) , concerning the allowance of extra pay (as it may be called) 
to certain volunteer officers continuing in the service *' to the close of the war." 

The first question is, whether veterans who re-enlisted and persons who enlisted 
in the regular or volunteer forces of the United States for tnree years or during 
tiie war, under the regrolations and orders referred to in the commTmication <» 
the Paymaster-G^eneral, issued by the Secretary of War, and by the Provost- 
Marshal-General with the approviu of the Secretary, and who may be honorably 
mustered out the service by reason of the Government no longer requiring tiieir 
services, before the expiration of their term of enlistment, are respectively 
entitled, on being so mustered out, to the unpaid balances of the bounties prom- 
ised to them bjr the orders under which they were enlisted. 

I am of opinion that they are so entitled, by the operation of the joint resolu- 
tions of Congress, approved respectively January 18, 1864, and March 8, 1864, 
which give the force and effect of law to the regrolations and orders of the War 
Department iust referred to, providing for the payment of bounties to the classes 
of soldiers above named. These regulations and orders, in terms, promise and 
declare that *' if the Gkivemment shall not require these troops for the full period 
of three years, and they shall be mustered honorably out of the service before 
the expiration of their term of enlistment, they shall receive, upon being mustered 
out, the whole amount of bounty remaining unpaid, the same as if the fuU term 
had been served. '* 

The second question relates to soldiers who entered the service pursuant to and 
under the provisions of the act of July 4, 1864, promulgated by your Department 
in General Orders, No. 204; and it is whether thev are resi>ectively entitled to 
receive, on being thus mustered out of the service before the expiration of their 
respective terms of enlistment, the whole amounts of bounty to which they 
would have been entitled if they had continued in the service throughout their 
respective periods of enlistment, or onlv those proportions or installments of the 
several bounties which may have actually accruea to them at the dates of their 
respective discharges. 

I am of opinion that a volunteer accepted and mustered into the service under 
the statute of July 4, 1864, whether for a term of one year, or of two years, or of 
three years, if he is mustered out of the service, for the reason mentioned, before 
the e3n;)iration of the term of service for which he enlisted, is entitled to receive 
only the proportion of the bounty alloweil him by the statute, whether one-third 



UKION AUTH0BITIE8. 68 

or two-thirds thereof, which had aotaally aocraed before the date of his discharge. 
If, for iiiBtance, he Tolnnteered for two years, and is mustered oat before the 
ezpiration of the first year of his service, he cannot claim either the second or 
the third installment of the bounty of ^iOO which would have been payable to 
him had he continued in the service till the expiration of the two years for which 
he enlisted. The volunteer only who, at the time of his discharse, has completed 
one half of the term of service for which he enlisted, is entitled to the second 
installment of one-third of the amount of bounty given to him by the act; and 
be is entitled to no more of that bounty. If he is discharged on the next day 
after the ezpiration of one-half of his term of enlistment, the second installment 
of the bounty is due and payable to him. The Oovemment cannot reclaim it if 
it has been paid, nor withhold it if it remain unoaid. But the discharge pre- 
cludes him from receiving the third installment; tnat only is due to a volunteer 
who may have served through the whole term for which he enlisted. I confess 
that there is some obscurity in the act, and that there is a little difficulty in deter- 
mining its meaning. But, on the whole, I am of opinion that the raymaster- 
Gleneral lias arrived at the true construction of the statute. 

The third question is, whether commissioned officers of volunteers below the 
rank of brigadier-general, whom the Government may now muster out of service 
because their services are no longer required, are entitled respectively to receive, 
on their leaving the service, '* three months* pay proper," unaer the provisions of 
the fourth section of the act of March, 1865. 

The right of these officers to receive that allowance dejiends upon the deter- 
mination of the point whether they have continued in the service *' to the close 
of the war'* within the meaning of the statute of 1865. I am of opinion if such 
an officer continue in the Army till he is honorably mustered out, because his 
military services are no longer needed, and till the Gk>vemment thus declares that 
it no longer re<}uires him to perform any duty on its behalf under his commission, 
that he is withm the provision of the statute, and in its contemplation he has 
continued in the military service '*to the close of the war." Tne war, so far 
as he is concerned in his capacity as an officer, has closed. He has performed 
his duty — his entire duty— to the Government and the cause for which he drew 
his sword. When his country, by its appropriate organ, commands him to return 
his sword to the scabbard, and retires him honorablv from its service, I know not 
how we can, with respect to that officer, say that the war has not closed. I am 
of opinion that an officer of the class named in the statute now, and thus mus- 
terea out of service, is entitled to receive ** three months' pay proper." 
I am, sir, most respectfully, your obedient servant, 

JAMES SPEED, 
Attomey-Oeneral, 

By onler of the Secretary of War: 

E. D. TOWNSEND, 
Assistant Adjutant- Qeneral, 



War Department, Adjutant-General's Office, 

June 10, 1866. 
Commanding Generals of Departments and Armies: 

Under General Orders, No. 101, May 30, current year, from this 
office, soldiers honorably mastered ont, who desire to do so, are 
authorized to retain their arms and accouterments on paying therefor 
their value. To this end soldiers who desire to take advantage of 
the said order must signify their intention before leaving the field, 
so that the prices may 1& entered on their must.er-out rolls. 

The pric<\s fixed by the Ordnance Department are as follows: 
Muskets, all kinds, with or without accouterments, $6 ; Spencer car- 
bines, $10; all other carbines, $8; sabers and swords, with or without 
belts, $3.* 

Please promulgate this order for the guidance of commissaries of 
masters and all others concerned. 

E. D. TOWNSEND, 
Assistant Adjutant- General. 

•Also announced in Circular No. 24, Adjutant-General's Office, June 10, 1865. 



54 COBBESPONDKNCE, ETC. 

War Department, Ai>jutant-General'8 Office, 

June 13, 1865. 
Governor of Maine: 

Under instructioDS of the Secretary of War, chief mastering officers 
have been ordered to turn over to Yonr Excellency the colors in their 
charge, under paragraph V of General Orders, No. 94, current series, 
at such time as you may designate. 
Please to communicate your wishes to the said officers. 

THOMAS M. VINCENT, 

Assistant Acy^Uant'C^ener€d. 

(Same to Governors of New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, 
Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, 
Delaware, Maryland, West Virginia, Ohio, Indiana, Kentucky, Illi- 
nois, Missouri, Iowa, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Michigan, Kansas.) 



General Orders, ) War Deft., Ai>jt. General's Office, 

No. 113. ) Washington, June 16, 1866. 

ORDER IN RELATION TO SALE OF UNSERVICEABLE QUARTERMASTER'S 

PROPERTY. 

I. Chief quartermasters of military departments, the chief of the 
inspection division, and the regularly assigned inspectors of thr 
Quartermaster's Department will immediately cause to be made and 
forwarded to the Quartermaster-General invoices of such articles ol 
clothing, camp and garrison equipage, and quartermaster's stores as, 
on personal inspection, they may find unserviceable or worthless to 
the Government; and also of such articles as it would be more eco- 
nomical to the Government to sell than to ship to other points. The 
latter invoices will be separate from the former. The sale of the 
property embraced in these invoices having been approved by the 
Quartermaster-General, they will be submitted to the Secretary of 
War for his orders. All proceedings subsequent to any order of sale 
that may be given will be conducted according to the Regulations, by 
due advertisement, ^c. 

II. No sale of public buildings, barracks, quarters, stables, Ac, 
will be made except on an oiSer of the Quartermaster-General, 
approved by the Secretary of War, indorsed upon a report to be made 
in each case in the usual form. 

By order. of the Secretary of War: 

E. D. TOWNSEND, 
Assistant AdjuiantrOeneral. 



General Orders, ) War Dept., Adjt. General's Office, 

No. 114. ) Washington, June 16, 1866. 

Soldiers honorably discharged will be permitted to retain, without 
charge, their knapsacks, haversacks, and canteens. 
By order of the Secretary of War: 

E. D. TOWNSEND, 
Assistant AdjutanUOenerdL 



UNION AUTHORITIES. 55 

GsNERAL Obbers, ) Wab Dept., Adjt. Gbnbral's Office, 

No. 115. ) WashingioTij June IS, 1866. 

The payment of all U. S. bounties to men enlisting in the military 
service will cease from and after July 1, 1865. 
By order of the Secretary of War: 

E. D. TOWNSEND, 
Assistant Adjutant- General. 



OiBcnLAR) War Dept., Adjutant-General's Office, 

No. 25. J Washington, June 16, 1866, 

Officers or enlisted men who may hereafter be commissioned (under 
first appointments) by the Governors of States to regiments or com- 
panies of volunteers serving in Texas will be furnished with free 
transportation on Government transports to the respective stations of 
their regiments or companies. Existing regulations are amended 
accordingly. 

The presentation of a Governor's commission will be sufficient to 
secure a transx>ortation order from the proper officer of the Quarter- 
master's Department. 
By order of the Secretary of War: 

E. D. TOWNSEND, 
Assistant AdjutanUOeneral, 

Hdqbs. State of Arkansas, Adjt. Gen.'s Office, 

JjUtOe Rock, June 16, 1866. 
Hon. Edvv^in M. Stanton, 

Secretary of War, Washington, D. C: 
Sir: I am requested by His Excellency the Governor of the State to 
ask that the citizens of Arkansas now serving in the regiments of 
other States be mustered out of the service. There is a large class of 
this class of soldiers on duty in the Department of Arkansas and 
elsewhere in regiments from Missouri and Kansas, and somewhat 
from Iowa and Illinois. Many of their families are in the State in the 
most destitute condition, while others are refugees and equally requir- 
ing their assistance. It is also a matter of very great importance in 
the maintenance of law and order, and the restoration of peace and 
quiet throughout the State, that they should be permitted to return 
to their homes at the earliest possible moment to secure that pre- 
ponderance of tried loyal sentiment so necessary in the present 
emergency. 
I have the honor to remain, very respectfully, your obedient sei-vant, 

A. W. BISHOP, 
Adjyiafit- Qeneral. 

General Orders, ) War Dept., Adjt. General's Office, 

No. 116. J Washington, June 17, 1866, 

Enlisted men of the Veteran Reserve Corps who, if they had 
remained in the volunteer regiments from which they were trans- 
ferred to the Veteran Reserves, would, under existing orders, now be 
entitled to master out of service, will be so discharged, provided 
that no man shall be mustered out who desires to serve his full term. 
By order of the Secretary of War: 

E. D. TOWNSEND, 
A.ssistant AdjviaiiirOeneral, 



56 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. 

Circular ) War Dept., Adjutant-General's Office, 

Xo. 20. f Wnshingfon, June 17, 1865. 

ORDERS AND INSTRUCTIONS RELATIVE TO THE MUSTER OUT AND 
DISCHARGE OF CERTAIN VOLUNTBBB TROOPS. 

White troops (except Veteran Reserve Corps) whose terms expire prior 
to October 1, 1S(;5; ailillery in the Annies of the Potomac (includ- 
ing Ninth Corps), Tennessee, and Georgia; dismounted cavalry 
in all armies and departments; all cavalry in the Department of 
the East, and certain infantry in the Northern Department and 
Department of the East. 

Telcoram.] War Departmrnt, Adjutant-General's Oppice, 

WaahingUm, May 17, 186S. 
Maj. Gen. Georob G. Heads, 

Commanding Army of the Potomac: 

The Secretary of War directs that all volunteer organizations of white troops 
in your command whose terms of service expire between this date and September 
80 next, inclusive, be immediately mnsterea ont of service. 

The masters out will be made with existing regimental and company organisa- 
tions, and under the reg^ilations promulgated in General Orders, No. 04, of the 
15th instant, from this office. 

All men in the aforesaid organizations whose terms of service expire subsequent 
to October 1, 1865, will be transferred to other organizations from the same State; 
to veteran regiments when practicable, and when not practicable to regiments 
having the longest time to serve. 

It is proper to add that this order will discharge as follows: 

First. Tne three-years' regiments that were mustered into service under the call 
of July 2, 1862, and prior to October 1 of that year. 

Second. Three-years* recruits mustered into service for old regiments between 
the same dates. 

Third. One-year's men for new and old organizations, who entered the service 
between May 17 and October 1, 1864. 

Please acknowledge receipt of this. 

THOMAS M. VINCENT, 

Asittistan t Adju tant-General. 

Note. — Orders and instructions, as in the foregoing, were applied to the Army 
of the Tennessee and Army of Georgia, under the commana of Major-Genenu 
Sherman, June 18, 1865. 

Telegram.] War Department, Adjutant-General's Office, 

Washington, May IS, 186$. 
Maj. Gen. George G. Meade, 

Commanding Army of the Potomac: 

In connection with the telegram order of yesterday, relative to the discharge of 
troops whose terms expire prior to October 1, and referring to paragraph IV, Gen- 
eral Orders, No. 04, current series, I am directed to say that it is of importance 
that the muster-out rolls should be ready in the shortest time possible. 

Extra clerks should be detailed to assist the commissaries of musters and their 
assistants. 

In the absence of rooms for use as offices, hospital and wall tents should be 
provided for the use of mustering officers in making out the necessary papers. 
All other proper facilities at command should also be afforded. 

The attention of corps, division, and brigade commanders should be particularly 
directed to what is required of them under paragraph IV, Gteneral Orders, No. 94. 

Assistant inspectors-general should be directed to frequently visit regiments 
and companies, to see in person if the data for the rolls and other papers are 
promptly and accurately furnished by regnmental and company officei*s, confer- 
ring with the commissaries of musters and their assistants with the view of cor- 
recting at once any delinquencies they may find to exist. 

THOMAS M. VINCENT, 

Assistant Adjutant-Oeneral. 

Note.— The foregoing instructions were applied to the Army of the Tennessee 
and Army of Georgia, May 18, 1865, and to other amiies and departments, except 
Department of the East, Northern Department, Departments of the Pacific and 
New Mexico, June 2, 1865. 



UNION AUTHORITIES. 57 

War Department. Adjutant-General's Office, 

Washington, May 2U, ISCn. 

tklxoram to commanding generals of all armies and departments, except 

armies of the POTOMAC, TENNESSEE, AND GEORGIA. AND DEPARTMENTS OF 
THE EAST, PACIFIC, NEW MEXICO, AND NORTHERN DEPARTMENT. 

The Secretary of War directs that all Toltmteer organizations of white troops 
in yoor command whose terms of service expire between this date and September 
30 next, inclosiTe, be immediately mustered ont of service. 

The mnsters out will be made with existing regimental and company organiza- 
tions, and under the regulations promulgated in General Orders, No. 94, of the 
15th instant, from this office. 

All men in the aforesaid organizations whose terms of service expire subsequent 
to October 1 will be transferred to other organizations from the same State; to 
veteran regiments when practicable, and when not practicable to regiments hav- 
InK the longest time to serve. 

It is proper to add that this order will discharge as follows: 

First. Tne three-years* regiments that were mustered into service under the call 
of July 2, 18(12, and prior to October 1 of that year. 

Second. Three-years* recruits mustered into service for old regiments between 
the same dates. 

Third. One-year's men for new and old organizations who entered the service 
prior to October 1 , 1864. 

Should your command be reduced prejudicially to the service by this order, you 
are authorized to susi)end it in whole or m port, promptly notifying the Adjutant- 
General of the Army, with a view to receiving further instructions. 

Please acknowledge receipt of this. 

THOMAS M. VINCENT, 

Assistant Adjutant-Cfeneral, 

Telegram.] War Department, Adjutant-General's Office, 

Washington, May SO, 18G6, 
Haj. Qen. George G. Meade, 

Commanding Army of tlie Potomac, 
Maj. Gen. John G. Parke, 

Commanding Ninth Army Corps: 

CIRCUUkR TO commanding GENERALfi ARMIES OF GEORGIA AND TENNESSEE, 
through HEADQUARTERS MIUTARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI. 

The Secretary of War directs that all the volunteer artillery of your commaad 
(army) be immediately mustered out and discharged. 

For this arm of the service General Orders, Iso. 94, current series, from this 
office, is so modified as to allow said troops to be sent to their respective States, 
there to be mustered out under the direction of the chief mustering officer of the 
State. 

Prior to their departure all public property will be turned over to the proper 
officers of the supply departments concerned for the command with which they 
may be serving. 

llie troops ^ould be placed en route with the least practicable delay, and for- 
warded to the respective rendezvous in their States at or nearest which they were 
mustered in. 

Please acknowledge receipt of this. 

THOMAS M. VINCENT, 

Assistant Adjutant-General. 

War Department, Adjutant-General's Office, 

Washington, June 5, 18G6. 

telegram to commanding generals of all ARMIES AND DEPARTMENTS. EXCEPT- 
ING DEPARTMENTS OF THE EAST AND THE NORTHERN. 

The Secretary of War directs that all dismounted volunteer cavalry of your 
command be immediately discharged the service. 

The musters out will be made by commissaries of musters and their assistants, 
and the troops afterward forwarded to their re8i)ective States for payment. 

The general principles of General Orders, No. 94, current series, from this office, 
will be applied in executing this order. 



58 COBBESPONDENCB, ETC. 

Please acknowledge reoeipt of this by telegram and report the nmnber of men 
to be discharged. 

THOMAS M. VINCENT, 

Aaaistant Acfjutant-Oeneral. 

MEMORANDA. 

1. See General Orders, No. 105, of June 2, for the discharge of cer- 
tain batteries of artillery. 

2. Telegram from this office of June 5, 1865, to Major-General Dix, 
commanding Department of the East, directed all volunteer cavalry 
in that department to be discharged; organizations to be sent to their 
respective States for muster out under the direction of the chief 
mustering officers thereof. 

3. Telegrram from this office of June 5, 1866, to Major-General Dix, 
commanding Department of the East, and Major-General Hooker, 
commanding Northern Department, directed all volunteer infantry 
(except Veteran Reserve Corps) in said departments whose services 
were no longer required to be discharged; organizations to be sent to 
their respective States for muster out under the direction of the chief 
mustering officers thereof. 

4. Telegram from this office of June 16, 1865, to Major-General 
McDowell, commanding Department of the Pacific, directed all vol- 
unteer troops in that department whose terms expire prior to October 
1, 1865, to be immediately discharged. Should the order reduce the 
command prejudicially to the service, authority was given to suspend 
it, in whole or in part, until the receipt of further orders through the 
Adjutant-General of the Army. 

E. D. TOWNSEND, 
Assistant Adjutant-GeneroL 



Confidential Circular.] Washington, June 22, 1865, 

All department commandei-s commanding in States where martial 
law prevails will immediately put detectives upon the watch for 
gambling-houses, especially faro banks, and at the appropriate time 
make a descent upon them all simultaneously, arresting all disburs- 
ing officers of the Government who may be found gambling in them, 
or visitants therein at the time, and who it can be proven had pi'e- 
viously gambled at such places. The gambling institutions will be 
completely broken up and their money and stock confiscated, and 
the owners or proprietors of such gambling institutions be made to 
disgorge and refund all money they have won from U. S. disbursing 
officers. The officer so taken will be imprisoned and tried immedi- 
ately. The same proceedings will be taken by department command- 
ers in the North within their respective commands in the cities where 
disbursing officers may be located, except that instead of confiscating 
the money and stock of the gambling establishments, or compelling 
by military action the owners and proprietors of the same to disgorge 
or refund any moneys they may have won from disbursing officers of 
the Government, they will be immediately reported to the civil author- 
ities 'for their action. This will be kept strictly confidential, except 
so far as it may be necessary to communicate it to those who are to 
carry it into execution. 

U. S. GRANT, 

Lieutcnant'OeneraL, 

(Sent to all military division and department commandei*s in cipher.) 



UNION A1TTH0RITIS8. 59 

MSMORAKBUM.] WaR DBPT., PaYMASTER-GENERAL'S OFFICE, 

Washington, D. C, June '22, 1866, 
All veteran volunteers in batteries of volunteer artillery mustered 
out as organizations from Armies of Potomac, Tennessee, and Georgia, 
under recent orders, are mustered out "on account of their services 
being no longer required," and are entitled to balance of veteran 
bounty. 
Heavy artillery follows the general rule, not that for field artillery. 



Special. Orders, ) Hdqrs. op the Army, Adjt. Gbn.'s Office, 
No. 328. f Washmgion, Jwne 23, 1866, 

* m m m * m * 

5. Bvt. Maj. Gen. J. D. Webster, U. S. Volunteers, is hereby tem- 
porarily detached from the staff of Maj. Gen. W. T. Sherman, and 
will proceed without delay on a tour of inspection of the railroads of 
the Southern States, reporting upon their present condition and their 
ability to transport the U. S. mails. 

In his report he will consider all the subjects mentioned in the let- 
ter of instructions which will be given him, and such other matters 
pertaining to the Southern railroa<ls as in his investigations may sug- 
gest themselves. 

General Webster is authorized to employ and take with him an 
experienced railroad man. 

Upon the execution of this order General Webster will report to 
Major-General Sherman for duty. 

By command of Lieutenant-General Grant: 

E. D. TOWNSEND, 
Assistant Adjutant- General. 



War Department, Adjutant-General's Office, 

Washington, June 2S, 1866, 
Maj. Gen. G. M. Dodge, 

Saint Louis, Mo.: 
The Secretary of War directs that all troops belonging to the Mis- 
souri State Militia, authorized by General Orders, No. 96, of 1861, and 
yet remaining in service, be immediately discharged. 

The musters out will be made under the regulations promulgated 
in General Orders, No. 94, current series, from this office. 

THOMAS M. VINCENT, 

Assistant Adjutant- General. 



War Department, Adjutant-General's Office, 

June 26, 1866. 
Chief Mustering Officers United States: 

On the 22d instant the following additional reductions of the 
effective volunteer infantry forces present were ordered, viz: Army 
of the Potomac, 18,000 men; Army of the Tennessee, 15,000 men; 
Middle Military Division, 7,0CK). The reductions will be made by the 
muster out of entire organizations of veteran regiments having the 
shortest time to serve, includin'x hU i-ecruits and additions to said 



60 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. 

regiments from other sources ; also all absentees. Thg total reduction 
will be about 70,000. General Orders, No. 94, current series, from 
this office, will govern the musters out and payments. 
Please furnish the Governor with a copy of this. 

THOMAS M. VINCENT, 

Assistant Adjutant- Oenercd. 



Circular) War Dept., Adjutant-General's Office, 

No. 27. J Washington, June 26, 1865, 

The necessity for the services of the invalid companies of the Reg- 
ular Army, authorized by paragraph 5 of General Orders, No. 245, of 
1863, having ceased, the organizations will be discontinued. Com- 
manding officers of depots will at once cause a careful medical exam- 
ination to be made of the enlisted men composing them. All men 
who are not now, or who are not likely to become in a reasonable 
time, capable of performing field duty will at once be discharged on 
the usual medical certificates. The remainder will be forwarded to 
their companies as rapidly as their condition will permit. 

E. D. TOWNSEND, 
Assistant Adjutant- General, 



War Departbcent, Adjutant-General's Office, 

WashingUm, June 26, 1S65, 

telegram to department commanders. 

Please cause an immediate investigation as to the expiration of 
service of all men on detached duty, in confinement, Ac, within your 
department, that all entitled to discharge may be forwarded to the 
chief mustering officer of their respective States for muster out, or 
to be otherwise disposed of, as required by existing orders. Appli- 
cations from the friends of this class of persons for their discharge 
are being constantly received at this Department. 

SAMITEL BRECK, 
Assistant Adjutant- General. 



Washington, June 28, 1866, 
Hon. E. M. Stanton, 

Secretary of War: 
I understand there is a great delay in carrying out orders for the mus- 
ter out of troops in hospitals throughout the North arising principally 
from neglect of officers forwarding with sick men their descriptive 
rolls. In many instances the organizations to which sick men belong 
have been mustered out, leaving no way to get at their descriptive 
rolls further than their record is kept in the AdjutAut-General's 
Office. 

I would recommend that a circular be sent to all hospitals directing 
promptness in carrying out existins? orders so far as they apply to 
men supplied with the requisite papers to enable them to do so, and 
report to the Adjutant-(Teneral the name, regiment, <fec., of all men 
who should be mustered out but are not supplied with descriptive 
rolls. 

r. S. GRANT, 

Lif iitrmiHt'Crpneral, 



UNION AUTHOBITIES. 61 

Circular ) War Dept., Adjutant-General's Office, 

No. 28. f Washingto7ij June 28, 1865, 

ORDERS AND INSTRUCTIONS RELATIVE TO THE MUSTER OUT OF VOL- 
UNTEER TROOPS. 

Certain veteran regiments in the Armies of the Potomac, Tennessee, 
and Middle Military Division, and certain infantry, cavalry, and 
artillery in- various armies and departments. 

I. Veteran regiments. 

Telegram.] War Department, Adjutant-General's Office, 

Washington, June 22, 1866. 

OOMMAKDINO GENERAL ARMY OF THE POTOMAC : 

The Secretary of War directs that the effective infantry force present of the 
Army of the Potomac be reduced by the discharge of 18,000 men. 

The masters out will be by entire organizations of veteran regiments, to be 
selected from those having the shortest time to serve, including all recruits and 
additions thereto from other sources; also, absentees belonging to them. The 
absentees to be an additional reduction of the effective force. 

The musters out and discharges will be made under the regulations promul- 
gated in General Orders, No. 94, current series, from this office. 

Please forward to this office without delay a list of the regiments you may 
select under this order, giving therein for each the strength, present and absent, 
remectively. 

Acknowledge the receipt of this. 

THOMAS M. VINCENT, 

Assistant Adjutant-Oeneral. 

Note. — Similar orders sent June 23 to the commanding general Army of the 
Tennessee for the discharge of 15,000 men from that army, and to the command- 
ing general Mid^e Military Division for the discharge of 7,000 from that division. 

II. Regiments of cavalry, artillery, and infantry (whose services are 
no longer required) ordered mustered out of service under special 
instructions, of dates set opposite the organizations respectively. 

ConnectieiU,— First Battery, May 29, 1865. 

Illinois, — ^Eighty-second Infantry, June 12, 1865. 

Indiana. — One hundred and first Infantrj^ June 12, 1865; Ninety- 
first Infantry, June 15, 1865. 

Maine. — Three unassigned companies infantry, June 16, 1865; three 
companies Coast Guard, June 16, 1865. 

Maryland. — First Potomac Home Brigade Infantry, May 29, 1865; 
Second Potomac Home Brigade Infantry, May 29, 1865; Third Poto- 
mac Home Brigade Infantry, May 29, 1865; First Potomac Home 
Brigade Cavalry, June 23, 1865. 

Massachuseibs. — First Cavalry, June 17, 1865. 

Michigan. — Twenty-sixth Infantry, June 2, 1865. 

Missouri. — Forty-eighth Infantry, June 13, 1865; Missouri State 
Militia (about 2,200, authorized under General Orders, No. 96, 
Adjutant-General's Office, 1861), June 23, 1865. 

Neiv Jersey. — Thirty-ninth Infantry, June 5, 1865. 

New York. — One hundred and fiftieth Infantry, May 29, 1865; 
Batteries A, K, and F, First Artillery, June 5, 1865; First Engineers, 
June 5, 1865; Fifteenth Engineers, June 5, 1865; Fiftieth Engineers, 
June 5, 1866; Second Cavalry (Harris Light), June 17, 1865; Eighth 
Cavalry, June 17, 1865; Nineteenth Cavalry (First Dragoons), June 
17, 1865; Fiist Cavalry (Lincoln), June 18, 1865; Twenty-fifth Cav- 
alry, June 20, 1865; One hundred and fifty-first Infantry (battalion), 
June 22, 18G5. 



62 CORBE8PONDENCE, ETC. 

Ohio. — One hundred and tenth Infantry, June 16, 1865; One hun- 
dred and eighteenth Infantry, June 16, 1865; One hundred and 
twenty-second Infantry, June 16, 1865; One hundred and twenty- 
sixth Infantry, June 16, 1866; First Heavy Artillery, June 25, 1865. 

Pennsylvania. — One hundred and fiftieth Infantry, June 10, 1866; 
Two hundred and first Infantry, June 15, 1865; Independent Battery 
G, June 7, 1865. 

Tennessee,— Eighth Infantry, June 22, 1865. 

West Virginia. — ^First Cavalry, June 17, 1865; Second Cavalry, 
June 17, 1865; Third Cavalry, June 17, 1865; Sixth Infantry, May 
13, 1865; Comi)any A, First Vii^nia (exempts) Infantry, May 8, 1866; 
Fourteenth Infantry, June 23, 1865; Seventeenth Infantry, June 23, 
1865. 

U. 8. Volimteers. — ^First Infantry, June 2, 1866; Second Infantry, 
June 2, 1865; Third Infantry, June 2, 1865; Fourth Infantry, June 2, 
1865; Fifth Infantry, June 2, 1865; Sixth Infantry, June 2, 1865. 

Memoranda.— Jttn6 ^3y 1866.— The order of June 5 relative to 
dismounted volunteer cavalry (see Circular No. 26, current series) 
was revoked for the Middle Military Division and Major-General 
Sheridan's command, and instead it was ordered: That a limited 
number of cavalry regiments having the shortest time to serve be 
dismounted and mustered out by entire organizations (under General 
Orders, No. 94, current series, from this office), and the horses thus 
obtained taken to mount the dismounted cavalrymen of regiments 
having the longest terms to serve. The number of regiments to be 
dismounted to be determined by the number of dismounted men of 
the long-termed organizations. 

A like revocation was also ordered for other armies and depart- 
ments, provided the said order of June 5 had not been executed. 

E. D. TOWNSEND, 
Assistant AdjutanUOeneral. 



General Orders, ) War Dept., Adjt. General's Office, 

No. 119. ) Washington, June 29, 1866. 

PENALTIES FOR NEGLECT OF DUTY AND DISOBEDIENCE OF ORDERS 
ON THE PART OF COMMISSIONED OFFICERS IN CHARGE OF TROOPS 
ABOUT TO BE DISCHARGED THE SERVICE. 

In many instances delays have resulted in paying mustered-out 
troops in consequence of regimental and company officers allowing 
their men to disband, in violation of orders, prior to their commands 
being reported for payment and final discharge to the chief muster- 
ing officer or his assistant, after arrival at the designated State ren> 
dezvous. In other cases there has been delay from company and 
regimental officers neglecting to furnish full data relative to the 
enlisted men, thus rendering the muster-out rolls imperfect and neces- 
sitating corrections. 

With the arrangements of the War Department, as now completed, 
there need be no delay, and consequently no hardship or inconven- 
ience to the enlisted men, if full data for the rolls be furnished in the 
field, and if, after arrival in their respective States, as well as during 
transit thereto, commissioned officers look closely after the comfoit 
and interests of their men and remain constantly with them, so as to 
enforce orders and control them. 



UNION AUTHOIimBS. 63 

It is therefore ordered that chief mustering officers and their assist- 
ants report by telegram the names of all neglectful officers, with the 
charges against them, to the Adjutant-General of the Army (with- 
holding in the meantime their final payments and honorable dis- 
cbarges), with a view to their summary and dishonorable dismissal 
from the service with forfeiture of all pay. The report by telegraph 
will be sent promptly upon cases of neglect being brought to notice, 
and at the same time the facts in full will be reported by mail. 

Governors -of States are requested to report delinquencies coming 
to tbeir notice to the chief mustering officer of the State and to the 
Adjutant-General of the Army, so that a prompt remedy may be 
applied. 

By order of the Secretary of War: 

E. D. TOWNSEND, 
Aasisiant Adjutanl-QeneraL 



Office Engineer and Supt. Military Railroam, 
Departments of the Tennessee and Arkansas, 

MemphiSy Tenn,, June 30, 1866, 
Bvt. Brig. Gen. D. C. McCallum, 

Director and Oeneral Manager 

MUUary Railroads United States ^ WashingUm^ D. C; 

General.: I herewith submit a report of the operations of the mili- 
tary railroads under my chai^ for Uie year ending June 30, 1865: 

At the close of the last fiscal year the Memphis and Charleston Rail- 
road was in operation from Memphis to Grand Junction, fifty-two 
miles. On the 2d of August following we ran through to Holly 
Springs, on the Mississippi Central road, twenty-five mUes south of 
Grand Junction. On Augast 6 we ran to Waterford and Tallahatchie 
River, 100 miles from Memphis. We moved Maj. Gen. A. J. Smith and 
command to that point. We continued to run to that point until the 
18th day of August, when we abandoned the Mississippi Central road. 
On the 22d day of August an order was received to open it again. 
We did so in two days, but there being no guards upon the road the 
bridges were destroyed, and we did not run the road after the 2dd of 
August. On the 29th day of August I received an order to evacuate 
the Memphis and Charleston road, and on the 6th day of September we 
ran to White's Station, ten miles from Memphis, to the heieidquarters 
of the cavalry division. The road was kept open that distance until 
the middle of October, when we abandoned the road altogether and 
did not open it again until the 20th of December. We repaired the 
road to Collierville, twenty-four miles, and kept it open until the 1st 
day of January, 1865, when we again evacuated. Between the open- 
ing and closing of the road at different times the bridge force was 
getting out timber, ties, Ac, and framing bridges preparatory to 
another move. 

I received another order on the 28th day of February to open the 
road again. We repaired it a distance of fifteen mile^, took out forage 
and supplies for an exx>edition, and evacuated on the 4th of Maixsh. 
Remained to close up until the 20th of March, when an order was 
received to again open the road. Found the road badly damaged. 
We had it opened to Collierville,*twenty-f our miles, on the 24th of 
March; to La Fayette, thirty-one miles, on the 24 of April. We 



64 OOBRESPONDEHCE, ST€. 

f onnd heavy work to be done between La Fayette and Moscow. 
Heavy rains at this time, and water so high that no work conld be 
done for several days. Road open to Moscow, thirty-nine mil^ on 
the 13th day of May; to La Grange, forty-nine miles, on the 14th day 
of May; to Grand Junction, fifty-two, on the 20th day of May. Rega- 
lar trains ran to Grand Junction only until the 1st day of July, when 
road was opened to Pocahontas, seventy-five miles distance from 
Memphis, to which point we are now running r^ularly. The opening 
and closing of the line was so frequent that we conld do hardly any- 
thing else. Each time the road was badly damaged, eveiything in 
the way of bridges, trestles, cattle guards, ^., being destroyed, 
together with several miles of track burned or thrown from the road 
bed. The uncertainty of what use we might have for the road, or 
when we would be called upon to repair it, caused me to keep con- 
siderable of a force ready at all times that could not all the time be 
advantageously employed. The machine-shops have been running 
throughout the year. Since the Ist of July, 1864, we have rebuilt five 
locomotives, three of which had hardly any machinery on them, 
nothing but the frames and boilers and part of the cylinders; no 
tnicks or driving wheels, and nothing but the iron for the tanks. I 
sent to the Rogers Works, Norris & Sons, and to Lancaster, Pa., for 
the duplicate machinery. They are now first-class locomotives. We 
also gave a general overhauling and repairing to four others, which 
are now in fine order and running. We have thirteen altogether in 
running order, eleven of which are No. 1, one of the remaining two 
needing heavy repairs, the other light repairs. Three more in the 
shops l3eing rebuilt, one of which will be out about the Ist of August; 
the other two, perhaps, one month later. We have built ten new box- 
cars and four hand-cars. A large majority of the cars on this road 
were in bad order and have all been repaired. 

The Mobile and Ohio Railroad from Columbus, Ky., has not been 
in operation during the year until May 15, 1865, when the road was 
opened to Union City, twenty-six miles. A small force was retained 
during the year and one large trestle near Columbus repaired. Cars 
and engines were repaired. Some bridge timber and a few cross-ties 
were provided. I can get no data of the Memphis and Little Rock 
Railroad prior to the date that I took charge. May 1, 1865. Work has 
been done on this road at a great disadvantage owing to the want of 
proper facilities for keeping road and stock in repair. No machine- 
shops, engine-houses, or other buildings until recently. I have 
finished one engine-house with ten stalls and machine-shop attached, 
a carpenter's shop for repairs of ears, &c., and several other small 
buildings used for storing, offices, Ac. They were partly finished 
when I took charge, and most of the material was on hand for finish- 
ing. Heavy work was necessary on road bed and track to make it 
safe. It is now in good order. Sickness prevails there to a lai^e 
extent, rendering it imperative to keep a much larger number of 
employes than would otherwise be necessary in order to have well 
ones enough to operate the road. At times fully one-half of our force 
are unable for duty. 

Very respectfully, yours, A?c., 

A. F. GOODHUE, 
Engineer and Superinfenclent Military Railroads^ 

Departments Tennessee and Arkansas. 



UNION AUTHORITIES. 65 

Washington, Jtdy i, 1865. 
Hon. E. M. Stanton, 

Secretary of War: 
From present indications I think it perfectly safe to master ont of 
service the remaining veteran regiments of the Army of the Potomac 
and of the Army of the Tennessee. I would therefore respectfully 
recommend that orders be issued for such muster out. 

U. S. GRANT, 

LieiUenantr Oeneral. 



Gbnbral Orders, ) War Dept., Adjt. General's Office, 

No. 121. f Washington, July i, 1865, 

The assignment of medical officers as medical directors, assistant 
medical directors, and acting medical inspectors of armies, army 
corps, and divisions is discontinued. 

Medical directors will be assigned to the headquarters of military 
geographical departments only, and by the order of the Secretary of 
War. 

Owing to the reduction of the Army, the act of Congress approved 
February 25, 1865, becomes inoperative, and no increase of rank, pay, 
or emoluments pertains to such assignment. 
By order of the Secretary of War: 

E. D. TOWNSEND, 
Assistant Adjutant- Oeneral. 



Circular ( War Dept., Adjutant-General's Office, 

No. 30. ) Washington^ July i, 1865, 

orders and instructions relative to the muster out of vol- 
unteer white troops. 

Surplus troops — infantry, cavalry, and artillery — in all departments 
and armies, exclusive of the Department of the Gnlf, Army of the 
Tennessee, Provisional Corps Army of the Potomac, First Army 
Corps, and command in Texas. 
I. Surplus troops. 

Tblborah and } War Department, Adjutant-General's Office, 

Circular. ( Wa^Ungton, June 30, 1SG5. 

The Secretanr of War directs that the strength of yonr command be imme- 
diately reduced, for all arms, to the minimum necessary to meet the requirements 
of the service, and all sarplus troops mastered oat. 

The masters oat will be by entire organizations, incladinpr all additions thereto 
by recrnits and from other sources. In selecting the organizations for discharge, 
preference will be given to veteran regiments having the shortest time to serve. 

The masters oat and discharges, except for artillery, will be made under the 
regolationspromalgated in General Orders, No. 94, current series, from this office. 
Troops of the artillery arm will be forwarded to the designated State rendezvoas 
in the respective States (see Circular No. 19, current series, from this office), 
there to be mastered oat under the direction of the chief mastering officer for the 
SUte. 

Please forward to this office without delay a list of the regiments, batteries, 
and independent companies yoa may select for discharge under this order, giving 
therein, for each, the strength, present and absent, respectively. 

6 R R--SERIES ni, VOL Y 



54 COBBESPONDENCB, ETC. 

War Depaetment, Adjutant-General's Office, 

June IS, 1865, 
Governor of Maine: 

Under instmctions of the Secretary of War, chief mustering officers 
have been ordered to turn over to Your Excellency the colors in their 
charge, under paragraph V of Greneral Orders, No. 94, current series, 
at such time as you may designate. 
Please to communicate your wishes to the said officers. 

THOMAS M. VINCENT, 

Aasistard Ac^jiUant-Qeneral. 

(Same to Governors of New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, 
Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, 
Delaware, Maryland, West Virginia, Ohio, Indiana, Kentucky, Illi- 
nois, Missouri, Iowa, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Michigan, Kansas.) 



General Orders, ) War Deft., Adjt. General's Office, 

No. 113. ) Washington, June 16, 1866. 

ORDER IN RELATION TO SALE OF UNSERVICEABLE QUARTERMASTER'S 

PROPERTY. 

I. Chief quartermasters of military departments, the chief of the 
inspection division, and the regularly assigned inspectors of tho 
Quartermaster's Department will immediately cause to be made and 
forwarded to the Quartermaster-General invoices of such articles ol 
clothing, camp and garrison equipage, and quartermaster's stores as, 
on x)ersonal inspection, they may find unserviceable or worthless to 
the Government; and also of such articles as it would be more eco- 
nomical to the Government to sell than to ship to other points. The 
latter invoices will be separate from the former. The sale of the 
property embraced in these invoices having been approved by the 
Quartermaster-General, they will be submitted to the Secretary of 
War for his orders. All proceedings subsequent to any order of sale 
that may be given will be conducted according to the Regulations, by 
due advertisement, &c. 

II. No sale of public buildings, barracks, quarters, stables, A»c., 
will be made except on an order of the Quartermaster-General, 
approved by the Secretary of War, indorsed upon a report to be made 
in each case in the usual form. 

By orderof the Secretary of War: 

E. D. TOWNSEND, 
Assistant AdjiUant-Oeneral. 



General Orders, ) War Dept., Adjt. General's Office, 

No. 114. ) Washington, June 16, 1866, 

Soldiers honorably discharged will be permitted to retain, without 
charge, their knapsacks, haversacks, and canteens. 
By order of the Secretary of War: 

E. D. TOWNSEND, 
Assistant AdjutarvtrOeneral, 



UNION AUTHORITIES. 56 

General Orders, ) War Dept., Adjt. General's Office, 
No. 115. J WashingtoTiy June 15, 1865. 

The payment of all U. S. bounties to men enlisting in the militaiy 
aemoe will cease from and after Jnly 1, 1865. 
By order of the Secretary of War: 

E. D. TOWNSEND, 
Assistant Ac^tUani- General. 



Circular) War Dept., Adjutant-General's Office, 

No. 25. ) WashingUm, June 15, 1865. 

Officers or enlisted men who may hereafter be commissioned (under 
first appointments) by the Governors of States to regiments or com- 
panies of volunteers serving in Texas will be furnished with free 
transportation on Government transports to the respective stations of 
their regiments or companies. Existing regulations are amended 
accordingly. 

The presentation of a Governor's commission will be sufficient to 
secure a transportation order from the proper officer of the Quarter- 
master's Department. 

By order of the Secretary of War: 

E. D. TOWNSEND, 
Assistant Ac^uiant- General. 

Hdqrs. State of Arkansas, Adjt. Gen.'s Office, 

LitOe Bock, June 15, 1865. 
Hon. Edwin M. Stanton, 

Secretary of War, Washington, D. (7.: 
Sir: I am requested by His Excellency the Governor of the State to 
ask that the citizens of Arkansas now serving in the regiments of 
other States be mustered out of the service. There is a large class of 
this class of soldiers on duty in the Department of Arkansas and 
elsewhere in regiments from Missouri and Kansas, and somewhat 
from Iowa and Illinois. Many of their families are in the State in the 
most destitute condition, while othera are refugees and equally requir- 
ing their assistance. It is also a matter of very great importance in 
the maintenance of law and order, and the restoration of i>eace and 
quiet throughout the State, that they should be permitted to return 
to their homes at the earliest possible moment to secure that pre- 
ponderance of tried loyal sentiment so necessary in the present 
emergency. 
I have the honor to remain, very respectfully, your obedient sei*vant, 

A. W. BISHOP, 
AdjuJUintr General. 

General Orders, ) War Dept., Adjt. General's Office, 

No. 116. J Washington, June 17, 1865. 

Enlisted men of the Veteran Reserve Corps who, if they had 
remained in the volunteer regiments from which they were trans- 
ferred to the Veteran Reserves, would, under existing orders, now be 
entitled to muster out of service, will be so discharged, provided 
that no man shall be mustered out who desires to serve his full term. 
By order of the Secretary of War: 

E. D. TOWNSEND, 
Assistant Adjutant- General. 



56 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. 

Circular ) War Dept., Adjutant-General's Office, 

No. 2G. f Washington, June 17, 1865. 

ORDERS AND INSTRUCTIONS RELATIVE TO THE MUSTER OUT AND 
DISCHARGE OF CERTAIN VOLUNTEER TROOPS. 

White troops (except Veteran Reserve Corps) whose terms expire prior 
to October 1, 1805; artillery in the Annies of the Potomac (includ- 
ing Ninth Corps), Tennessee, and Georgia; dismounted cavalry 
in all armies and departments; all cavalry in the Department of 
the East, and certain infantr}' in the Northern Department and 
Department of the East. 

Telegram.] War Department, Adjutant-General's Office, 

Washington, May 17, 1866. 
Maj. Q«n. George G. Meade, 

Commanding Army of the Potomac: 

The Secretary of War directs that all volanteer organizations of white troops 
in your command whose terms of service expire between this date and September 
80 next, inclasive, be immediately mustered out of service. 

The musters out will be made with existing regimental and company organisa- 
tions, and under the regulations promulgated in General Orders, No. 94, of the 
15th instant, from this office. 

All men in the aforesaid organizations whose terms of service expire subsequent 
to October 1, 1865, will be transferred to other organizations from the same State; 
to veteran regiments when practicable, and when not practicable to regiments 
having the longest time to serve. 

It is proper to add that this order will discharge as follows: 

First. Tne three-years' regiments that were mustered into service under the call 
of July 2, 1862, and prior to October 1 of that year. 

Second. Three-years' recruits mustered into service for old regiments between 
the same dates. 

Third. One-year's men for new and old organizations, who entered the service 
between May 17 and October 1, 1864. 

Please acknowledge receipt of this. 

THOMAS M. VINCENT, 

Aasistant Adjutant-General. 

Note. — Orders and instructions, as in the foregoing, were applied to the Army 
of the Tennessee and Army of Georgia, under the commana of Major-General 
Sherman, June 18, 1865. 

Telegram.] War Department, Adjutant-General's Office, 

Washington, May 18, 1865. 
Maj. Gen. George G. Meade, 

Commanding Army of the Potomac: 

In connection with the telegram order of yesterday, relative to the discharge of 
troops whose terms expire prior to October 1, and referring to paragraph IV, Gen- 
eral Orders, No. 94, current series, I am directed to say that it is of importance 
that the muster-out rolls should be ready in the shortest time possible. 

Extra clerks should be detailed to assist the commissaries of musters and their 
assistants. 

In the absence of rooms for use as offices, hospital and wall tents should be 
provided for the use of mustering officers in making out the necessary papers. 
All other proper facilities at command should also be afforded. 

The attention of corps, division, and brigade commanders should be particularly 
directed to what is required of them under paragraph IV, General Orders, No. 94. 

Assistant inspectors-general should be directed to frequently visit regiments 
and companies, to see in person if the data for the rolls and other papers are 
promptly and accurately furnished by renmental and company officei*s, confer- 
ring with the commissaries of musters and their assistants with the view of cor- 
recting at once any delinquencies they may find to exist. 

THOMAS M. VINCENT, 

Assistant Adjutant-Oeneral. 

Note.— The foregoing instructions were applied to the Army of the Tennessee 
and Army of Georgia, May 18, 1865, and to otner armies and departments, except 
Department of the East, Northern Department, Departments of the Pacific and 
New Mexico, June 2, 1865. 



UNION AUTHORITIES. 57 

War Department. Ad Jtrr ant-General's Office, 

Washinfftan, May 2U. ISCr,, 

TELBORAK TO COMMANDINQ OENERALS OF ALL ARMIES AND DEPARTMENTS, EXCEPT 
ARMIES OP THE POTOMAC, TENNESSEE, AND GEORGIA, AND DEPARTMENTS OF 
THE BAST, PACIFIC, NEW MEXICO, AND NORTHERN DEPARTMENT. 

The Secretaxy of War directs that all volnxiteer organizationR of white troops 
in yonr command whose terms of service expire between this date and September 
90 next, inclusive, be immediately mustered out of service. 

The musters out will be made with existing regimental and company organiza- 
tions, and under the regrulations promulgated in General Orders, No. 94, of the 
15th instant, from this office. 

AH men in the aforesaid organizations whose terms of service expire subsequent 
to October 1 will be transferred to other organizations from the same State; to 
veteran regiments when practicable, and when not practicable to regiments hav- 
ing the longest time to serve. 

It is proper to add that this order will discharge as follows: 

First. Tne three-years' regiments that were mustered into service under the call 
of July 2, 1B63, and prior to October 1 of that year. 

Second. Three-years' recruits mustered into service for old regiments between 
the same dates. 

Third. One-year's men for new and old organizations who entered the service 
prior to October 1. 1864. 

Should your command be reduced prejudicially to the service by this order, you 
are authorized to suspend it in whole or m part, promptly notifying the Adjutant- 
General of the Army, with a view to receiving further instructions. 

Please acknowledge receipt of this. 

THOMAS M. VINCENT, 

Assistant Adjutant-OenercU, 

Telegram.] War Department, Adjtttant-General's Office, 

Washington, May 20, JSG6, 
Haj. Gen. Oeoroe G. Meade, 

Commanding Army of tlie Potomac, 
Mig. Gen. John G. Parke. 

Commanding Ninth Army Corps: 

circular to commanding generals armies of GEORGIA AND TENNESSEE, 
through headquarters MIUTARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI. 

The Secretary of War directs that all the volunteer artillery of your command 
(army) be immediately mustered out and discharged. 

For this arm of the service General Orders, No. 94, current series, from this 
office, is so modified as to allow said troops to be sent to their respective States, 
tiiere to be mustered out under the direction of the chief mustering officer of the 
State. 

Prior to their denarture all public property will be turned over to the proper 
officers of the supply departments concerned for the command with which they 
mav be serving. 

Tlie troops should be placed en route with the least practicable delay, and for- 
wuided to the respective rendezvous in their States at or nearest which they were 
mustered in. 

Please acknowledge receipt of this. 

THOMAS M. VINCENT, 

Assistant Adjutant-General. 

War Department, Adjutant-General's Office, 

Washington. June 5, 18(>6, 

TELEGRAM TO COMMANDING GENERALS OF ALL ARMIES AND DEPARTMENTS. EXCEPT- 
ING DEPARTMENTS OF THE EAST AND THE NORTHERN. 

The Secretary of War directs that all dismounted volunteer cavalry of your 
command be immediately discharged the service. 

The musters out will be made by commissaries of musters and their assistants, 
and the troops afterward forwarded to their respective States for payment. 

The general principles of General Orders, No. 94, current series, from this office, 
will he applied in executing this order. 



70 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. 

expedition was delayed nearly four days on account of a pontoon bridge 
stretched across the James River, about twenty-five miles below City 
Point, upon which the Army of the Potomac was ci*os8ing to the south 
bank of the river. Immediately on the arrival of the construction 
force at City Point (June 18, 18<)4) orders were received to rebuild the 
City Point and Petersburg Railroad ; also to construct wharves and 
buUdings for the use of the army in unloading and receiving supplies. 
An examination was made of the road, and it was ascertained that the 
bridges were gone, track taken up, and the iron removed for a distance 
of four miles. From there on to within two miles and a half from 
Petersburg the tnu?k had not been disturbed, but the ties were very 
much decayed and the gauge needed changing from five feet to four 
feet eight and one-half inches. By the 5th of July the bridges were 
all rebuilt, track repaired, and the road was in complete running 
order for a distance of seven miles from City Point. By the time the 
repairs were completed a full equipment of engines and rolling-stock 
had been received, and i-egular trains commenced running July 7, 
1 864. A large force was kept constantly employed in building wharves, 
warehouses, and all other improvements asked for by Quartermaster's 
Department. 

Orders were received July 22 to make a preliminary survey of a 
branch line of railroad from a point near Pitkin Station (distant 
five miles and a half from City Point) to the headquarters of the 
Fifth Army Corps, on tlie Weldon railroad at Yellow House. The 
survey was ma^le (without instruments) and everything got in readi- 
ness for tlie proposed extension. An explosion occurred on the 9th 
of August, caused b}' tlie accidental ignition of ammunition stored 
in an ordnance boat lying at the wharf at City Point. The force 
of the explosion completely demolished some -RK) feet of warehouse 
just completed and a large portion of the wharves in the vicinity; 
also a large quantity of supplies accumulated for shipment to the 
front. The damage to railroad property was very slight, and only a 
few of our men were injured. July 20 a force of trackmen equipped 
with tools were sent to Deep Bottom to report to General Sheridan, 
for the supposed purpose of destroying the track of tlie railroad con- 
necting. Petersburg with Richmond. Tl'iey returned July 30 without 
effecting anything of importance. Again, August 13 another party 
in charge of John Morgan, iussistant engineer, wiis ordered to rei>ort 
to General Hancock for the purpose of destroying tlie track on the 
Weldon railroad. Nine miles and a quarter of track were destroyed, 
and the iron nuide useless by heating and then bending the rails. 

Orders were received August 30 to commence building Army Line 
from Pitkin Statiim to Yellow Tavern, on the Weldon railroad. 
Work was commenced September 1, and by the 10th of September the 
new line was completed a distance of nine miles from Pitkin Station 
and fourteen miles and a half from City Point. The grading on the 
new line was comparatively light, but some very extensive tn^stle- 
works were constructed. For quite a distance the rebel batteries had 
full range of the track, and trains passing and.our Construction Corps 
wei-e much annoyed by the constant fire kept up on them. This diffi- 
culty, however, was obviated by the construction of a line of earth- 
works about half a mile in length, completely protecting the road. 

Extensive tracks for the accommodation of the hospitals and bak- 
eries were built; also very large warehouses for the storage of quar- 
termaster, commissary, and ordnance stores. Substantial and roomy 
wharves were built for a distance of nearly one mile at City Point; 



UNION AUTHORITIES. 71 

also wharves at Bermticla Ilundrod and Light-House Point. An exten- 
sion wharf was built on the Appomattox River for the accommodation 
of the hospitals. Water tanks and steam pumping engines were also 
furnished to keep up an adequate supply of water. The construction 
of hospital buildings on a very large scale for the several army corps 
was orden»d October 8. After most of the lumber and other material 
had arrived at City Point the plans were changed. They concluded 
to build them more temporary than was at first proposed. One hundred 
and t«n of these buildings were constructed during the fall and winter. 
While this work for the accommodation of the army was being done 
the various improvements to facilitate the ojwrations of the road were 
not neglected. The road bed was put in first-rate order, and the track 
would compare favorably with any first-class road. During the month 
of October the yard at City Point was enlarged, switches and sidings 
were put in, tnm-tables were constructed at all necessary points, a 
substantial and convenient engine-house was built capable of accom- 
modating nine locomotive engines; also shops with all the requisite 
machinery for the repairs of engines and ears. At all the stations on 
the line sidings were laid and station-houses built. An average of 
nine trains, exclusive of specials, were run each way daily, amply 
supplying the wants of the army, llie amount of rolling-stock for 
the working of the road was increased from time to time, as the 
demands for transportation became more heavy. Orders were re- 
ceived October 22 to proceed' with the extension of the City Point 
and Army Line from General Warren's headquartere at the Yellow 
House to the Peebles house, a distance of two miles and a quarter. 

The work on this extension (now called the Patrick Branch) did 
not commence until November 2 on account of an engagement that 
took place near where the proposed line was to run. It was completed 
with all the necessary sidings November 9. The grading was not 
very heavy on account of our conforming to the surface of the ground. 
The grades are heavy (a maximum of 228 feet). Eight hundred and 
fifty feet of trestle-work, averaging twenty feet in height, was built. 
During its construction the weather was very unfavorable, it raining 
nearly all the time, making it almost impossible to do any work on 
track. 

From November 10 to December 19 the construction force were 
busily engaged in constructing hospital buildings, repairing wharves, 
laying a<kiitional side tracks, and building quarters for the Quarter- 
master's Department and railroad enii)loyes. A large clothing ware- 
house and extensive commissary buildings were then built; also dis- 
tribution ban*acks for the accommodation of the troops passing 
through City Point. The coal wharf at City Point and a large 
wharf at Hcrniuda Hundred were also completed. Trains continued 
to run on good time without accidents, business constantly increas- 
ing. Some days ftft^^en trains were run over the road each way. 
Work was coninu^nctHl DeeemlH*r 21 on a branch line of road running 
from nancock Station, on the main Anny Line, to Fort Hlaisdell, on 
tlie Jerusaileni plank road. It was completed December 29, but trains 
did not run over it for sonu^ days after on account of the very wet 
weathf»r, which made it impossible to get the track in good order. 
January 2 orders were received to extend this branch line still 
fartlier, to the headquartei's of Cxeneral Crawford, who commanded 
one division of the Fifth Army Corps, a distance of two miles and a 
quart<»r fi"oni IJaneo4»k Station. Work was immediately commenced, 
but owing to the inclement weather progress was not very rapid. 



72 C0RKE8P0NDENC£, ETC. 

The track was laid, 1,040 feet of trestle-work 18 feet high was built, 
and the line opened by January 20. Station-houses, platfomis, and 
water-stations were built. 

This line is called the Gregg Branch of the City Point and Army 
Line. During January a plank road, extending the whole length of 
the wharves at City Point, was built. Orders were received from 
Lieutenant-General Grant January 25 to send a construction force 
(with materials) to Beaufort, N. C, to repair railroad running inland 
as far as Winton. In obedience, I dispatched Mr. C. L. McAlpine, 
principal assistant engineer, in charge of a force of carpenters and 
trackmen, with tools, camp equipage, and material, from City Point 
for that place, January 26, on steamers Detroit, Rebecca Barton, and 
Charles Barton. The whole force reached New Berne without any 
serious detention January 30. They immediately went to work relay- 
ing track, getting out cross-ties, and rebuilding bridges. By Feb- 
ruary 2 tiie track was repaired to Batchelder's Creek bridge, and 
bridge rebuilt. February 5 Col. W. W. Wright, chief engineer, with 
his construction force, arrived at Moreliead City. Our party kept at 
work till February 8, when they were I'elieved by Colonel Wright's 
force and embarked for City Point the same day. The whole force 
arrived at City Point February 12, in time to take part in the exten- 
sion of the Army Line. From January 25 to February 12 the construc- 
tion force remaining at City Point were engaged in constructing 
quarters, oflBces, &c., for the Quartermaster's Department, repairing 
and extending wharves, and building a large wharf at Deep Bottom, 
on the James River, and keeping the track of the City Point and 
Army Line and branches in good repair. Our forces made an advance 
to the left of Peteraburg February 5, and after three days' fighting 
succeeded in gaining and holding a position on the Vaughan road, a 
distance of about five miles in advance of their former line. 

An oixler was received February 8 to extend the Army Line, The 
proposed extension was located the 12th. The line, leaving Warren 
Station, ran down the old bed of the Weldon railroad ab<»ut two miles, 
then, diverging to the right, across the most favorable ground to the 
Cummings house, on the Vaughan road, a distance of five miles from 
Warren Station. Work was commenced February 13 and completed 
to the Cummings house (Ilumplu'eys Station) on the 24th. We also 
furnished all the necessary sidings, buildings, platfonns, water sta- 
tions, and Y for the proper working of the road. During the prog- 
ress of this work the weather was very unfavorable, raining almost 
without intermission, making the ground so soft that it was almost 
impossible to do any work or get the teams over it with material. Two 
thousand seven hundred and eighty-one feet of trestle-work was built 
on this extension, averaging twenty-five feet high. Most of the timber 
was cut in the woods and hauled to the work with teams detailed for 
that purpose. A number of hospital cars were fitted up for the pur- 
pose of moving the sick and wounded from the front and along the 
line to City Point. These were kept in almost constant use. Trains 
were running regularly and amply supplying all the wants of the 
army. In- addition to the regular freight business two passenger 
trains were run each way daily for the accommodation of mails, offi- 
cers, and othei-s, to and from the front. At the time of building the 
Army Line many of the officers of the Army of the Potomac, together 
with the regular Engineer Corps, denounced this location, declaring 
that it would Ik* impossible for an engine alone to ascend the heavy 
grades; and as for furnishing the necessary supplies for the army 



UNION AUTHOBITIES. 73 

over it, they considered it altogether out of the question. It was dis- 
covered, however, that engines hauled an average of fifteen loaded 
cars i)er train, and in many cases twenty-three loaded cars, with one 
of our ordinary engines, thus demonstrating the practicability of 
supplying a large army over a temporary road constructed in this 
manner. The total length of track laid on Army Line, branches, and 
sidings was 21 miles 3,965 feet, and total length of trestle work, 1 
mUe 1,303 feet, an average of twenty-one feet high. 

Not much of note in railroad affairs occurred from February 28 
to April 3. The construction department was kept busy making 
additional improvements wherever needed, and building a wharf at 
City Point in the gap between the quartermaster's and railroad 
wharves. I also increased our force and made heavy additions to our 
rolling-stock, iron, timber, and other material in anticipation of a 
movement of our army. April 3, immediately after the successful 
advance of our forces, we abandoned the Army Line and commenced 
relaying the track taken up on the South Side Railroad to Petersburg, 
our troops having taken possession ot that place on the morning of 
the 3d. The road was opened and in running order to Petersburg 
April 4. A large force was set to work changing the gauge of side- 
tracks and switches in yard at Petersburg from live feet to four feet 
eight and a half inches, to suit our rolling-stock. We also commenced 
changing the gauge on main line of South Side Railroad and completed 
it to Burkeville, sixty- two miles from City Point, April 11, and trains 
commenced running through with supplies to that point. The road 
was found to be in wretched condition. The ties were decayed and 
worthless, and most of the iron nearly worn out. For two or three 
days it was with the greatest difficulty that trains could be got over 
the road; but very soon the condition of it was improved by placing 
a large construction force at work renewing ties, relaying and repairing 
the track. Trains commenced to run regularly and on time without 
any accident of a serious nature, and easily filling all requisitions for 
transportation. We also opened the Petersburg and Richmond Rail- 
road, and regular trains commenced running from City Point to 
Manchester (opposite Richmond), via Petersburg, April 7. On the 
24th of April orders were received through General Ingalls to make 
the necessary repairs on the Richmond and Danville Railroad and 
open communication with Danville, and also to advance on the South 
Side Railroad and rebuild the High Bridge near Farmville, seventy- 
six miles fi-om City Point. I sent a large force with material to this 
bridge, but before the work was fairly under way the order was 
countermanded. April 30 an order was received from you to suspend 
all work on repairs or rebuilding railroads in Virginia, and only 
finish such improvements as had been commenced and were nearly 
completed. In compliance, immediate steps were taken to reduce the 
expenses in the different departments. As soon as the men could be 
spared the greater part of the Construction Corps and transportation 
departments were sent to Alexandria and discharged. 

By the 1st of June all the force that possibly could be spared had 
been discharged, and only a sufficient number retained to insure the 
successful oi)eration of the roads. Twenty-four new locomotive 
engines and alx)ut 275 new box-cars (all 5-feet gauge) arrived at City 
Point, loaded on a fleet of about ninety vessels. By your directions 
this stock was sent to Manchester (opposite Richmond) and there 
unloaded. A wharf bad to be built, long sidings laid, and connections 
made with the Richmond and Danville road for the purpose of storage. 



74 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. 

Possession was taken of the machine-shops at Manchester belonging 
to Richmond and Danville road, and a force engaged to put the 
engines and cars in proper condition before they were sold. Most of 
the stock had been on board vessels for nearly three months, exx)osed 
to all kinds of weather, and was in bad condition when received. 

During the month of June the Array Line Railroad was taken up and 
material brought to City Point. All proper rty not in use was collected 
from the lines of the several roads and brought to City Point for shii>- 
ment. Regular trains were run on the South Side and Richmond and 
Petersburg roads, connecting with trains on Richmond and Danville 
road, amply supplying all the troops along tlie lines. A large number 
of' discharged troops were brought to City Point, and transportation 
furnished a large numlx»r of rebel troops returning to their homes. 

July 3 the Petersburg and Richmond Railroad was turned over to 
the company, and the Richmond and Danville road was turned over 
July 4. All material and rolling-stock that <^ould be spared had in 
the meantime been shipped to Alexandria. We continued running 
the South Side Railroad from City Point to Uurkeville, transporting 
supplies and large numbers of troops en route north from North 
Carolina, until July 24. At this date the road was turned over to the 
company, which closed up our operations of military railroads at 
City Point. The whole force (with the exception of some sixteen 
men left to take chargi^ of property, &c.) were brought to Alexandria 
and discharged. All the property has been removed from City Point, 
with the exception of some material wliich will remain there until sold. 
Mr. C. L. McAlpine, principal -assistant engineer, in charge of con- 
struction d(»partment, and G. M. Huntington, superintendent, in 
charge of transportation department on this line, were pei-severing 
in the dischargij of their varied and arduous duties. May 15 Mr. 
McAlpine having resigned his position, Mr. T. D. Hays wjis then 
appointed '*in charge" of all our railroad operations at City Point; 
an<l to liim I am indebted for valuable assistance rendered. 

PETERSBURG AND RICHMOND RAILROAD AND CLOVER HILL BRANCH. 

When Petersburg and Richmond were abandoned by the enemy, 
April 3, and during the time we wt^i-e changing the gauge and mak- 
ing an advance on South Side Railroad, orders were received to oi)en 
commiinication with Richmond. A trestle bridge 400 feet Um^ and 
12 feet high had to be built, connecting with bridge over the Appo- 
mattox River at Petersburg. The road was opened April 7. Two 
regular passeng(»r trains were run each way daily from City Point to 
Manchester (opposite Richmond), by way of Pett'rsburg. No freight 
business of any note was done until the last of April, when orders 
were received to establish a depot at Manchester in oi'der to provide 
the Army of the Potomac aiul (ieneral Slu^nnan's ai-my with supplies 
previous to their nuirch to Alexandria and Washington. Sidings 
and platforms were built and large quantities of supplies sent for- 
ward from City Point. All oiders on us for transport at ion were filled 
prompt 13% In coiuu^etion with this roa<l we o[)erat(Ml the Clover Hill 
Branch, a coal road diverging from Ww main line nine miles from 
Petersburg, and running up to coal mines, a <listance of eight<H>n 
mih's. Ti»is iH'came nec^'ssary on account of tlu* scarcity of coal in 
Richmon<l and PeU'rsburg. One train daily wius run, carrying all 
the coal that was loaded in cai-s at the mines. Ait<^'r iho armies 



UNION AUTHORITIES. 75 

moved from Manchester but little business was done on these roads. 
Application having been made by Governor Peirpoint to have the 
road transferred to the company, by your order it was turned over 
July 3, and all material, <fcc., removed to City Point. 

RICHMOND AND DANVILLE RAILROAD. 

On the evacuation of Richmond, and during the time our army was 
advancing, it became necessary to rebuild a number of the railroads 
that had been used by the enemy during the wt . By orders received 
from you April 20 I made an examination of this road. It w^fi 
found to be in good order, with the exception of the bridges over 
Appomattox and Staunton Rivers, and about 2,000 feet of track were 
destroyed. The officers of the Richmond and Danville Railroad ran 
all their rolling-stock then in running order south of the bridges, and 
subsequently concentrated it at Clover Station, as a point midway 
between our two grand armies, and it was then captured by the 
Sixth Army Corps on its advance to Danville. April 24, I I'eceived 
orders, through Greneral Ingalls, to make the necessary i*epairs and 
open communicatiou with Danville ; work was commenced on Staun- 
ton River bridge April 26, and it was completed May 2. The bridge 
Ls 600 feet long and 40 feet high. All the timber used in constructing 
it was cut in the surrounding woods, and hauled to the bridge by 
teams detailed for that purpose. During the progress of the work 
trains were run between the river and Danville for transportation of 
supplies. Twenty cars of subsistence stores received from wagon 
trains wei-e taken to Danville, and the First Brigade, First Division, 
Sixth Army Corps, brought from Danville to the bridge to await the 
rorapletion for further transportation. On completion of the bridge. 
May 2, four trains of troops were sent to Burkeville. Transportation 
of balance of First Division commenced at once and was completed 
May 5 ; the entire division of 8,000 men employing 253 ears, in 
twenty-one trains. May 6 commenced transportation of captured 
oi-dnance, ordnance stoi*es, arsenal machinery, <fec., from Danville to 
Burkeville ; thence by way of South Side Railroad to City Point, 
amounting in all to 300 car-loads, in thirty trains; finished May 15. 
May 10 commenced moving balance of Sixth Army Corps, numbering 
about 18,000 men, with usual baggage, officers' horses, ifec, from Dan- 
ville to Manchester, 140 miles. This work employed forty-five trains, 
or 408 cars, and was finished May 22, In addition to this business 
WHS transi)ortatiou of supplies for the Sixth Army Corps while at 
Danville. Crowds of negroes and paroled prisoners going north and 
south. After passage of Sixth Corps to June 15 but little business 
was done, consisting principally of transportation of mails, supplies, 
4fec., for posts at Danville, Keysville, and Amelia Court-House; occa- 
sional regiments for points on line, some from Lynchburg by way of 
Burkeville Junction to Richmond. June 15 commenced transporta- 
tion of large numbers of paroled prisoners to Danville, which con- 
tinued until surrendering the road to Board of Public Works of 
Virginia, at the rate of 804 per day, and total of 15,600. June 22 com- 
menced transportation of troops arriving at Danville from North 
Carolina for the north, by way of Burkeville and City Point; this 
continued until surrender of the road July 4, amounting to 7,250 
soldiers, 115 horses, and 15 cai*s baggage. The cars on this road were 
found in very bad condition and nmuy set aside. The locomotives 



76 C0BRS8P0NDENCE, ETC. 

were eighteen in number, belonging as follows: To Richmond and 
Danville road, ten; East Tennessee and Virginia road, five; Nash* 
ville and Chattanooga road, two; and Norfolk and Petersburg road, 
one. We also recaptured U. S. Military Railroad engine Colonel 
McCallum; this one had been captured from us at Bristoe Station, on 
Orange and Alexandria road, in 1862, during General Pope's retreat, 
taken south to Danville road, changed to 5-feet gauge, and is now 
called Pocahontas. All these were in bad order, but by hard labor 
kept up and caused to do good service. Mr. O. H. Dorrance, for- 
merly of the Winchester and Potomac line, was superintendent of this 
road, and conducted affairs with his usual ability. In consequence 
of the uncertainty of our ox)erations I did not enter upon a thorough 
organization. The old operatives of this road were retained, consid- 
erable reduction from U. S. Military Railroad rates made in their pay, 
as satisfactory to them, a point of economy, and that men just from 
rebellion did not deserve to be rated with old military mil road 
employ^ and loyal men. As City Point was considered the Imse of 
all supplies this is called one of the connecting roads, and the 
accounts are included in the tabular statements opposite City Point 
and connecting roads. 

NORFOLK AND PETERSBURG RAILROAD. 

During the year the business of this road has been only nominal. 
A large amount of wood has been hauled in from the line of the road 
to Norfolk for use of the quartermaster at the post. A flag-of-truce 
train was run to Suffolk about once in two weeks, or whenever called 
upon. The track is in good condition to Suffolk, a distance of 
twenty-three miles; it is laid with iron, sixty-four pounds to yard, 
and is decidedly the best road in Virginia. October 12 Mr. H. F. 
Woodward was appointed assistant superintendent and engineer of 
the Norfolk and Petersburg and Seaboard and Roanoke Railroads, 
vice Mr. P. McCallum, appointed to the sujwrintendency of military 
railroads diverging from Alexandria. April 1 Mr. Phin. B. Tompkins 
was appointed superintendent in charge, and Mr. Woodward trans- 
ferred to City Point. This road was opemted in connection with the 
Seaboard and Roanoke road and rolling-stock used on either rosid as 
occasion demanded, a connection having previously been made at 
Suffolk between the two roads. Possession of this road was given to 
the company June 30 and ended our operations at Norfolk and 
Portsmouth, with the exception of a small force left in charge of 
material. 

SEABOARD AND ROANOKE RAILROAD. 

This roa<l has been in use to Suffolk, distance eighteen miles from 
Portsmouth. One daily train, exclusive of specials, has been run to 
that point. Only a small number of troops wei*e stationed on line of 
this roml and at Suffolk, consequently the demands for transportation 
have not been very pressing. A large number of cross-ties have been 
cut along the line of road and hauleil to Portsmouth; from there they 
have been shipped to the several points where military railroads have 
been opened and extended. Fifteen thousand nine hundred and 
ninety-two ties were sent to North Carolina for use of roads running 
inland from Beaufort. By your directiuus, April 6, the new 5-feet- 



UNION AUTHORITIES. 77 

gauge rolling-stock was ordei'ed to Norfolk, with the intention of 
landing it at that x>oint, the object being to open communication 
with Weldon and use this stock on the road. The order was after- 
ward countermanded by you, on account of the cessation of hostili- 
ties, and all the rolling-stock ordered to Manchester (opposite Rich- 
mond), there to be stored until sold. We abandoned this road June 
30 and turned it over to the company, leaving a small force to take 
charge of Government property until sold or removal to Alexandria. 

WINCHESTER AND POTOMAC RAILROAD. 

In obedience to an order received from you August 12 to repair and 
put in working order this road from Harper's Ferry to Halltown (a 
distance of six miles), a construction force with material was sent to 
Harper's Ferry. Repairs were commenced August 14, and regular 
trains commenced running through to Halltown August 19. From 
that date the road was not used to any great extent, and only a limited 
amount of freight was transported until October 20, at which date 
you ordered the extension of the road to Winchester. November 2 
a detachment of our Construction Corps commenced rebuilding the 
road from Halltown. Track was completed to Charlestown (ten miles 
from Harper's Ferry) on the 6th; Summit Point (eighteen miles from 
Harper's Ferry) on the 14th, and Stephenson's (twenty-eight miles 
from Harper's Ferr>') on the 24th. I received orders from General 
Sheridan to make this the terminus of the road, establish depot 
grounds, lay the necessary sidings, and prepare for a heavy business. 
Our rolling-stock consisted of thirteen engines and about seventy-five 
ears, all in good condition. Our railroad employes numbered about 
000 men. December 1 2 Mr. O. H. Dorrance was appointed superin- 
tendent of this line, relieving Mr. Beggs, who was ordered to report to 
Alexandria. The old strap rail was removed from line of road and 
sent to Alexandria, engine-house and machine-shops built at Harper's 
Ferry, and a number of extensive platforms built at Harper's Ferry 
and Stephenson's for the shipping of quartermaster's and commissary 
stores. I also frequently employed a portion of our construction force 
unloading cars at Stephenson's. This was done on account of the 
large amount of freight kept in the cars by quartermasters, they not 
having sufficient force to unload it. During the months of January, 
February, March, and April business continued to be done promptly 
and without any serious accident. April 29 I ordered Mr. Dorrance, 
superintendent, to City Point, for the purpovse of taking charge of the 
Richmond and Danville Railroad, leaving Mr. D. T. Shaw, dispatcher, 
in charge of Winchester and Potomac line. 

In 3Iay business began to slack off. On the 21st the Opequon 
bridge, one of the largest on the road, was swept off by a freshet, 
interfenng with operations for a few days. During the month of 
June I reduced the rolling-stock to ^ve engines and about sixty cars, 
and the force employed on the road to about 175 men, thus carrying 
out your previous order. A total of 3,294 feet of trestle-work, an 
average of 12^ feet high, was built on main track and sidings on this 
road. This ends the report of operations up to this date. I might 
add, however, that all railroad material used in construction of this 
road had to be sent from Alexandria to Harper's Ferry over the Balti- 
more and Ohio road. Most of the railroad iron was shipped direct 
from the Manassas Gap Railroad, where a large force was engaged in 



78 



C0RBE8tK>ND£NGE, BTC. 



removing the track from Piedmont to Manassas Junction; the same 
cars being used in distributing the iron on Winchester nmd as were 
in loading it not forty-eight hours previous on Manassas Gap road. 
It is a fact worthy of note that during a business extending but little 
over seven months, in which time 2,238 trains jiassed over the road, 
carrying nearly 200,000 persons, but one accident of any consequence 
occurred and but one man was killed. The advantages resulting from 
the completion of this line were observable, not only in furnishing 
supplies to the Army of the Shenandoah, but in rapidity with which 
troops could be moved. At the time of moving the Sixth Army Corps, 
the First Division arrived at City Point by way of Washington in 
forty-four hours after leaving Stephenson's, and the Second Division 
in fifty-two hours, saving at least thirty hours by having this short line 
open. Please see tabular statements for further information. This 
sums up the report of my operations in the Department of Virginia 
during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1865. . 

I desire to express my thanks to superintendents, engineers, agents, 
and other employes on the different lines for the manner, in which 
they have discharged their varied and arduous duties. Always dili- 
gent and faithful, they have never been found wanting when called 
on. It is with pleasure I acknowledge the services of Mr. J. M. 
Pitkin, principal assistant, in charge of all business appertaining to 
my duties; his untiring energy and faithful services cannot be too 
highly appreciated. 

Respectfully submitted. 

J. J. MOORE, 
Chief Kngr, and GeiiL Supt Military Railroads of Virginia, 

[Table Xo. 1.] 

Schedule of military railroadu operated in the DejHLrtment of Virginia during 

fiscal year. 



From— 



To, 



WoMliinKtoii and Aloxundria ' WnnhinKton 

Orange mu<1 Al«xan<}ria I AlexMiidria 

Alexandria, Loudoun and Haiiip- do 

shire. | 

Manaeeae Gap Railroad Manacaas 

WlncheRter and Potomao I Harper's Ferry . 

Norfolk and Petersburg ' N orfolk . 



Seaboard and Roanoke . 

City Point and Army 

South Side 

Richmond and Petersburg . 
Richmond and Danville 



Total 

Richmond and Petersburg (Clo- 
rer Hill Branch.) 



Portsmouth . 
City Point.. 

do 

Manchester . 
do 



Alexandria .. . 
(iorduuNTille.. 
LueNburg 



Strasburg .... 
Stephenson's . 
Petersburg . . . 

Weldon 

Humphreys .. 
Lynchburg ... 
Petersburg . . . 
Danyille 









7i 
88 
41 

82 



184 
181 I 

22 
140 



ifos*. irost. 


3 


I* 


M 


1ft 


15 


15 


34 





23 - 
17 
184' 
62 I 

«l 
140 



28 

17 

82 
22 

140 



417 
18 



248 
18 



UNION AUTHORrriBS. 



79 



[Table No. 2.] 
U. 8. MILITARY RAILBOADB. 

I^mnber of penont employed each month during fiscal year ending June SO, 1S6S, 



HoDth. 



July 

Aosmt ... 
SBpMnb6r. ... 

Oetober 

KoTember. .. 
December... 

Jimuury 

FebmazT .. 
Merab 

^.::::::: 

Juw 

TMal 



SI 



i 

16 
9 
11 
12 
16 
19 
19 
18 
21 
22 
22 
24 









, 


1 


B 


1 


1 


a 


8 


{ 


!_ 




M 


1 
1 




4 


1 i 1 




10 


2 1 




11 


2 1 




10 


2 1 1 




14 






10 


2 1 2 




11 






11 


2 2 




18 






16 


1 1 2 




14 1 1 2 




18 


!■ 2 


16 


136 


20 


20 



I 



1 

60 
29 



66 

66 
60 I 

66, 
75 
48 ' 
39 { 



s 

s 

s 



121 

63 

78 
126 
149 
149, 
166 
161 
151 
200 
129 
113 



61 
51 
47 
70 
83 
86 , 
77 1 
76 

'* 

89 

48 ' 



813 I 784 



40 
29 
87 
00 
60 
66 
62 
62 
64 
66 
46 
410 



161 616 



lionth. 



JBly 76 

Aajnwi 64 

September . . . < 82 

October 92 

Vovember 89 

December 103 

Junury 1 11* 

Febniary ....! 117 

Ifarcb .' 128 

AprU 145 

IQy 109 

Jane i Ul 



669 
672 
728 
735 
978 
986 
761 
813 
972 
990 
913 
433 



92 
74 
77 
70 
99 
08 
100 
113 
138 
136 
71 
75 



ToUl... 1.233 9,450 1,142 1,143 :723 210 



101 69 
83 48 
82 64 
99 I 68 



70 
96 
102 
101 
116 
136 
79 
73 



64 177 



l.i 



9 13 1,069 

9 12 014 

21 10 932 

20 ! 10 884 



1,480 
1,260 
1,846 
1,400 
1,841 
2.278 
1,964 
781 



173 Too 16.228 376 | 21 



jl 



36 I.... 
25 I.... 
80 .... 
27 



. I 



I 



2.612 
2.103 
2,369 
2,479 
8,413 
8,241 
3,162 
8,827 
8,926 
4,643 
8.674 
1,988 



135 36, 720 



[Table No. 3.] 
U. B. MILITARY RAILROADS. 

Distribution of labor and material during fiscal year ending June. 



Aoeoant. 



' Freight and 
I cartage. 



.1., 



Alexandria railroada 

CitT Point railroada 1 

WiDcheeter and PotonuM Baflroad 

Korf oil raflroada , 

Virginia raflroada $12,623.89 

North Carolina raOroada ' 

SeTaonah railroada .•>«.•.....•.•.••..••. !... ." 

Baltimore and Oblo Bailroed 

Qpartermaater's Department 

Photogrnph department > 

Telegraph department 



Labor. 



Material. 



$685,099.30 
648,37L90 
305.586.60 
39.863.91 
79.653.67 
2,681.33 
139.38 



Total 12,523.89 



198,036.68 

3.292.53 

306.86 



1,062,478.15 



$474,350.74 

400,063.94 

129,606.76 

26.648.82 

17,676.83 

331.278.01 

9,206.64 

1,300.00 

182,617.46 

8,271.14 

226.43 



1,675,136.66 



Total. 



$1,159,460.04 

1,048,426.84 

435.193.44 

64,904.73 

109,863.39 

383,909.34 

9, 347. 92 

1,300.00 

380,663.04 

6, 563. 67 

532.29 



3,550,133.70 



80 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. 

ITablA No. 4.] 
U. 8. MILITARY RAILROAD6 OF VIROIKIA. 

Schedule of engines^ with cost of maintenance and repairs. 



Builders and na 
engines. 




Baldwin & Co. : 

S.S.Po»t 

CVibbaid 

Geo. A. Parker 

Union 

General Dix 

Vulcan 

Blue Bird 

Hamming Bird 

Norria &, Son : 

KM. Stanton 

Borneo 

Fire Fly 

Manfrod 

May Queen 

Governor Nye 

Hiawatha 

Pickwick 

General Meiga 

Colonel Beckwith 

President 

William Mason: 

W.H.Whiton 

General Robinson 

General Sickles 

H.L. Robinson 

Clarke 

B.L.'Wents 

Taunton Locomotive Co. : 

General Meade 

General Conch 

Grape Shot 

Secretary 

New Jersey Locomotive 
Works: 

D. H. Rncker 

Chas.Minot 

Commodore 

General McClellau . . . . 

Col. D. C. MoCallum .. 

Zebra 

Tiger 

Lion 

Fred Leach 

J.H. Devereux 

Rogers Locomotive 
Works: 

Osceola 

Buffalo 

W.W.Wright 

U. S. Military &ilroads : 

Lieut. General Grant. 

General Sheridan 

Rapidan 

Jersey City Locomotive 
Works: General Geary. 
J. Souther: 

Hoosao 

Monitor 

Miscellaneous: 

Senator 

Sentinel 

Dover 

Contest 

Victor 

Vidette 



Romuuis.. 



51,900 
51,800 
61,300 

51,300 
58,000 



64,000 

54,000 
54,000 

56,000 
55,000 
40,000 
44,000 
50,000 
50,000 
50,000 
24,000 



I 



hirii^-g. i I 

lb X 22 $10,303.00 t22,000.00 
' •*' 11.845.00 22,000.00 
2,500.00 21,000.00 
0,500.00 21,000.00 
9,500.00 21,000.00 
0,250.00 I 20,000.00 
5,500.00, 6,000.00 
6,000.00' 6,000.00 



h\ ^ 24 

mt 24 

10 3( 24 
K>x24 
15 ^24 

V\\ 22 
Hx22 



16x22 
16x22 
16x22 
16x22 
15x22 
15x22 

16x22 
16x22 
16x22 
16x24 



16x24 
16x24 
16x24 
16x24 
16x24 
16x24 
16x24 
16x24 
16x24 
15x22 



15x22 
15x22 
16x22 

16x22 



16x20 
16x20 

15x24 
16x20 
15x20 
14x20 
16x20 
16x20 
15x20 
10x18 



9.500.00 
9,500.00 
8,900.00 
10,990.00 
10,900.00 
12,875.00 
10,990.00 
10,990.00 
12,875.00 
12,875.00 



22,000.00 
21,000.00 

I 20,000.00 

i 21,000.00 
21.000.00 

I 21,000.00 
21,000.00 

I 21.000.00 
21,000.00 
21,000.00 



0.800.00 21,000.00 

9,300.00 21,000.00 

11,845.00 22,000.00 

11,845.00 22,000.00 

21,000.00 

9,860.00 21,000.00 



12,876.00 
12,876.00 
10,969.00 



22,000.00 
22.000.00 
22,000.00 



9,000.00 20,000.00 



13,000.00 
18, 000. 00 
18,000.00 
10,500.00 
10,500.00 
11,845.00 
11,845.00 
12,491.00 
10,500.00 
8,660.00 

9,000.00 
11,830.00 
12,088.00 



8,760.00 

7,000.00 
7,000.00 

6,800.00 
5,300.00 
4,500.00 
4,750.00 
4.750.00 
9,000.00 
5,000.00 



22,000.00 
22.000.00 
22,000.00 
21,000.00 
21.000.00 
21,000.00 
21,000.00 
22,000.00 
21,000.00 
20.000.00 



20,000.00 
20.000.00 
21,000.00 

20,000.00 
22,000.00 
20,000.00 

20,000.00 

15,000.00 
15, 000. 00 

7,000.00 
5,000.00 
5,000.00 
5, 000. 00 
5,OU0.0O 
15,000.00 
8,000.00 
2,600.00 



I 



13.800.89 
4,818.78 
8,2S6w68 

11.467.80 
6,136.62 
8.518.21 
4,289.64 
6,664.21 

4.363.19 
4,271.20 
6,196.66 
3,828.66 
4,053.74 
4,550.73 
4.487.16 
4,820.16 
3, 650. 81 
8,826.68 
1,646.81 

4,881.80 
8,580.80 
8.944.92 
2,809.60 
4,870.64 
4, 44a 67 

4,002.52 
8,878.09 
2,807.92 
4. 07a 49 



3, 740. 19 
5.7IMI.29 
Z §4^ 17 
2.r*42.l3 

4. L1LP.L79 
i, y.'A. T9 
4,0^4,60 
3. tfK;^ 62 
4,U45.82 
5,885.88 



3,225.67 
3,209.63 
2.650.80 

3.613.30 
8,921.69 
4.483.10 

9,068.04 

6.709.88 
2,960.95 

5,484.62 
6,756.12 
2,976.59 



2,372.99 
126.50 



288,60L88 66I,M6 



I 



i 

a 
I 
I 

I 



6.597 
5,709 

11,064 
807 

16,766 
8,892 
4,611 
7,067 

6,884 
6,751 
9,129 
ia748 
8,733 
9.896 
7,010 
12,207 
18,665 
14.130 
2,780 



$57.61 
76.64 
20.88 
1,278.46 
86.60 
00.28 
08.00 
80.28 

88.88 

88.27 
66.91 
85.68 

48.42 
48.42 
56.02 

86.38 
10.68 
27.07 
60.02 



7,087 


61.88 


16.071 


68.89 


9.804 


40.23 


10,760 


96.85 


10,108 


48.18 


ia584 


48.15 


8,830 


58.50 


10,606 


86.68 


8,822 


88.47 


6.801 


71.68 


1,622 


244.74 


1,180 


6ia47 


4.705 


50.40 


12.442 


2o.a 


18,516 


23.24 


9,821 


46.42 


18,706 


83.50 


4,060 


08. U 


8,814 


68.10 


8.880 


86.79 


18,048 


24.73 


16,616 


18.97 


12,226 


21.68 


18,222 


2L72 


60 





6,019 I 

6,867 I 
I 
12.035 
7,414 

6,567 
3,897 
4,274 



6,579 



74.48 

154.67 

61.87 
39.53 

83.61 
178.36 
60.62 



86^07 



48.04 



UNION AUTHORITIES. 



81 



[Table No. 5.] 
U. S. MIUTART RAILROADS. 

Tons carried and miles run during fiscal year. 



Winobeater and 

PMnnac. 
aty Pafait and eon- 

BBottncroada. 
VnftSi. 

Total 



1 



Tons. 
88.541 
44.452 

10.806 

S8,606 



908,067 



Tont, 
118,078 
51.681 

168,662 

26,811 



884,672 



Tona. 

851 
760 

76,540 

864 



78.515 



1 
I 



Tont. 
64 
240 



61 



10,030 



TOHM. 

1,788 
5,084 

75.870 

2.858 



84.500 



Tont. 

13,830 

665 

21.570 

561 



36,6a 



Toiu. 
160. 161 
102.832 

580,812 

62.158 



868,458 



i 
5 



54,370 
22,664 

07.200 

6.517 



180.751 



e 

I 



666.507 
632,812 

2,322,800 



3.682.128 



[Tabla No. 6.] 
U. S. MILITARY RAILROADS. 

Number of passengers carried July /, 1864^ to June 30^ 



1866. 



Boad. 


Joly 


Ang. 


Sept. ! Oct. 1 KoT. 

1 1 


Deo. 


Al«iaiidria 


18.486 

35,870 

1.868 

2.646 


11.845 

46,150 

1.271 

8.158 


14.681 16.785 14.596 
43.440 , 66.766 63,451 
2,125 2.206 17.255 
4,647 1 8,741 | 8,963 


17,501 


CttyPolBt 


60.781 


Wiaebaatsr and Potomac 

V9tMk 


24.666 
4.767 






Total 


52.870 


62 424 


64.896 ' 89.496 | 99.265 


106,805 







Road. 


Jan. 


Feb. 


liarob. 


April. 


K.,. 


June. 

6,692 
87,865 

7,778 
2.784 


Total. 


Alexandria 


16,968 
57,841 
86.766 
8,968 


86.041 
66,645 
88, 6U 
8,673 


18,954 
64,845 
21.652 
4.861 


21,834 
97.467 
20,854 
8.289 


18,676 
2,671 


184, 116 


City Point 


785,981 


tfocfblk 


193.260 
44.117 






Total 


115,537 


184,203 


100,812 


142.894 


124,042 


105.219 


1, 207, 474 







[Table No. 7.] 
U. S. MILITARY RAILROADS. 

Receipts for freight and passengers during fiscal year ending June SO. 



Reoelpta. 


July. 


Ang. j Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. j Dec. 


Paawmmrn . 


189.10 
80.00 


951.70 
5.00 


$88.50 
866.00 


$260.40 
2,472.75 


$425.70 ! $2,237.45 
2.565.00 1 3.623.29 


Prnigbf 




Total 


119. 10 


56.70 1 iRi sn 


2.733.15 


2,990.70 1 5, 86a 74 









ReceJpta. 


Jan. 

$2,639.30 
3,830.60 


Feb. Hansb. April. | May. Jnno. i Total. 


T^—e iiiiifiiie . ■ . . , 


$8 917 40 p^ 33S an 


1 
$2,803.95 ,$12,181.06 $18,156.73 $45,186.50 
2,266.70 4,335.32 7.368.82 | 36.077.58 


pSSf?" 


3.184.00 


0,029.20 






Total 


6,460.90 


7.102.30 


8.364.50 


5.070.65 


16, 516. 38 25. 525. 55 . 81. 264. 17 

1 1 



6 R R — SERIES III, VOL V 



82 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. 

lTableNo.8.] 
U. S. MIUTARY RAILROADS. 

Amount of material received and used July 1, 1S64, to June SO, 1865, 



Month. 



July 

Aagoflt 

September. 

October 

Norember . 
December . 
JanoMy . . . 
Febmary . . 
March. 



On Hand. Reoeired. 



$371,479.50 



^.: 



Jane., 



w, 'rs.i. «7 

llfl, TSii. 39 
124, i-29 01 
34a 70fl. 10 
21&, 7T2. 71 
9<n, f^J^. m 
97, 441. » 
17<t,$]3.4;2 
4SG. ]5t ^ 
H.Ml 11 
» 1 



371,479.69 i 1,902,783.87 



Used. 



Ou Hand. 



$136,243.41 

77,244.93 
142,305.72 

63,038.64 

96,958.12 

80,722.27 
149,825.13 
122,932.82 
162,670.32 
454,427.86 

45,402.48 , 

53,049.36 I $687,267.40 



1,586,906.06 687.267.40 



(Table No. 9.) 
Estimated value of property on military railroads. State of Virginia, June SO, 1865, 



Description. 



Maohine^hops and additions 

Bngine-hooaes 

Car-shops and additions 

Depot baildinffs,&o 

Bridge shops, dec 

Store-honse buildings 

Offices 

goarters and dwelling-hooses 
ommissary bolldings 

Wharves and fixtures 

Bau*ge and switch-houses 

Water stations 

Locomotive engines 

Box-cars 

Flat-cars 

Stock cars 

Passenger-cars 

President's and wreck car 

Handcars 

Pile-drivers 

Stationary engines 

Pumping engines 

Printing department 

Commissary department 

Iron, railroad 

Iron and steel 

Chairs 

Spikes, railroad 

Machinery in machine department . 

Machinery in car department 

Material in machine and car depart- 
ment. 

Tools in machine department 

Tools in car department 

Office f^uniture 

Tools, Ac, in construction depart- 
ment. 

Lumber 

Miscellaneous property 

Store-bouse repiiNrt 



Total 2,175,277.15 



Alexandria 
railroads. 



$6,1^.00 

84,500.00 

28.950.00 

2,500.00 

1,800.00 

8,500.00 

2,350.00 

6,500.00 

8,500.00 

8.000.00 

400.00 

1,650.00 

602.300.00 

280,350.00 

159,800.00 

U, 700. 00 

16,450.00 

14,000.00 

625.00 

5,000.00 

5.900.00 

10,000.00 

1. 542. 00 

1,719.67 

107. 840. OU 

50, 300. 00 

(a> 

(a) 

24.048.00 

4,101.00 

8,895.60 

18,913.21 
3.471.43 
1,488.00 

23.090.84 

(a) 
27, 080. 00 
087,267.40 



Winchester 

and Citv Point ' Norfolk 

Potomac railroads. I railroads. 
RaUroad. 



$600.00 
1,200.00 
45.00 
1,139.00 
223.00 
180.00 
250.00 
611.00 
630.00 



106.00 

275.00 

68,000.00 

51,450.00 



12,600.00 
16,450.00 



250.00 



2,500.00 
2,500.00 



076.00 

1.280.00 

5,325.00 

24.48 

21.00 

2,450.00 

465.00 

7,415.00 

8,243.00 

1,761.05 

187.50 

3.621.00 

1,960.00 
5,321.00 



193,059.98 



$2,500.00 

8, 100. 00 

2.650.00 

811.28 

1,250.00 

866.00 

900.00 ' 

14,689.05 

450.00 I 
14,820.U0 , 
220.00 I 
660.00 
125.000.00 ' 
44, 100. 00 , 
27,200.00 
1.800.00 
11,750.00 



$8,000.00 
29. 000. 00 
4,000.00 
1.560.00 
650.00 
150.00 



2,070.00 



430.00 
84,000.00 
17,850.00 
23,800.00 



250.00 
2 500.00 
3,000.00 
7.600.00 



1.807 68 
352.920.00 



5,79&40 
8.712.00 
9. 795. 00 
153.00 
5,310.00 

4, 760. 00 
895.00 
222.00 

5,676.00 

20,997.23 
4,176.00 I 



2,350.00 



625.00 



2,600.00 
2,100.00 



476 00 
12. 480 00 
9. 375. 00 
15.36 
27.00 
13,725.00 
2,175.00 
25, 310. 00 

2,142.00 

1,761.00 

452.00 

1,851.60 

4.083.00 i 
11,571.00 



I 



Total. 



$17,250.00 

67,800.00 

35,645.00 

6,010.28 

8.923.00 

4,606.00 

8,500.00 

23,870.05 

4,580.00 

22.820.00 

726.00 

2.915.00 

879.300.00 

393. 750. 00 

210. 800. 00 

26.100.00 

47.UOO.00 

14 000.00 

1,750.00 

7,500.00 

14,000.00 

22.100.00 

1.542.00 

4, 079. 35 

475, 520. 00 

74, 000. 00 

5.838.24 

8. 760 90 

50, 013. 00 

6.894.00 

46,030.60 

29.058.21 
7.888.48 
2.849.50 

34,839.41 

27, 04a S3 

48,148.00 

687,267.40 



688,138.64 



264,628.96 1 3,321.104.68 



a Store-honse sheet. 



UKION AUTHORITIES. 83 

[Table No. 10.] 
U. B. MIUTARY RAILROADS. 

Oradients, alignments , elevations^ <ftc.* 

[Table No. 11.] 

MILITARY RAILROADB OF VIRGINIA. 

Track laid from July 1, 1864^ to June 30^ 1865, 
Army Line : Milaa. Feet. 

Main Udo from Pifkin Station to Humphreys Station 18 8,100 

Sidings, from Pitkin Station to Hnmphreys Station 2 4,705 

Qr^x Branch, from Hancock Station to Crawford Station 2 1,200 

^Tdings, from Hancock Station to Crawford Station 2, 960 

Patrick Branch, from Warren Station to Patrick Station 2 1,000 

Sidings, from Warren Station to Patrick Station 1,550 

Total length of track in main line, branches, and sidings 21 3, 955 

Sonth Side Bailroad, from City Point to Borkeville: 

Main line relaid 10 820 

Hospital, bakery, and other sidings 4 2,800 

Total 14 8,120 

Petersburg and Richmond Railroad: 

Siding laid at Manchester 1,520 

Richmond and Danville Railroad: 

Main line, near Appomattox bridge 2,000 

Siding at Manchester, storage of cars 2 2,430 

Total 2 4,430 

Seaboard and Roanoke Railroad: 

Main line, fifteen miles from Portsmouth .5,210 

Alexandria and Washington Railroad: 

Across Long Bridge and approaches 1 200 

Alexandria, Londonn and Hampshire Railroad: 

Siding at Arlington Mills 800 

Orange and Alexandrii| Railroad: 

First siding sonth of Alexandria 1,620 

Main track on Accotink bridge 140 

Track over Pope's Head bridges Nos. 1,2, 8, 4, and 5 580 

Track over Bnll Rnn bridge 150 

Track over Broad Run bridge 240 

Track over Kettle Run bridge 80 

Track over Cedar Rnn bridge 175 

Total 2,985 

Manassas Gkip Railroad : 

Main line near Piedmont 8,980 

Sidings at Piedmont 1,990 

Sidings at Salem 770 

Sidings at Rectortown 800 

Total 1 1,760 

Baltimore and Ohio Railroad : 

Siding at Bladensborg 1,850 

Point Lookout, Md.: 

Siding and tracks for quartermaster 840 

♦Omitted. 



84 



CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. 



Winchester and Potomac Railroad : MU««' *"••*- 

Main track, from Harper*s Ferry to Stephenfion^s 28 400 

Sidings, from Harper*8 Ferry to Stephenson's 2 4,640 

Total 80 6,040 

Total track laid during the year 74 140 

[Table No. 12.] 
MILITARY RAILROADS OF VIRQINIA. 

Trestle bridges built during year ending June SO. 



Height. 




Armv Line : 

Pitkin SUtion to Humphreys Station . 

Patrick Branch 

Oregg Branch 



Total length 

8oath8ide Railroad: 

City Point to Burkeville 

Petersburg and Richmond Railroad : 

Connection at Petersburg 

Richmond and Danville Railroad : 

Manchester to Danville 

Seaboard and Roanoke Railroad : 

Sixteen miles from Portsmonth 

Winchester and Potomac Railroad : 

Total length 

Alexandria and Washington Railroad : 

Approaches to new Cong Bridge 

Orange and Alexandria and Manassas Gap Railroads : 

Total length 



Total trestle-work bnilt daring the year 13,0 

Average , 



31 



[July 1, 1865.] 
Bvt. Brig. Gen. D. C. McCallum, 

General Manager U. S. Military Railroads: 

General: As general superintendent of military railroads, Divis- 
ion of the Tennessee, I have the honor to submit the following 
report: 

I succeeded Maj. E. L. Wentz as general superintendent military 
railroads, Military Division of the Mississippi in May, 1865. He 
succeeded A. Anderson in the same position in November, 1864; so 
that I am the third general superintendent who has had charge of 
operations in this department during the fiscal year ending June 30, 
1865. Not having access to all the annals of my predecessors in 
office, I shall find it almost impossible to make a report as minute and 
complete as is desirable. 



UNION AUTUOBlTlli8. 



85 



1, 2, 3. On the Ist day of July, 1864, the length of railroads then 
ill operation which came afterward under my direction was as follows: 



TU1» of ndlriMd- 



NMlnrUto and Chat- 
lfuliTlE*aBd Deca- 



VMhvllIe and North 

westom. 
KaahTilla and Ken- 

lock J • 
Wcotrern and Atlan- 

tto. 
KiBgaton Braaoh . 

East Tonnoasee and 

Dafton Bianeh . . 




Now naed aa IT. S. mllituj 
railroad line*. 



NaahvOto and Chat- 
tanooga K. B. Co. 

TenoeaMO and Ala- 
bama R. U. Co.: 
Central Sonthem 
R. B.Co.: Teunee- 



Central R. R. Co. 

NaahriUe and North 
«rMtem R,R.Cu. 

Edgefield and Ken- 
tucky R. R. Co. 

Sute of Georgia 



.do. 



Terminal statione. 



EmITc 

Virginia. I 

RogersTiile Branch 

UemphtsandCharlee- 1 



East Tenneaaee and 

Georgia R. R. Co. 
do.. 

Baat Tenoeaeee and 

Virginia R. R. Co. 

....do..... 

Memphis and Charles- 
ton R. R. Co. 



noogft. 
NaMhville-Decatar.' 



NaehTlUe>.Hiok- 

man. Ky. 
NMbtrille~8 1 n t e 

Line. 
Chattanooga, Tenn.- 

Atlanta,On. 
Kingeton.Oa.— 
Rome. Oa. 
I Chattanooga,Tenn.~ 
I KnoxTlue. 
Clereland, Tenn.— 

Dalton. Qa. 
KnozTllle, Tena — 

BristoirVa. 
Junction — Rogers- 

▼ille. 
Meraphia, Tenn — 

Stevf 



The whole road. 
do 



\MUn, 
151 



190 



NaahriUe-^ ohn- 
sonTiUe. 
47 NaahvUle>'Clarks- 

▼ille. 
198 CbnttMiooga,Teoa.- 

Big Shanty, Qa. 
17 I Kingston, Ga.— 
Rmne.Ga. 



112 
27 

130 
15 

271 



Chattanoogn, Tenn. 

KnosTille. I 

Cleraland, Tenn.— 

Dalton. Oft. 
Not in I 



78 

61 
107 

17 
112 

27 




During July and August, 1864, the advance of General Sherman's 
army gave us the remainder of the Western and Atlantic Railroad 
from Big Shanty, 107 miles from Chattanooga, to Atlanta, 138 miles 
from Chattanooga, to which place we ran early in September, 1864. 
Some of the roads in use at the beginning of the fiscal year were 
abandoned as they became useless for military operations, and others 
from time to time added, until the end of the year, June 30, 1865, 
found us in possession and operating the following roads, viz: 





Prior 




lo the war. 




Now nsed as IT. S. m 
railroad lines. 


ilitary 


Title of railroad. 




f 




1 




Original ownera. 


Terminal atatioua. 










MiUt. 




JfClM. 


Kathfille nnd Chat- 


NaahriUe and Chat 


NaahTiUe-Chatta- 


151 


The whole road 


151 


HaahTilie nnd Deca 


tanooga B. R. C4>. 
Tenneaaee and Ala- 


nooga. 
Naahvill»-Decatnr. 


120 


do 


190 


tnr. 


bama R. R. Co.; 












Central Southern 




1 






R. R. Co. ; Tennea- 










aea and Alabama 




i 






Central R. R. Co. 










NaabTille and North 


Naahrille and North- 


Naahrille-. Hi ok. 




Naahrilto^John- 


n 


weatem 


western R. R. Co. 


man. Ky. 




sonrilla. 




Naahville and Ken- 


Bdgefleld and Ken- NaahTilie-Sute 


47 


Naahrille -Spring- 


28 


tucky. 


tacky R. R. Co. | Line. 


t field. 




Western and Allan 


Stat** of Georgia Chattanooga — A t - 


138 


Chattanooga— A t- 


138 


IH. 


lanta. Ga. 




lanu. 




Kingston Branch . 


' do 


Kingston-Rome, 
Ga. 


17 


Kingaion— Rome... 


17 


' 





86 CORRESPONDENCE, KTC. 



!>_{-, *_ __, Now used as U. 8. militju-y 

Prior to w«r. | railroad liDe.. 



Title of railroad. 



Original owners. Terminal statiouR. ^ ■ Terminal atationa. 



Baat Tennessee and ' East Tennessee and Chattanooga- Knox- 112 1 Cliattanooga— Knos- 

Goorgia. Georgia R. R. Co. ville. ville. 

DftlUm Branch do Cleveland—Dalton, 27 I Cleveland— Dalton.. 

I G»- . ' 

! iCut. TAnn«MM AnH Kooxville— Bristol . . 130 . Knoxrille— Carter's 



Station. 



MUes. 

112 



27 

110 



East Tennessee and East Tennessee and 
Virginia. | Virginia R. R. Co. 
Ri^FBTiUe Branch do 

Memphis and Charles- Memphis and Charles- ' McmphiH —Steven- 271 Decatur— Stevenson 81 
ton. ton R. R. Co. 



Junction — Rogers- l") Junction — Rogers- 15 

ville. ville. ! 



As a general summary of this item of report it will be sufficient to 
say that there were in use July 1, 1864, 754 miles of road, and at the 
end of the fiscal year 877 miles, showing a gain of 123 miles during 
the year. 

4. To meet the demand for the increased necessities of the anny of 
Greneral Sherman and supply the parts depending npon the military 
railroads for supplies, and to fcirward the great accession of troops in 
this department and transport to the rear the sick and wounded, and 
near the close of the fiscal year to transjwrt the immense army back 
on their way to points of muster out, and send the refugees who 
during the winter had been dispatched to the rear again over our 
roads to their former homes, we have purchased from manufacturers 
sixty-two new engines and captured from the enemy three, adding 
thus sixty-five efficient engines to the numl>er in use at the close of 
the last fiscal year. 

SUMMARY. 

Locomotives reported June 30, 1864 loO 

Purchased during the fiscal year 62 

Captured from the enemy 3 

Total June 30, 1865 215 

5. There were purchjised during the same period 080 lx>x-cars and 
397 flat-cars, thus adding 1,380 freight-cars to those in use June 30, 
1864. 

SUMMARY. 

Freight-cars reported June 30. 1864 l,4r)2 

Added during fiscal year 1 , 3S6 

Total 2,8;38 

6. I submit heix^with the reiK^rt of th(» auditor,* showing that the 
average number of men employed in the entire department during 
the fiscal year was 13,043, at an average exiKMise of 8770,044.85 per 
month, making the total expense for emploves in the entire depart- 
ment $0,355,738.21. 

7. The report of the auditor of all accounts audited and prepared 
for payment during each month of the fiscal year is herewith sub- 
mitted': Average amount, $040,734.05; total, $11,288,819.78. 

• Omitte*!. 



UNION AUTHORITIES. 



87 



Stores and troops were transported from Nashville at the following 
rate per month : 



Mootb. 



July 

Aaciui 

Septamber. 
October.... 
Not ember . 



Jeouary. 
Febnurr. 
March. 



^. 



Care, 
atoree. 



8,208 
8,186 
2,808 
8,806 
1,871 
880 
2,420 
2,415 
2,180 
2,830 
1,035 



Care, Care, Total I 
troopa. ' empty, care. | 



Storea. 



Jn»e ' 2,877 | 



325 
144 I 
588 

1.240 , 
137 1 
346 • 
300, 
588 I 
330 
406 I 



288 

1,061 

1,800 

1,307 

783 

470 

854 

106 

738 

1,020 

244 



I 



3,608 

3,773 

3,023 

5,080 I 

4.227 j 

1,280 ! 

3,245 

3,688 

2,052 

8,707 

3,361 

8,807 



Total 20.056' 5,878 I 8,882'43,411 



Torn. 
25,884 
25,828 
21,584 
20,864 
13.868 
2.880 
10,860 
10.320 
17.852 
21,112 
15.480 
21,416 



Number 
of troope. 



18,000 
10,100 
10,207 
81,150 
85,450 
8,850 
17,800 
10,060 
24.400 
18.500 
20.300 
34,410 



232,448 1 283, n6 



The foregoing is the business ordered by Capt. S. B. Brown, and 
embraces nothing of the large business done by the Quartermaster's 
Department in Chattanooga, Huntsville, Knoxville, and Atlanta, 
sending the army over portions of our road and finally dispatching 
it back to Nashville when mustered out of service. 

Daring the fiscal year the following monthly report will show the 
actual number of cars moyed upon the roads centering in Nashville: 



MoDtb. 



July 

Aufoet ... 
September 
October... 
November. 
December. 
Jaonary .. 



1864 
1864 
1664 
1861 
1864 
J864 
1865 



4,618 
4,781 ; 
4.384 
6,225 
4,764 • 
1.754 
4,571 I 



I 



1 



4.403 I 0,111 

4,744 I 0.525 

4,058 

6,031 

5.580 

1,622 

4,271 



8,442 
12,256 
10.833 I 
8,376 I 
8,842 l' 



Month. 



Febmary . 
liarch .... 

April 

May 

Jane 



Total. 



1865 

1865 
1865 
J8S6 
1865 



I 

t 



I I 



4,710 
8,000 
5,110 
4.118 
4,437 



.! 53,457 



4.718 
4,840 I 
6.381 I 

4.584 
4.703 



I 



0,428 
8,338 
10,441 
8,007 
0.280 



54.563 108,020 



Making a total of 108,020 cars actually forwarded and received at 
this station. The order of General Sherman of April 10, 1864, stop- 
ping all travel on private account over military roads was in fuU 
force until December, 1864. 

In December, 1864, and again in March, 1865, these orders were so 
far modified as to allow passengers and freight to be carried when not 
interfering with the business of the Government. The receipts from 
the express company, private freights, and passengers during the 
fiscal year are as follows, viz: 



MfiDth. 



S.?i^" Froigbt. I Paewneere. 



1864. ) 

1 

Jnly ! 017,880.22 

Aofnet ; 11,756.52 

September 7,381.44 

Octobv 7,57a 06 

Xerember 7,075.53 

December 8,246.64 



82,062.11 

235.60 

2,800.00 

6,041.80 



ToUl. 



$17,880.32 
13,818.88 

7.617.04 
10,378.06 
14,017.38 

8,246.64 



88 



CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. 




1805. 



January . . 
Febmary . 
March.... 

April 

nSiy 

Jun« 



$16,748.98 
25,278.30 
17,604.09 
17,373.99 
17,228.04 
27,675.41 



$4,970.34 
570. 16 
09.65 
9,885.33 
15,792.88 
27,321.96 



$4,719.40 
25,250.50 
18.042.75 
20.231.00 
44.146.65 
56. 150. 67 



$26,138.72 
51,098.95 
35.746.49 
47,490.32 
77, 167. 57 

111,14B.04 



Total. 



177,236.22 69,479.82 . 168.540.97 ; 415,257.01 



CARE OF ROAD. 



The repairs of the 877 miles of road was continued from last year. 
The Nashville and Chattanooga line has been made new for its whole 
length — cross-ties and T-iron substituted for the U-iron and string- 
ers — so that from one of the worst and least available it has become 
one of the best under my control. Large additions have been made 
to the yard at Nashville, at Decherd, and Stevenson. Side-tracks to 
lumber yard, Government saw-mills, &c., have rendered the work of 
keeping all the different departments of the railroad service in efficient 
operation much easier. To complete and keep in repair the track 
upon this long line of road there has been purchased 777,879 cross-ties, 
104,100 feet switch timber, and 38^ sets switch ties, the total cost of 
which, delivered upon the lines of road where needed, has been 
$414,727.15. During the year the number of tons of new iron has 
been 7,833.3. This has been distributed as follows: 

Tons. 

Upon the Nashville and Chattanooga line 3,922.9 

Tennessee and Alabama line 445. 9 

Edgefield and Kentucky line 113.4 

Nashville and Northwestern . 25. 8 

Memphis and Charleston - 67. 8 

Yard, Nashville and Decherd 28. 7 

Shipped to Captain Starkweather, assistant quartermaster, for use below 

Cnattanooga 1,674.7 

Shipped to W. W. Wright 1,484.7 

Shipped to Captain Parks, Memphis - 71 . 4 



Total 



7.833.3 



CARE OF BRIDGES. 

On the Nfishville and Decatur Railroad line 8,000 feet of trestle 
bridges have been constructed during the year. With the exception 
of the high trestle-work in Nashville, the high watera of 1864 carried 
out all the bridges once, and many of them twice; while in Hood's 
movements upon Nashville in December, 18C4, they were destroyed 
by fire the same number of times. In addition to this temporary 
rebuilding of these bridges with trestle-work, 2,145 feet of bridges 
upon this line have l>een permanently built by contractors— Post, 
Skidmore & Co. and Boomer & Co. — with Howe's truss and McCallum 
bridges. 

XASHVILLE AND CHATTANOOGA. 



On the Nashville and Chattanooga Railroad line 4,250 feet of bridges 
have been built in a temporary manner, }'et intended to be permanent. 



UNION AUTHORITIKS. 



89 



In September, 1864, Wheeler destroyed by fire bridge No. 7, 300 feet 
long. In December, in Hood's raid, bridges Nos. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 12 
were destroyed by fire, and these have been permanently rebuilt. By 
high water and the enemy the bridges named have been destroyed, 
some twice and some three times, and as often rebuilt. 

WATER-TANKS. 

On the Nashville and Decatur line nine water-tanks were con- 
stmcted complete. On the Nashville and Chattanooga line forty-five 
water-tanks were constructed. There has been laid nearly five miles 
of new water pipe to make the water stations complete. The exact 
figures are 24,660 feet. On the Chattanooga and Knoxville, Chatta- 
nooga and Atlanta, and Knoxville and Bristol lines twenty-five new 
and complete water stations have been built, and nine of these are 
fitted with water wheels, which render them self-acting and complete 
in every respect. On the Nashville and Chattanooga line near 115 
miles of main line and side-tracks have been relaid with new ties, new 
iron, and ballast. 

CONSTRUCTION OF BUILDINGS. 

The large machine, pattern, and repair shops alluded to in the last 
yearly report and the roundhouse for the large number of engines 
then projected have been completed during the year. R. H. Nagle, 
master carpenter, has built two machine-shops. 



Kind of bolldingt. 



Length. 


Width. 


Feet. 


Feet. 


196 


88 


80 


66 


100 


48 


450 


6S 


an 


b86 


200 


40 


05 


40 


60 


n 


160 


36 


175 


86 


705 


201 


72 


40 


66 


20 


M 


26 


88 


18 


46 


86 



Height. 



KiohliiB iihiip 

....do :. 

Pslteim shop....... 

Blookamith and boiler shop . 

Bonndhoaee 

Cvpeofeer shop 

Tin shop 

Copper shop 



Hospital bnildiiigs 

'^ ' niissler'somoe.... 

foraoditor 

Ofltoe master maohinist. . 
Ofltoe master oarponter. . 
U. S. prlntiDg iflloe 



2 stories. 
Do. 
Do. 

1 story. 

Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

2 stories. 

Do. 
8 stories. 

1 story. 

2 atories. 



aStslls. 



bhaag' 



In addition to these buildings, sixty-nine mess-houses, fitted with 
bunks, benches, and tables for the comfoi*t of the men employed, were 
erected. In addition to the various platforms along the line of the 
Nashville and Northwestern Railroad, and at Nashville, for the con- 
venient loading of freight and troops and animals, there were built 
at Decherd one roundhouse with twelve stalls 60 feet long; one black- 
smith shop 60 by 30 feet; one car shop 66 by 35 feet, besides fifteen 
buildings used as mess-houses, offices, and depot buildings, varying 
from 20 by 40 to 20 by 80 feet. In addition to these buildings all the 
desks, cases, Ac, needed by all the officers of the military railroads 
were constructed by this department. To complete this work there 



90 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. 

were ased 4,216,203 feet of lamber; 1,312 kegs of nails; 1,442 locks, 
with the hinges, screws, 4^c., to make the work complete. In addi- 
tion to the. above work the carpenter force under Mr. Nagle has 
assisted in all emergencies in rebuilding bridges, getting out bridge 
and block-house timbers, A;c., building 4,500 feet of bridges on the 
various lines, and hewing and preparing in the woods 1,000,519 feet 
of square timber suitable for bridges and buildings. The construc- 
tion of these buildings for offices and mess-houses and accommoda- 
tions for the men employed upon the railroad work was rendered 
indispensable by the impossibility of procuring any accommodations 
at all for the large number of men thus brought together in Nashville 
in the Government service. In the last annual report it was stated 
that until February, 1864, no provisions had been made for the repairs 
of cars. This department had to be created. Under the thorough and 
efficient supervision of George Herrick the necessary buildings were 
beg^n and completed which has rendered this one of the most perfect 
establishments in the country. The buildings so completed during 
the fiscal year are one car shop, 202 by 77 and 23 high, with skylights 
above the square throughout its whole length; one machine and 
blacksmith shop, 126 by 47 and 23 high, vrith skylights and blinds 
through its whole length. There is a wing to this shop 55 by 35 and 
17 high with ventilator and boiler room att.ached, 35 by 18; one paint 
shop, 112 by 47 and 23 high, with skylights similar to those before men- 
tioned; one brick dry-house, 40 by 15 and 17 high, which has been 
partially rebuilt a second time; one coal house, 20 by 35 and 8 high; 
one iron store-house, 14 by 20 and 16 high; one house for oil, waste, 
and tools, 18 by 40 and 8 high; one building, 20 by 50, for storage of 
coke and sand; eight mess-houses, fitted with bunks and all complete 
for the men, have also been erected. This, as before stated, was 
indispensable, as no accommodations could possibly be secun^ for 
the men. The necessary masonry, grading, and ballasting the 
grounds, yards, and track, through the repair-shop grounds, has been 
a large but necessary part of the work of preparing these shops for 
efficient service. 

At Decatur Junction houses and shops were erected suitable to work 
100 men. During Hood's raid upon the city in December, 1864, these 
were all nearly destroyed by our own forces, and had to be replaced 
by this department. At Johnsonville provision was made for shops, 
mess-houses, Ac. , to work twenty-five to forty men. At Taylor depot, 
en Broad street, accommodations were provided to work twenty-five 
to fifty men. The shops at Chattanooga have been made efficient, an 
engine house erected, and other necessary improvements made. The 
same has been done at Knoxville and Stevenson. In the machine 
shop at Nashville 916 men have been employed on the average monthly 
during the fiscal year. During that year 5,571 orders have been filled 
for light repairs on engines, involving many hours' work of skillful 
mechanics. Fifty-four engines were received in the shop for general 
repairs; three engines were completed that were being rebuilt. Ten 
thousand six hundred and ten days of common labor were performed 
in the shops and yards; 4,035 days of machinist's labor were performed 
upon shops, tools, &c. ; 1,914 on track and bridge repairs; 369 on setting 
up new engines, while 620 days of common labor was employed during 
the same time upon setting up new engines. In December 979 men 
worked twelve days upon the fortifications, while the city was threat- 
ened by Geneml Hood. During the fiscal year the shops in Nashville 
have been entirely built. Two powerful engines, with all the shaft- 



UNION AUTHORITIES. 91 

ing necessary to drive the tools used, have been set np. Boom to 
hoose twenty-seven engines for repairs, erecting shop large enough to 
rebuild twenty engines, room to house forty-five engines, with pattern 
shops, blacksmith shops, carpenter shops, and offices in proportion — 
all these have been made new and complete in every respect. The 
grading of the yards and assistance in erecting these structures has 
been done by the common laborers in the num&rs above enumerated. 

CAR REPAIRS. 

The work accomplished in the car repair department has been large 
and thorough. Mr. Herrick perfected a wrecking car which enabled 
him to clear and pick up a wrecked train very speedily. This train 
has picked up 530 wrecked freight-cars and 16 wrecked engines since 
January 1, 1865, and brought them to Nashville for repairs. During 
the remainder of the fiscal year nearly as many more were also saved. 
During the same period this train has picked up and brought in from 
trains destroyed by fire, 294 car-loads of wheels, axles, bridge irons 
and railroad iron along the lines of road centering in Nashville. 
Most of these wrecks were caused by guerrillas placing obstructions 
upon the track or displacing rails. The car department has worked 
an average force of nearly 800 men x>cr month during the year. This 
force, in addition to the buildings erected and completed during the 
fiscal year before described, have repaired and rebuilt during the last 
six months of the year at Nashville, Chattanooga, Huntsville, Steven- 
son, Johnsonville, and Clarksville, 13,429 cars, and during the first six 
months more than half as many more, making a total of 20,000 cars 
rexMiired, rebuilt, and fitted for hospital and troop cars during the 
year. The amount of material cast in the iron and brass foundry 
during the last six months of the year was 1,053,945 pounds iron 
castings, 46,139 pounds brass castings, making an average -per month 
of 175,000 pounds of iron and 7,500 pounds of brass castings. This 
is too large an average for the whole fiscal year, though it is believed 
that 225,000 pounds of iron and 10,000. pounds of brass castings per 
month will not be too large. It is impossible to condense and specify 
the amount of work done upon the long lines of roads centering in 
Nashville so as to show what has actually been done. The emlargen- 
cies of military service have often allowed no time for proper orders 
of transportation of troops, stores, refugees, prisoners, &c., to be 
issued, so that many hundred trains have been run and many thou- 
sands of troops and refugees carried for which we have no credit. 
The work has been done in the midst of war, running through a coun- 
try filled with enemies, so that the ordinary risks of railroad man- 
agement have been enormously increased and the expenses largely 
extended. But in the midst of all this danger the coolness, bravery, 
and daring of the men in every department, from the highest official 
to the humblest laborers, have been worthy of praise. At the close of 
this fiscal year it gives me great pleasure to state that throughout 
the whole length of the lines of military railroads controlled and oper- 
ated by me there is every facility to i)erf orm well and efficiently every 
duty that may be required. The roads are in first-i*ate order, the 
bridges for the most part are permanent structures of the best 
description, and the water stations in perfect order. The amount of 
rolling-stock is sufficient for all work required, and in good order. 
The machine-shops and repair-shops are as complete as could be 
desired. 



92 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. 

I cannot close this imperfect and desultory report without express- 
ing my obligations to the following gentlemen for the zeal, fidelity, 
and intelligence with which they have co-operated with me on all 
occasions in their departments of duty: J. B. Van Dvne, assistant 
superintendent; George H. Hudson, superintendent; A. W. Dicker- 
son, W. R. Gifford, A. J. Cheeney, W. W. Tuttle and A. Watts, in the 
freight department; Col. John C. Meginnis, general engineer district; 
Stephen Hobbs, engine dispatcher; J. W. Wallace, engine dispatcher; 
John Trenbath, auditor; GeorgeHerrick, superintendent car repairs; 
R. H. Nagle, master carpenter; H. Elliott, master machinist; Messrs. 
Hebard, Nash, Lyman, Caryl, Craig, Gardiner, Jones, Kingsley, and 
Jenkins, in the road repair and bridge repairs. With F. J. Crilly, 
the efficient and gentlemanly chief quartermaster of military rail- 
roads, my relations have been most pleasant, while the co-opera- 
tion of Major-General Thomas, General Donaldson, and Capt. S. B. 
Brown has been always harmonious with the railroad authorities. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

W. J. STEVENS, 
SuperirUendenty &c. 



General Orders, | War Dept., Adjt. General^s Office, 

No. 122. { Washington, Jviy 8, 1865, 

regimental officers of volunteers on detached service to 
join their proper commands. 

I. With the exceptions hereinafter enumerated, the following is 
ordered: 

1. All commissioned officers of volunteers, for both white and col- 
ored regiments or independent* companies, now absent on detached 
service from their commands and not on duty within their proper 
armies or departments, will proceed forthwith to join their respective 
regiments and companies. 

2. Hereafter no commissioned regimental officer of volunteers will 
be placed on duty or transferred thereon out of the army or depart- 
ment in which his regiment may be serving. 

The exceptions authorized under the foregoing are as follows: 

1. Officers on duty mustering out and discharging the volunteer 
forces. 

2. Aides-de-camp to general officers on duty commanding troops. 

3. Officers on courts-martial or military commissions and those on 
duty in the Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands 
under direct orders from the War Department, Adjutant-General's 
Office. 

n. All enlisted men absent on detached service from their regi- 
ments or companies and outside the armies or departments in which 
the same may be serving will at once be sent to join their respective 
commands, unless they are absent therefrom by orders from the head- 
quarters of a milit^iry division or superior authority. 

III. Commanding generals of departments and armies are charged 
with the prompt execution of this order, and upon its provisions being 
fully complied with will report the fact to the Adjutant-Greneral of 
the Army. 



UNION AUTHORITIBS. 93 

IV. No ct'iomissioiied ofQcer or enlisted man absent in violation of 
this order nv'l be paid outside of the army or department in which his 
regiment or company may be serving. 
By order of the Secretary of War: 

E. D. TOWNSEND, 
Assistant AdjiUant-Qeneral, 



Circular) War Dept., Adjutant-General's Office, 

No. 31. ) WashingUm, Jvly 8, 1866. 

ORDERS AND INSTRUCTIONS RELATIVE TO THE MUSTER OUT OF CER- 
TAIN VOLUNTEER WHITE TROOPS. 

Veterans in the Army of the Tennessee, and Provisional Corps, 
Army of the Potomac, and, thereafter, all remaining volunteers 
in the said commands. 

War Department, Adjutant-General'^ Office, 

Washington, July 1, 1866. 
Maj. Oen. John A. Logan. U. S. Volanteers, 

Commanding Army of the Tenneuet^ IxntisviUe, Ky.: 
The Secretary of War directs that the remaining veteran re^ments of your 
command be mastered ont tinder the same conditions and regulations as the 15.000 
men ordered discharged by the telegraphic instmctions from this office of the 
22d instant. (See circular No. 28, current series. ) 

Please acknowledge receipt of this and forward without delay a list of the 
additional regiments, giving therein, for each, the strength, present and absrat, 
respectively. 

THOMAS M. VINCENT, 

Assistant Adiutant-Qeneral. 

CiBCULAR.l War Department, Adjutant-Qeneral^s Office, 

Washington, Jvly i, 1866. 
Xaj. Gen. H. G. Wright, 

Commanding Provisional Corps, Army of the Potomac : 
The Secretary of War directs that all veteran regiments of your command be 
mustered out of service. The muster out will be by entire organizations, includ- 
ing all additions by recruits and from other sources. The musters out, dis- 
charges, and payments will be made under the regrulations promulgated in 
Gtooeral Orders, No. 94, current series, from this office. 

PleBse acknowledge receipt of this and forward without delay a list of the 
regiments, giving therein, for each, the strength, present and absent, respectively. 

THOMAS M. VINCENT, 

Assistant Adjutant-Oeneral, 

Telegram.] Headquarters Armies of the United States, 

Washinaton, July 6, 1866. 
Kajor-Cteneral Looan, 

Louisville, Ky.: 
Under the last order >ou may muster out of service all that remains of the 
Army of the Tennessee remaining under your command. 

U. S. GRANT, 

Lieutenant'Oeneral. 

War Department, Adjutant-General's Office, 

Washington, July 7, 1866. 
Maj. Gen. John A. Logan, 

Commanding Army of the Tennessee, Louisville, Ky.: 
In discharging the remainder of your army, as directed by the telegraphic 
orders of yesteraav from Lieutenant-General Grant, the musters out, discharges, 
and payments will be made under the regulations promulgated in General 
Orders, No. 94, current series, from this office. 



94 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. 

Please forward to this office without delay a list of the regiments and inde- 
pendent companies to be discharged nnder the order, giving therein, for each, the 
strength, present and absent, respectively. So soon as the list is completed inform 
me by telegraph of the number, present and absent, for the respective States. 
Please acknowledge receipt of this. 
By order of the Secretary of War : 

THOMAS M. VINCENT, 

Assistant Adf^utant-OenerdL 

War Department, Adjutant-General's Office, 

WcLshington, July 7, 1S6S. 
Maj. Gen. H. G. Wright, U. S. Volunteers, 

Commanding Provisional Corps: 
General: The Secretary of War directs that all the remaining volunteer trooi» 
of your command be mustered out of service. The musters out, dischai^^es, and 

Siyments will be made under the regulations promulgated in General Orders, No. 
^current series, from this office. 

Please acknowled^ the receipt of this and forward without delay a list of 
the organizations, giving therein, for each, the strength, present and absent, 
respectively. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

THOBIAS M. VINCENT, 

Assistant Adf^utant-Oeneral. 

Memoranda.— See G^eneral Orders, No. 116, of June 17, for the discharge of 
certain enlisted men of the Veteran Reserve Corps. 

E. D. TOWNSEND, 
Assistant A^tUant- General. 



Washington, July 17, 1865, 
Maj. Gen. George G. Meade, 

Eighteenth and Delancy Place: 
Send staff officers to each, Virginia, North Carolina, and South Caro- 
lina, and direct the muster out of all cavalry that can be dispensed 
with, and the sale of their horses when dismounted. When it is nec- 
essary to retain cavalry for want of other troops, dismount them and 
have their horses sold, except the actual number of mounted men 
required. A few hundred mounted men in each State I would think 
the greatest abundance. Order also the muster out of all cavalry 
possible to dispense with in the other departments of your command. 
The horses to be turned over to quartermasters and reported to the 
Quartermaster-General. Request department commanders to report 
the number of men and horses disposed of under this order. 

U. S. GRANT, 

Lieutenant- General. 



Circular) War Dept., Adjutant-General's Office, 

No. 33. ) Washington, July 18, 1866. 

regulations under which officers of mustered-out regi- 
ments CAN receive final PAYMENTS. 

(Extracts from t«Iegram« nod clrculftm to chief niOBterlng oflloen of States.) 

I. Officers of mnstered-oat regiments can he paid on the certificate of the 
mustering officer that they have rendered all required returns and accounts, and 
on their affidavits that they are not indebted to the Government. 



UMION AUTHORITIES 96 

In the abaence of other evidence (certificates or statements from the supply 
departments concerned, retained papers, &c.) relative to the rendition of the 
said papers, the War Department has anthorized the affidavit of the mustered- 
out officer concerned to oe received as evidence, and mustering officers can base 
thereon their certificates relative to the rendition of returns and accounts. 

n. Mustering officers are not required to examine accounts of officers and give 
them certificates of non-indehtedness. The settlement of accounts belongs to the 
Treasury Dejiartment. 

E. D. TOWNSEND, 
Assistant Adjutant- Oeneral. 



General Orders, ) War Dept., Adjt. General's Office, 

No. 127. i Washington, July 21, 1865. 

Ordered J That a bureau be organized in the Adjutant-General's 
Office for the collection, safe-keeping, and publication of the rebel 
archives that have come into possession of this Government, the 
bureau to consist of one chief, with the pay of a colonel of cavalry, 
and one assistant, with the pay of a lieutenant-colonel of cavalry, 
and such number of clerks, to be detailed by the Adjutant-General, 
as may be found necessary for the speedy collection of the archives. 
Dr. Francis Lieber is hereby appointed chief of said bureau, and the 
Quartermaster-General is directed to furnish suitable apartments and 
buildings for the collation and custody of the archives mentioned. 

By order of the Secretary of War: 

E. D. TOWNSEND, 
Assistant Adjutant- Oeneral. 



[July 22, 1865. — For General Grant's official report covering oper- 
ations from March, 1864, to May, 1866, see Series I, Vol. XXXVI, 
Parti, p. 12.] 



Circular 1^ War Dept., Adjt. General's Office, 

No. 36. \ Washington, July 22, 1865. 

ORDERS AND INSTRUCTIONS RELATIVE TO THE MUSTER OUT OF CER- 
TAIN VOLUNTEER CAVALRY IN THE DEPARTMENT OF VIRGINIA, 
DEPARTMENT OF NORTH CAROLINA, AND MIDDLE DEPARTMENT; 
ALSO CERTAIN VOLUNTEER INFANTRY AND ARTILLERY IN OTHER 
DEPARTMENTS. 

I. Cavalry. 

Telegram.] War Department, Adjutant-Generals Office, 

Washington y July fi, 1865. 
Maj. Gen. A. H. Terry. U. S. Volunteers. 

Commanding Department of Virginia, Richnumd, Va.: 
The Secretary of War directs that the volunteer cavalry forces in your depart- 
ment be reduced to two re^ments of maximum strength. The musters out of 
the surplus will be by entire regiments, and the said musters, discharges, and 
payments made under the regulations promulgated in General Orders, No. 94, 
current aeries, from this ofiBce. 



96 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. 

Please forward to this office without delay a list of the regiments yoa may 
select for discharge under this order, giving therein for each the strength, preeent 
and absent, respectively. 

THOMAS M. VINCENT, 

Assistant Adjutawt-OenerdL 

Note.— Similar orders sent to the commanding general Department of North 
Carolina to reduce the cavalry in that department to one regiment, and to the 
commanding general Middle Department to reduce tlie caval^ in West Virgii^ 
to one regiment. 

II. Infantry and artillery (whose services are no longer needed) 
ordered mustered out under special instructions, of dates set opposite 
the organizations respectively: 
Pennsylvania, — Two hundred and second Infantry, July 20, 
Delaware. — ^Ahl's Independent Battery, July 20. 
Tennessee. —Fourth Infantry, July 20, 1865. 

E. D. TOWNSEND, 
Assistant Ac^jtUant- General, 



Circular) War Dept., Adjutant General's Office, 

No. 36. J WashingUnty July 26, 1866. 

By an act of the Legislature of the State of Minnesota, approved 
September 27, 1862, the right to vote for certain State ofi&cera is given 
to volunteers or soldiers from that State in the military service of the 
United States, and provision is made for the appointment of com- 
missioners to the regiments of Minnesota Volunteers for the purpose 
of carrying out this act. It is hereby ordered that all such duly 
accredited commissioners from Minnesota be furnished with proper 
facilities for visiting the volunteers from that State, and allowed 
access to them for the purpose indicated. 
By order of the Secretary of War: 

E. D. TOWNSEND, 
Assistant Adjvlard-Oeneral, 



Circular j^ War Dept., Adjutant-General's Office, 

No. 39. J Washington, August 2, 1866. 

ORDERS AND INSTRUCTIONS RELATIVE TO THE MUSTER OUT OF CER- 
TAIN VOLUNTEER WHITE TROOPS, VIZ, INFANTRY, CAVALRY, AND 
ARTILLERY, IN THE DEPARTMENT OF TEXAS, AND ARTILLERY AND 
CAVALRY IN OTHER DEPARTMENTS. 

I. Troops in Department of Texas. 

TsLEORAM.] War Department, Aixjutant-Gekbral's Oppice, 

Washington^ August 1, 18S6. 
Maj. Oen. P. H. Sheridan, U. S. Army, 

Commanding Military Division of the OtUf, New Orleans, La.: 

Yon are anthorized hy the Secretary of War to cause all volxmteer white 
troops— cavalry, infantry, and artillery— serving in the I>ex>artment of Texas, 
that yon think can be dispensed with, to be mastered out of service. 

The mnsters ont will be by entire organizations, inclndin^ all additions thereto 
by recruits and from other sources. In selecting the organizations for discharge 
preference should ge pven to veteran regiments naving tne shortest time to serve. 

The musters out, discharges, and payments will be made under the regulations 
inromu^ted in General Orders, No. 94, current series, from this office, except 
that officers and men who desire to receive their discharges and payments at the 
rendezvous where mustered out will be x^ermitted to do so. 

Please forward to this office without delay a list of the regiments and inde- 
pendent companies you may select for discharge under this order, giving tlierein 



UNION AUTHOBITIB8. 97 

for each the strength, present and absent, respeotively. So soon as the list is 
completed, inform me oy telegraph of the nnmber, present and absent, for the 
respectiTe States. 

Separate lists of those who may desire to receive their discharges and iMtymants 
at 1& rendesYons for mnster out shonld be placed in the huids of the chief 
paymaster, so that he can at once make arrangements for payments. 
Acknowledge receipt of this. 

THOMAS M. VINCENT, 

Astistant Atffutant-Otneral, 

II. Cavalry and artillery (whose services are no longer needed) 
ordered mustered out under special instructions, of dates set opposite 
the organizations respectively : 

Netv For^.— Seventh Artillery (Battalion), July 24, 1866; Second 
Provisional Cavalry, July 23, 1865. 

Pennsylvania, — Second Provisional Cavalry, July 23, 1865; One 
hundred and eighty-seventh Infantry, July 24, 1865. 

E. D. TOWNSEND, 
Assistani Ad jtUarU- General. 



State of Iowa, Adjutant-General's Office, 

Clinton, August 9, 1866. 
Col. T. M. Vincent, 

Assistant Adjuiant-Getieral, WashingtoHy^ D. C: 
Colonel: I have the honor to transmit you exhibit of men fur- 
nished by Ipwa for three-months' term of service (4,816), for which as 
yet the State has not been allowed credit. All the men raised for the 
term of one and two years, except drafted and substitutes, have been 
heretofore reported on the regular monthly exhibits forwarded from 
this office. 

In addition to the 4,816 three-months* men now reported, the State 
has furnished men for which no credit has been given, as follows: 

Not allowed on report of July 30, 1865 779 

Not allowed reported from this office from Octolier 1 , 1864, to May 20, 1865 172 

Not allowed men in Wisconsin regiments 100 

Not aUowed men in Dakota regiments 16 

Not yet reported to yonr office : 

Men in Illinois regiments 465 

Men in Kansas regiments 186 

Men in Nebraska regiments 177 

Total three-years' men 1,8W 

Total two-years' men embraced in reports of January, Febmary, and 

March, 1864 6 

One-year's men reported from October 1, 1864, to May 20, 1865, not yet 

acknowledge 7,4©5 

Eqnal to 2,397 three-years' men not yet aUowed. 

This statement is based on the assumption that all the men 
acknowledged by your Department were counted as for three-years' 
term, and is exclusive of drafted men and substitutes, which class 
has not yet been reported to this office by the acting assistant provost- 
marshal-general of the State. I have the honor to request that tlie 
necessary instructions may be issued directing such a report furnished 
with a view to completion of the records of this office and a final 
adjustment of quotas and credits. 

With great respect, I have the honor to be, truly, yours, 

N. B. BAKER, 
AdjtUant-Oeneral of Iowa, 

7 B B— SKBIES III, VOL. V 



98 COKRESPONDBNGBf ETC. 

Memorandum.] War Deft., Adjt. General's OimcE, 

Washingioriy August 12^ 1866, 
It has been decided that the men of the Signal Corps shall be con- 
sidered, as regards payment of balance of bounty, on the same footing 
as volunteers. 

They will therefore be entitled to receive the balance of bounty in 
the same way as volunteers under the recent orders for discharge on 
account of their services being no longer required. 

SAML. BRECK, 
Assistant Adjutant' Oeneral. 



Circular) War Deft., Adjutant-General's office, 

No. 41. f Washington, August 15, 1865, 

ORDERS AND INSTRUCTIONS RELATIVE TO THE MUSTER OUT OF CER- 
TAIN VOLUNTEER WHITE TROOPS. 

Infantry and heavy artillery in the Middle Department, and Depart- 
ments of Washington, Virginia, North Carolina, Kentuckjs and 
Mississippi. Also certain infantry, cavalry, and artillery in various 
armies and departments. 

I. Infantry and heavy artillery in Middle and other departments. 

Teleorak.] War Department, Adjutant-General*s Office, 

Wcuthingtofiy August 14, 1866, 
Maj. Gen. A. H. Terry, U. S. Volunteers, 

Commanding Department of Virginia, Richmond, Va,: 
The Secretary of War directs that the volunteer white troops-^infantry and 
heavy artillery — in your department be reduced immediately by the discharge of 
5,000 men. The musters out will be by entire organisations, including all addi- 
tions thereto by recruits and from other sources. Organizations having the 
shortest time to serve will be selected for discharge. The musters out, discharges, 
and payments will be made under the regulations promulgated in General Orders, 
No. 94, current series, from this oflBce. * 

Please forward to this office without delays list of the regiments and independ- 
ent companies you may select for discharge under this order, giving therem for 
each the strength, present and absent, respectively. 

8o soon as the list is completed inform me by telegraph of the number, present 
and absent, for the respective States. 
Acknowledge receipt of this. 

THOMAS M. VINCENT, 

Assistant Adjutant-General, 

Note. — Similar orders, dated August 14, were sent the commanding generals of 
the following departments for the discharge of the number of men set opposite 
them, respectively, viz: Middle, 6,000; Washmgton, 8,000; Kentucky , 5,000; North 
Carolina, 8,000; Mississippi, 2,000. 

II. Regiments of infantry, cavalry, and artillery (whose services 
are no loDger required) ordered mustered out of service under special 
instructions, of dates set opposite them I'espectively: 

New York, — Fifteenth Heavy Artillery, August 8, 18G5; Fifth 
Infantry, August 9, 1865; Sixty-second Infantry, August 14, 1865; 
Sixty-sixth Infantry, August 14, 1865. 

Pennsylvania, — One Hundred and eighty-sixth Infantry, August 8, 
1865. 

Indiana, — Ninth Cavalry, August 10, 1865; Tenth Cavalrv, August 
10, 1865. 

Memoranda. — August J, ISOo.—Tlw onler of August 2 (Circular 
No. 30, current series, Adjutant-Gouenil's Office), relative to discharge 



UNION AUTHORITIB8. 99 

of troox)B in the Dex>artmeDt of Texas, ^was extended to include the 
Department of Louisiana. 

E. D. TOWNSEND, 

Assistant Adjutani-Oeneral. 



Chattanooga, Tknn., Augtist 15, 1866. 
Brig. Gen. D. C. McCallum, 

Director and Oeneral Manaaer Military 

Railroads of the United States: 
Genebal: In compliance with your order of the 3l8t ultimo, I here- 
with transmit a report of operations of the Construction Corps, U. S. 
Military Railroads, Division of the Tennessee, from .June 1, 1865 
(the date of my last report), to August 1, 1865. At the date of my 
former report we had an effective force of 1,200 men, composed of 
the First, Seventh, and part of the Fourth Divisions, all of whom 
were employed in the reconstruction of the Chattanooga and Atlanta 
Railroad, which had been opened at that time to the Etowah River. 
From thence to Atlanta, forty-five miles, the road had been totally 
destroyed by General Sherman prior to his evacuation of the city. 
Upon the completion of the bridge across the Etowah, three spans of 
which had been destroyed, the whole of the carpenter force was dis- 
tributed along the line and employed in cutting and hauling out 
cross-ties. One division of trackmen were employed laying the iron, 
whilst another division was clearing off the debris and surfacing up 
track, thereby allowing the use of the road as fast as the iron was laid. 
I had at the same time a large force of the Seventh Division of track- 
men at Chattanooga straightening crooked rails, which were used • 
exclusively in laying the track between Etowah to Marietta. We 
crossed the Etowah bridge June 5, having been four days rebuilding 
it, and reached Allatoona on the morning of the 15th. Upon reaching 
this point I sent the bridge force of the First Division ahead to 
Allatoona Creek, who by the time we reached it with the track had 
the bridge, 200 feet in length, including a truss of 50 feet, completed 
and ready for crossing. Reached Acworth on the 20th and turned 
the road over to the transportation department, who commenced 
operating it at once to that point. Again sent forward the carpenter 
force to Big Slianty and points south of it, and whilst a part were 
getting out ties another party commenced laying track northward, 
thus enabling us to close up the gap of six miles in four days, reach- 
ing the latter point on the 24th. Rebuilt water-tank and frame and 
put up a pump at Moon Station, two miles north of Big Shanty. 
Between Big Shanty and Marietta there was laid by colored troops, 
under the direction of General Winslow, commanding at Atlanta, 
about three miles of iron which they had gathered up and straight- 
ened. It was laid without chairs, and owing to the scarcity of spike 
only about one-fourth spiked. Put up a tank, frame, and pump at 
Kenesaw Mountain, and reached Marietta on the 29th. From Marietta 
to Atlanta, which point we reached on the morning of July 4, the track 
had been laid, with the exception of about three miles, by paities 
under the direction of General Winslow. There was but little of it 
spiked, and few or no chairs on, excepting from the Chattahoochee to 
Atlanta. They also built the Chattahoochee bridge, a structure 725 
feet in length and 90 feet in height, and a trestle 400 feet in length 
around a break in the high embankment near Vining's, caused by the 
destruction of a culvert. The expense incurred in building the 
Chattahoochee bridge, the trestle at Vining's, and laying some 



100 



COBBEBPOHDBNCE, ETC. 



eighteen miles of track, in addition to the labor of troops, was as 
follows: 

Co6t of bridffe, as per settlement of Gtoneral Winslow with Qrant & Co. , baUdera, 
and approved oy G^eral Wilson : 

725 feet (lineal) of bridginjj, at $11 per foot $7,975 

Amount dne for track laying, as per check rolls, approved as above 7, 187 

Amotmt of work done at culvert near Vining's, approved as above 528 

Totalamount 15,670 

The above amount ($15,670) I think is justly chargeable to construc- 
tion, and would therefore respectfully recommend its payment. The 
work was done by order of Major-General Wilson, commanding 
Cavalry Corps in Georgia, and at a cost less perhaps than we could 
have done it ourselves, besides very materially expediting the com- 
pletion of the road. 

At Atlanta we have put down extensive side-tracks, amounting in 
the aggregate to over three miles, and have erected a large freight 
platform 400 feet in length by 30 in width, with a shed roof over part 
of it. Upon the completion of the road to Atlanta, and after having 
put the track in a thorough condition, I again commenced a reduc- 
tion of the corps, which at this date amounts to but little over 200 
men. With the small bridge force retained, I am putting the Howe 
truss bridge, ordered for Allatoona Creek a year ago, and stored at 
Chattanooga, across the chasm in the bank, near Vining's, produced 
by the destruction of the culvert before alluded to. The break is 
upward of 100 feet in width and gradually increasing, and the trestle 
around it on so insecure a foundation I have thought it advisable to 
substitute it with a bridge. The balance of my track force are 
gathering up the crooked iron on the Chattanooga and Atlanta road. 
Below please find a recapitulation of work done in June and July, 
expenditure of material, amount of iron manufactured at rolling-mill, 
and amount of pay-rolls for June and July, exclusive of wages paid 
at rolling-mill. 

Summary of work done on the Chattanooga and Atlanta Railroad 
during June and July, 1865: 28 miles of track relaid; 41 miles of track 
surfaced and repaired; 525 feet (lineal) of bridging; 42,000 cross-ties 
cut and delivered; 3,000 cubic feet of timber cut; 6 water-tanks 
erected; 20 switches and frogs put in. 

Expenditureof material: 14,794 iron rails (20feet long), 18,000 chairs, 
1,140 kegs railroad spike, 60 kegs bridge spike, 20 frogs and switches, 
5 water-tanks (complete), 3,000 cubic feet timber, 42,000 cross-ties. 

Cost of labor in June and July: Amount of pay-roll for June, 
$117,866.91; for July, 176,361. 

Report of iron manufactured at U. S. Military Railroad roUing-miil at Chattanooga, 
Tenn,, up to July 31, 1866, 



Date. 



Articles. 



To J ane 1,1865 Ifon rails . 

ToJoiieaO,18C& do .... 

ToJalv31.1885 do.... 



Totsi. 



Hannfao- 
land. 



PoundM. 
2.264.380 
1. 156, 292 
1.365,100 



4,785.712 



lasiMd. 



POMUdM. 

916,026 



28.402 



Ob hand. 



PoundM. 
1.S48.294 
2.504,588 
3,841.194 



Tons 

Ma&ofactnred to dato 3,196 

Issued to date 421 

On band to date 1.715 



UNION AUTHORITIES. 101 

Plans and drawings of the rolling-mill, with an estimate of its 
cost, were forwarded to A. Anderson, esq., chief superintendent and 
engineer, ten days ago. 

I have the honor to he, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

L. H. EICHOLTZ, 
Acting Chief Engineer Government Railroads 

Division of the Tennessee. 



Quartermaster-General's Office, 
Washington y I). C, August 21, 1866, 
Hon. E. M. Stanton, 

Secret ary of War, WashingUmy D. C: 

Sir; I have the honor to transmit herewith letter of Brevet Major- 
General Webster, dated July 23, 1805, referred for report. 

The Quartermaster-General is fully impressed with the importance 
of restoring the Southern railroads to civil control. Paragraph II, 
General Oniers, No. 77, War Department, April 28, 1865, directed 
that all purchases for railroad construction and transportation be 
stopped. 

This paragraph the Quartermaster-General republished in his Gen- 
eral Orders, No. 24, April 29, 1865, calling special attention thereto, 
and directed (paragraph Yl) that all railroad construction and repairs, 
except those need^ on lines by which troops are still supplied or by 
which troops may be marching, will cease. 

The Quartermaster-General, on the 19th of May, 18G5, made report 
recommending a basis for transfer of railroads to their owners, and in 
this report anticipated most of the considerations presented by General 
Webster. Reference is respectfully made to that report.* 

Orders have been given to the general manager U. S. Military Rail- 
roads for the relinquishment of the railroads under his control in 
Virginia and North Carolina and in the Southwest; and on the 1st of 
August, 1865, a recommendation was forwarded to the War Depart- 
ment that two roads, reported by General McCallum as the only ones 
in his control of which the transfer had not been ordered, should be 
also ordered to be turned over. 

The railroads in the Military Division of the Gulf not having l)eeii 
under control of General McCallum, the chief quartermaster of that 
division has been instructed to turn these over to parties approved 
by the general commanding. 

Orders, therefore, have been given for the transfer to their com- 
panies of all railroads in military possession as soon as parties quali- 
fied and willing to assume chai^ of them present themselves. 

Specific instructions from the Secretary of War or from the 
lieutenant-general to the military commanders of departments and 
districts urging upon them the importance of transferring all these 
railroads to their civil managers, and directing them to communicate 
with the civil authorities and endeavor t'O eifect this transfer in all 
cases, would probably hasten the event. 

Upon return from a short absence on duty in Missouri the Quarter- 
master-General found that the great lines of railroads diverging from 
Nashville, though ordered to be turned over under authority of the 
Secretary of War dated July 21, 1865, were still under Government 
control, and he is informed that no responsible parties have as yet 

See p. 26. 



102 C0BEE8K)NDENCE, ETC. 

qualified themselves to take charge of them. Probably Major-General 
Thomas, if his attention is directed to the urgent importance of the 
subject by. the Secretary of War or by the lieutenant-general, may 
be able to induce the representatives of the owners of the roads to 
qualify themselves to take charge of them. 

Schedules of all rolling-stock and railroad equipment the property 
of the United States are being prepared with a view to their sale. 

The sale of much railroad property in Virginia and at several 
other points has been already advertised. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

M. C. MEIGS, 
Quartermaster' Oeneral^ Brevet Major- Oener ah 

[InelMure.] 

Macon, Ga., Jidy 2S, 1866. 
Lieut. Gen. U. S. Grant, 

Comdg. Armies of the United States, Washington^ 2). C; 

General: I deem it my duty to earnestly recommend that the 
railroads now operated by the United States be turned over to their 
respective companies so soon as (1) those companies shall elect offi- 
cers and directors who can be relied on as thoroughly loyal to the 
Government, and (2) the accounts between the railroads and the 
Gk>vernment can be properly adjusted. 

Although, as I have heretofore said, the roads might be economic- 
ally and advantageously operated by the Government, it -is yet not 
likely that, as a matter of fact, they will be so operated, and conse- 
quently they should be given up at the earliest moment that the two 
above specified conditions can be fulfilled. 

In the meantime, the United States ought not to be at the expense 
of putting the roads in thorough reimir merely for the benefit of the 
comiMinies. All work on track or bridges b^ond what is absolutely 
necessary for the safety of trains should be discontinued. All repairs 
to locomotives and cars to which the companies have any claim should 
be stopped at once, as should also the running of the rolling-mill at 
Chattanooga. 

The proper adjustment of accounts between the Government and 
the roads will require a good deal of consideration. Some of the 
roads have been put by the Government in a much better condition 
than they were before it took possession. It will not be right to give 
them, without i)ay, the advantage of thorough repairs, new iron, 
permanent bridges, Ac. If they claim compensation for the use of 
their roads, it is sufficient to answer that in the early stages of the 
war they voluntarily and zealously aided the enemy, furnishing them 
not only with the great * * interior lines " of communication and supply, 
of which all have heard so much, but with knowing heads and ready 
hands to operate them. Their able railroad men were of more serv- 
ice to the rebels than many of their general officers. No claim of 
theirs for pay or damages should be entertained a moment. It is 
only necessary to find out how much they are fairly indebted to the 
United States. To do this, the disbursing officers should be called 
on for reports of expenditures for permanent improvements. 

Of course it will be necessary, previous to relinquishing the roads, 
to make agreements as to future transportation of troops and sup- 
plies, mails, and such other matters as the convenience of the Gov- 
ernment may require. 



UNION AUTHORITIES. 108 

The points herein noticed may have been already fully considered 
and decided upon, but as they are included in the letter of my 
instructions for my present duty, I make the suggestions, with a 
strong impression of the importance of early action in the matter. 
1 am, very respectfully, general, your most obedient servant, 

J. D. WEBSTER, 

Brevet Major-QeneroL, 



Gensbai. Ordbrs, ) War Deft., Adjt. General's Office, 

No. 137. ) WashingUm, August 31, 1866. 

The following proclamations of the President of the United States 
in relation to restrictions on trade are published for the information 
and guidance of all concerned : 

I. AuQuat t9, 1866, — Removing restrictions on articles contraband of war. 

Bt the Pbbsu>xmt of thb United Statbs of America: 

a fboclamation. 

Whereas, by my proclamations of the thirteenth and twenty-fourth of Jane, 
one thonsand ei^ht hnndred and sixty-five, removing restrictions, in put, npon 
internal, domestic, and coaetwisi) intercourse and trade with those States reoentlv 
declared in insurrection, certain articles were excepted from the effect of saia 
proclamations as contraband of war; and whereas, the necessity for restricting 
trade in said articles has now, in a neat measure, ceased: It is hereby ordered that 
on and after the first dav of Septemoer , one thousand eight hundred and sixty-five, 
all restrictions aforesaid be removed, so that the articles declared by the said proc- 
lamationfl to be contraband of war may be imported into and sold in said Sntes, 
subject only to such r^^lations as the Secretarv of the Treasury may prescribe. 

In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my nand and caused the seal cf tiie 
United States to be afftxed. 

Done at the city of Washing^ton this twenty-ninth day of August, in the year 
of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-five, and of the Independence of 
the United States of America the eighty-ninth fninetiethl. 

fe8.] ANDREW JOHNSON, 

the President: 

WILLIAM H. SEWARD, 

Secretary of State. 

n. June IS, 1866. — ^Removing restrictions on trade east of the Missiasippi River, 
and declaring insurrection suppressed in Tennessee, and certain disamlities in 
that State removed. 

By the President of the United States or America : 

A PROCLAMATION. 

Whereas, by my proclamation of the twenty-ninth of Aprilfone thousand eight 
hundred and sixty-five, all restrictions upon internal, domestic and commennal 
intercourse, with certain exceptions therein specified and set forth, were removed 
'*in such parts of the States of Tennessee, Virginia, North Carolina, South Caro- 
lina, G(eorgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, and so much of Louisiana as lies 
east of the Mississippi River as shall be embraced within the lines of national 
military occupation;'^ 

And whereas, by my proclamation of the twenty-second of May, one thonsand 
ei^ht hundred and sixtv-five, for reasons therein given, it was declared that cer- 
tain ports of the United States which had been previously closed against foreign 
commerce should, with certain specified exceptions, be reopened to such com- 
merce on and after the first dav of July next, subject to the laws of the United 
States, and in pursuance of sucn regulations as might be prescribed by the Secre- 
tary of the Treasury; . 

And whereas, I am satifactorily informed that dangerous combinations against 
the laws of the United States no longer exist within the State of Tennessee; tluit the 
insurrection heretofore existing witnin said State has been suppressed; that within 

♦Exwntive order; nee p. 105. 



104 GORBESPONDENCE, ETC. 

the bonndaries thereof the authority of the United States is andispnted, and that 
snch officers of the United States as have been dnly commissioned are in the 
undisturbed exercise of their official functions : 

Now, therefore, be it known, that I, Andrew Johnson, President of the United 
States, do hereby declare that all restrictions upon internal, domestic, and coast- 
yrise intercourse and trade^ and upon the removal of products of States hereto- 
fore declared in insurrection, reserving and excepting only those relating to 
contraband of war, as hereinafter recited, and also those which relate to the res- 
ervation of the rights of the United States to proper^ purchased in the territory 
of an enemy, heretofore imposed in the territory of the United States east of the 
Mississippi Kiver, are annulled, and I do hereby direct that they be forthwith 
removed ; and that, on and after the first day of July next, all restrictions upon 
foreign commerce with said ports, with the exception and reservation aforesaid, 
be lixewise removed; and that the commerce of said States shall be conducted 
under the supervision of the regularly appointed officers of the customs provided 
by law; and such officers of the customs shall receive any captured and aban- 
doned property that may be turned over to them, under the law, by the military 
or naval forces of the United States, and dispose of such property as shall to 
directed by the Secretary of the Treasurv. The following articles contraband of 
war are excepted from the effect of this xiroclamation : Arms, ammunition, all 
articles from which ammunition is made, and gra^ uniforms and cloth. 

And I hereby also proclaim and declare that me insurrection, so far as it relates 
to and within the State of Tennessee, and the inhabitants of the said State of 
Tennessee as recognized and constituted under their recently adopted constitu- 
tion and reorganization, and accepted bv them, is suppressed ; and therefore, also, 
that fJl the disabilities and disqualifications attacning to said State and the 
inhabitants thereof consequent upon any proclamations issued by virtue of the 
fifth section of the act entitled **An act further to provide for tne collection of 
duties on imports, and for other purposes," approved the thirteenth day of July, 
one thousand eight hxmdred and sixtv-one, are removed. 

But nothing herein contained shall be considered or construed as in any wise 
changing or impairing any of thepenalties and forfeitures for treason heretofore 
incurred under the laws of the United States, or any of the provisions, restric- 
tions, or disabilities set forth in my proclamation beaming date the twenty-ninth 
day of May, one thousand eight hundred and sixty-five, or as impairing existing 
regulations for the suspension of the habeas corpus, and the exercise of military 
law in cases where it shall be necessary for the general public safety and welfare 
during the existing insurrection; nor shall this proclamation affect, or in any 
way impair, any laws heretofore passed by Congress, and duljr approved by the 
President, or any proclamations or orders issued b^ him during the aforesaid 
insurrection, abolishing slavery, or in any way affecting the relations of slavery, 
whether of persons or [of] property; but, on the c<mtrary,all such laws and proc- 
lamations heretofore made or issued are expressly saved and declared to be in full 
force and virtue. 

In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the 
United States to be affixed. 

Done at the city of Washington this thirteenth dav of June, in the year of our 
Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-five, ana of the Independence of the 
United States of America the eighty-ninth. 

[L.8.] ANDREW JOHNSON. 

By the President: 

WILLIAM H. SEWARD, 

Secretary of State. 

in. June f4y 1866. — Removing restrictions on trade west of the Mississippi River. 

Bt thb President of the United States of America: 

a proclamation. 

Whereas, it has been the desire of the Gheneral Government of the United States 
to restore unrestricted commercial intercourse between and in the several States, 
as soon as the same could be safely done in view of resistance to the authority of 
the United States by combinations of armed insurgents ; 

And whereas, that desire has been shown in my proclamations of the twentj^- 
ninth of April, one thousand eight hundred and sixtv-five ; the thirteenth of June, 
one thousand eight hundred and sixty-five ; and the twenty-third of June, one 
thousand eight hundred and sixty-five ; 

And whereas, it now seems expedient and proi)er to remove restrictions upon 



UNION AUTHORITIES. 105 

internal, domestic, and ooastwise trade and commercial interconrse between and 
witinn the States and Territories west of the Mississippi River: 

Now, therefore, be it known that I, Andrew Johnson, President of the United 
States, do hereby declare that all restrictions npon internal, domestic, and coast- 
wise intercourse and trade, and npon the purcnase and removal of products of 
States and parts of States and Territories heretofore declared in insurrection, 
lying west of the Mississippi River (exceptins only those relating to property 
heretofore purchased by the agents or captureof by or surrendered to the forces of 
the Unitea States, and to the transportation thereto or therein, on private 
aocoont, of arms, ammunition, all articles from which ammunition is made, 
eray uniforms and gray cloth) , are annulled, and I do hereby direct that they be 
lorUiwith removed; and also, that the commerce of such States and parts of 
States shall be conducted under the supervision of the regularly appointed offi- 
cers of the customs, [who] shall receive any captured and abandoned property 
that may be turned over to them, under the law, by the military or naval forces 
of the united States, and dispose of the same in accordance with instructions on 
the subject issued by the Secretary of the Treasury. 

In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the 
United States to be affixed. 

Done at the city of Washington this twenty-fourth day of June, in the year of 
oar Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-five, and of the Independence of 
the United States of America the eighty-ninth. 

[L.8.] ANDREW JOHNSON. 

By the President: 

W. HUNTER. 
Acting Secretary of State. 

IV. April S9, 1866, — ^Executive order removing restrictions on trade, except in 

articles contraband of war, in certain States. 

ExECDTivE Chamber, 
Washington^ April 29^ 1866. 

Being desirous to relieve all loyal citizens and well-disxK>6ed persons residing in 
insurrectionary States from unnecessary commercial restrictions, and to encourage 
them to return to peaceful pursuits, it is hereby ordered : 

I. That all restrictions upon internal, domestic, and coastwise commercial inter- 
course be discontinued in such parts of the States of Tennessee, Virginia, North 
Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida. Alabama, Mississippi, and so much 
of Louisiana as lies east of the Mississippi Kiver as shall be embraced within the 
lines of national military occupation, excepting only such restrictions as are 
imposed by acts of Congress ana regulations in pursuance thereof, prescribed by 
the Secretanr of the Treasury and approved by the President, and excepting also 
from the effect of this order the following articles contraband of war, to wit, 
arms, ammunition, all articles from which ammunition is manufactured, gray 
xmiforms and cloth, locomotives, cars, railroad iron, and machinery for operating 
railroads, telegraph wires, insulators, and instruments for operating telegraph* 
lines. 

n. All existing military and naval orders in any manner restricting internal, 
domestic, and coastwise commercial intercourse and trade with or in the locali- 
ties above named be, and the same are hereby, revoked ; and that no military or 
naval officer in any manner intermj^t or interfere with the same, or with any 
boats or other vessels engaged therem, under proper authority, pursuant to the 
regolations of the Secretaoy of the Treasury. 

ANDREW JOHNSON. 

V. May jRf , 1866, — Reopening of ports, except four in Texas, disallowing bel- 
ligerent rights in certain cases, and removing certain restrictions on trade. 

By thb President of the United States of America : 

a proclamation. 

Whereas, by the proclamation of the President of the eleventh day of April 
last, certain jtoris of the United States therein specified, which had previously 
been subject to blockade, were, for objects of public safety, declared, in con- 
formity with previous special legislation of Congress, to be closed against foreign 
conunerce during the national will, to be thereafter expressed and made known 
by the President; and whereas, events and circumstances have since occurred 



106 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. 

which in my judgment render it expedient to remove that restriction, except as 
to the ports of Ghdveston, La Salle, Brazos de Santiago (Point Isahel), and 
Brownsville, in the State of Texas : 

Now, therefore, be it known that I, Andrew Johnson, President of the United 
States, do hereby declare that the ports aforesaid, not excepted as above, shall be 
open to foreign commerce from and after the first day of July next ; that com- 
mercial intercourse with the said ports may from tiiat time be carried on subject 
to the laws of the United States, and in pursuance of such regulations as may be 
prescribed by the Secretary of the Treasury. If, however, an^ vessel from a 
foreign port shall enter any of the before-named excepted ports m the State of 
Texas, she will continue to be held liable to the penalties prescribed bv the act of 
Congress approved on the thirteenth day of Julv, eighteen hundred ana sixty-one, 
and the persons on board of her to such penalties as may be incurred, pursuant to 
the laws of war, for tradingor attemptmg to trade witn an enemy. 

And I, Andrew Johnson, President of the United States, do hereby declare and 
make known that the United States of America do, henceforth, disallow to all 
persons trading, or attempting to trade, in any ports of the United States in 
violation of the laws thereof, all pretense of belligerent rifrhts and privileges ; 
and I ffive notice that, from the date of this proclamation, all such offenders will 
be held and dealt with as pirates. 

It is also ordered that all restrictions upon tikde heretofore imposed in the 
territory of the United States east of the Mississippi River, save those relating to 
contraband of war, to the reservation of the rights X>f the United States to prop- 
erty purchased in the territory of an enemy, and to the twenty-five per cent, 
upon purchases of cotton, be removed. All provisions of the internal revenue 
law win be carried into effect under the proper officers. 

In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the 
United States to be afOxed. 

Done at the city of Washington this twenty-second day of May, in the year 
of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-five, and of the Independence 
of the United States of America the eighty-ninth. 

[L.8.] ANDREW JOHNSON. 

By the President; ^ 

W. HUNTER, 
Acting Secretary of State, 

VI. June ts, i«fi5.— Rescinding the blockade as to all ports of the United 
States, including that of Ghdveston. 

By the President of the United STiVTSs of America: 

A PROCLAMATION. 

Whereas, by the proclamations of the President of the nineteenth and twenty- 
seventh of April, eighteen hundred and sixty-one, a blockade of certain ports of 
the United States was set on foot ; but whereas, the reasons for that measure 
have ceased to exist : 

Now, therefore, be it known that I, Andrew Johnson, President of the United 
States, do hereby declare and proclaim the blockade aforesaid to be rescinded as 
to all the ports aforesaid, including that of Galveston and other ports west of the 
Mississippi River, which ports will be open to foreign commerce on the &rst of 
July next, on the terms and conditions set forth in my proclamation of the 
twenty-second of May last. 

It is to be understood, however, that the blockade thus rescinded was an inter- 
national measure for the purpose of protecting the sovereign rights of the United 
States. The greater or less subversion of civil authority in the reflfion to which 
it applied, and the impracticability of at once restoring that in due efficiency, 
may, for a season, maxe it advisable to employ the Army and Navy of the United 
States toward carrying the laws into effect, wherever such employment may be 
necessary. 

In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the 
United States to be affixed. 

Done at the city of Washington this twenty-third day of June, in the year of 
our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-five, ana of the Independence of 
the United States of America the eighty-ninth. 

[L. 8.J ANDREW JOHNSON. 

By the President : 

W. HUNTER, 
Aciitig Secretary of State, 



UKION AUTHORITIB8. 107 

Yn. AprU 7/,7i86^.^CloBing certain ports. 

By THk PRmi>S!fT of the Unitbd States of America: 

A PROCLAMATION. 

Whereae, by my proclamatioiiB of the nineteenth and twenty nseventh days of 
Afxril, one thoaaaDa eiffbt hundred and sixty-one, -theporte of the United States 
in the States of Virginia, North Carolina, Sonth Carolina, Georgia, Florida, 
Alabama, Mississippi, Lonisiana, and Texas were declared to be subject to 
blockade; but whereas, the said blockade has, in consequence of actual military 
occupation by this Qoyemment, since been conditionally set aside or relaxed in 
respect to the ports of Norfolk and Alexandria, in the State of Virginia ; Beau* 
fort, in the State of North Carolina ; Port Royal, in the State of South Carolina ; 
Pensacola and Femandina, in the State of Florida, and New Orleans, in the State 
of Louisiana; 

And whereas, by the fourth section of the act of Congress approved on the thir- 
teenth of July, eighteen hundred and sixty-one, entitled **An act further to pro- 
Tide for the coUection of duties on imports, and for other purposes,*' the President, 
for the reasons therein set forth, is authorized to close certain ports of entry : 

Now, therefore, be it known that 1, Abraham Lincoln, President of the United 
States, do hereby proclaim that thejoprts of Richmond, Tappahannock, Cherry- 
stone, Torktown, and Petersburff , in Virginia ; of Camden (l^lisabeth City) , Eden- 
ton, Plymouth, Washington, New Beme» Ocracoke. and wilminston, m North 
Dut>lina: of Charleston, Qeorgetown, and Beaufort, in South Carouna ; of Savan- 
nah, Saint Mary's, and Brunswick (Darien), in Georgia; of Mobile, in Alabama; 
of Pearl River (Shieldsborough), Natchez, and Vicksbui^, in Mississippi; of Saint 
Augustine, Key West, Saint Mark's (Port Leon), Saint John's (Jacksonville), and 
Apalachicola, in Florida; of Teche (Franklin), in Louisiana; of Qalveston, La 
Sule, Brazos de Santiago (Point Isabel), and Brownsville, in Texas, are hereby 
closed, and all right of importation, warehousing, and other privileges shall, in 
respect to the ports aforesaid, cease, until they shall have agam been opened by 
order of the President; and if, while said ports are so closed, any ship or vessel 
from beyond the United States, or having on board an v articles subject to duties, 
shall attempt to enter any such ports, the same, together with its taclde, apparel, 
furniture, and cargo, shall be forfeited to the United States. 

In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the 
United States to be afSxed. 

Done at the city of Washington this eleventh day of April, in the year of our 
Lord one thousana eight himc&ed and sixty-five, and of the Independence of the 
United States of America the eighty-ninth. 

[L.8.] ABRAHAM UN(X)LN. 

By the President : 

WILLIAM H. SEWARD, 

Secretary of State. 

Vin. AprU 11, i^65.— Port of Key West to remain open. 

By the President op the United States of America: 

A PROCLAMATIOK. 

Whereas, bv my proclamation of this date the port of Key West, in the State of 
Florida, was inadvertently included among those which are not open to commerce: 

Now, therefore, be it known that I, Abraham Lincoln, President of the United 
States, do hereby declare and make known that the said port of Key West is and 
shall remain open to foreign and domestic commerce upon the same conditions by 
which that commerce has there hitherto been governed. 

In testimony whereof 1 have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the 
United States to be affixed. 

Done at the city of Washington this eleventh day of April, in the vear of our 
Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-five, and of the Independence of the 
United States of America the eighty-ninth. 

[L. 8.] ABRAHAM LINCOLN. 

By the President: 



By order of the Secretary of WaT: 



WILLIAM H. SEWARD, 

Secretary of State. 

E. D. TOWNSEND, 

Assistant Adjtdant-Oenercd. 



108 C0RRE8K)NDENCE, ETC. 

Circular ) War Dept., Adjutant-General's Office, 

No. 44. J Waahingtony Sepieniher 9, 1865. 

ORDERS AND INSTRUCTIONS RELATIVE TO THE MUSTER OUT OF CER- 
TAIN VOLUNTEERS, VIZ, ORGANIZATIONS OF COLORED TROOPS 
ENLISTED IN NORTHERN STATES, AND CERTAIN WHITE TROOPS IN 
VARIOUS ARMIES AND DEPARTMENTS. 

I. Organizations of colored trooi>B enlisted in Northern States. 

Telegram.] War Department, Adjutakt-General's Office, 

Washington^ September 8, 1805. 
Commanding General Department of North Carolina, 

JRaleigh, N, C; 
The Secretary of War directs that all organisationB of colored troope in yofo: 
department which were enlisted in the Northern States be mastered ont of seryice 
immediately. The masters ont will be by entire organizations, inclnding all 
additions thereto by recmits and from other sonrces. The masters out, dis- 
charges, and payments will be made onder the regolations promulgated in 
General Orders, No. 94, cnrrent series, from this office. 

Please forward to this ofBce withoat delaj a list of the regiments and independ- 
ent comi)anies to be discharged onder this order, giving therein for each the 
strength, present and absent, respectively. 
Aclmowiedge receipt of this. 

THOMAS M. VINCENT, 

Assistant Adjutant-OeneraL 

Note.— Orders similar to the foregoing, dated September 8, were sent to the 
commanding generals of the Departments of Virginia, Florida, Texas, Lonisiana, 
and Arkansas. 

II. White troops in various departments — servioes no lon^^r 
required. 

MEMORANDA. 

1. August 21^ 1866. — Major-General Reynolds, commanding Depart- 
ment of Arkansas, was directed to muster out 3,000 additional troops 
of his command. 

2. August 2^^ 1866. — Major-General Hooker, commanding the De- 
partment of the East, was directed to cause the two remaining '* Inde- 
pendent companies, Maine Coast Guards," to be mustered out. 

3. September i, 1866. — ^Major-General Hooker was directed to relieve 
from duty for muster out Companies A and B, New Hampshire Heavy 
Artillery, and Company D, First Battalion Massachusetts Heavy 
Artillery. 

4. September 8, 1866. — Major-General Augur, commanding Depart- 
ment or Washington, was ordered to reduce the volunteer force in his 
command to 0,000 commissioned officers and enlisted men, of all arms. 

E. D, TOWNSEND, 
Assistant AcytUant-Qeneral. 



War Deft., Provost-Marshal-General^s Office, 

Washington^ D. C, September 11 j 1866. 
[Hon. E. M. Stanton, 

Secretary of War:] 

Under the general orders of the War Department I, sometime 

since, discharged all the employes in the different districts who could 

be spared, so that now there is in a district only a provost-marshal 

and one clerk, and they are engaged in closing up old business. Some 



UNION AUTHOBITIE8. 109 

districts have been consolidated, and one provost-marshal is acting 
for two or more consolidated districts. The arrest of deserters by 
this Bureau cannot therefore be effected, unless it is deemed best by 
the Secretary of War to order that provost-marshals employ and pay 
suitable persons for that purpose, or that a reward be allowed for the 
arrest and delivery of deserters to provost-marshals, the reward being 
made large enough to induce outsiders to engage in the business. 
Section 21 of the act approved March 3, 1865, is as follows: 

8bc. 21. And he it further enacted. That, in addition to the other lawful penal- 
tiee of the crime of djBsertion from the military or naval service, all perBons who 
hive deserted the military or naval service ox the United States, who shall not 
return to said service, or report themselves to a provost-marshal, within sixty days 
after the proclamation hereinafter mentioned, shall he deemed and taken to have 
volnntarily relinqnished and forfeited their rights of citixenship and their rights 
to become citizens ; and snch deserters shall be forever incapable of holding any 
ofiBoe of trost or profit under the United States, or of exercinng any rights of cit- 
isens thereof; and all persons who shall hereafter desert the military or naval 
service, and all persons who, being duly enrolled, shall depart the jurisdiction of 
the district in wnich he is enroUed, or go beyond the limits of the u nited States, 
with intent to avoid any draft into the military or naval service, duly ordered, 
shall be liahle to the penaltiee of this section. And the Presiaent is hereby 
authorized and required f orthwith. on the passage of this act, to issue his proclama- 
tion setting forth the provisions of this section, in which proclamation the Presi- 
dent is requested to notify all deserters returning within sixty days as aforesaid, 
that they shall be pardoned on condition of returning to tneir regiments and 
companies, or to such other organization as they may be assigned to, untU tiiey 
shall have served for a period of time equal to their original term of enlistment 

To make this law operative the fact of desertion should be estab- 
lished and announced in each case, if possible. The undertaking, 
however, would be one of magnitude. Two hundred and sixty thou- 
sand three hundred and thirty-nine men have been reported to this 
office as deserters from the Army. I estimate that 25 per cent, of these 
are not deserters in fact, but are men who became abisentees uninten- 
tionally or unavoidably, and afterward returned to duty. Adopting 
this estimate, the total number of desertions appears to be 195,255 
from the ranks of the Army. Seventy-six thousand two hundred and 
fifty-three deserters have been arrested by this Bureau, as required 
by the seventh section of the enrollment act, approved March 3, 1863, 
which is still in force and is as follows: 

Sbc. 7. And he it further enacted. That it shall be the duty of the provost- 
marshals to arrest all deserters, whether regolar, volunteer, militiamen, or per- 
sons called into the service under this or any other act of Oongress, wherever 
they may be foond, and to send them to the nearest military oommission or mil- 
itary post. 

Only 1,755 deserters surrendered themselves under the President's 
proclamation of March 11, 1865, offering pardon to all who would 
return to duty. There are therefore still at large 117,247 deserters 
from the ranks of the Array. This number does not include the non- 
reporting drafted men, who are deemed deserters by the law; of this 
class there are, by the reports, 161,286. It may be estimated that 30 
per cent, of these are excusable, some having entered the service after 
having been drafted, others were absent at sea, and for various other 
causes the absence of many was unavoidable and excusable. Making 
the reduction of 30 per cent, gives 112,901 as the number of non- 
reporting drafted men who are deemed deserters, which, added to 
the number of deserters from the ranks, makes the total number of 
deserters still at large 230,148. 

JAMES B. FRY, 
Provost-Marshal' OeneraL 



110 COBBBSPOKDBKCEy ETC. 

[Imolosare.] 

Colonel John Ely, acting assistant provost-marahal-geneTal, Tren- 
ton, N. J., May 27, 1865, refers for instructions a communication from 
Capt. William M. Shipman, provost-marshal Third District of New 
Jersey, stating that many men drafted in his district in May and 
July, 1864, who fled to Canada and other parts unknown after being 
drafted, are now returning home, much to the dissatisfaction of the 
loyal portion of the community. Desires to know if they are to be 
arrested as deserters, and if so, what means are to be taken to secure 
their arrest, as he has no officers and no authority to employ any, and 
no guards to send in charge of them should they be arrested by 
citizens. 

F. C. Reed, of Clyde, Wayne County, New York, July 31, 1865, 
states that the citizens of that section of country are apprehensive 
that their private property is insecure from the large number of 
sneaks and deserters who have recently com*e among them, and who 
threaten the good order of the community. He desires to know the 
status of this class of persons, and if they are subject to arrest as 
deserters. If they are, he asks for the appoinment of a suitable per- 
son to fmprehend and deliver them to the proper authorities. 

Bvt. Lieut. Col. R. I. Dodge, acting assistant provost-marshal-gen- 
eral for New York City, N. Y., August 2, 1866, recommends that the 
usual reward of $30 be paid for the apprehension and delivery of all 
deserters from the Regular Army to the proper officers, as there are 
large numbers of these deserters who show themselves with impunity 
in New York and Brooklyn, relying upon the absence of reward to 
secure them from arrest. 

Bvt. Lieut. Col. R.M. Littler, acting assistant provost-marshal-gen- 
eral for Maine, August 12, 1865, forwards a communication from Capt. 
£lijah Low, provost-marshal, Fourth District of Maine, representing 
that his district is overrun with deserters from the Army and draft; 
that they are insolent and abusive to soldiers ^ho have endured the 
hardships and perils of war, and many of whom are crippled by 
wounds or disease and are entitled to protection. He fears that as 
the only disability put upon deserters' is disfranchisement by the 
United States Government, and as each State regulates the qualifica- 
tion of its own voters, they will have the right to vote under existing 
State laws. He asks permission to appoint suitable persons as dep- 
uty marshals to assist in executing the laws in his district. 

Colonel Littler states that the same complaints of deserters return- 
ing and taunting soldiers who have lost limbs in service are made 
from all parts of the State, but are more numerous from the Fourth 
and Fifth Districts, and asks instructions as to committing deserters 
and payment of expenses. The majority of those lately arrested have 
been discharged by orders from headquarters Department of the 
East, with foKeiture of pay and allowances. 

Stephen Miller, Grovemor of Minnesota, August 19, 1865, states 
that he learns from good citizens that many of the poltroons who fled 
from Minnesota to Canada and elsewhere either prior to or immedi- 
ately subsequent to the draft to avoid military duty are now return- 
ing, and as they should in some way be held to a strict accountability 
for their infamous conduct, he hopes the War Department will take 
the matter in hand, as the laws of Minnesota make no provision for 
their punishment. 

Brig. Gen. E. W. Hinks, Harrisburg, Pa., June 9, 18G5, refers com- 
munication from provost-marshal Eighteenth District, Pa., represent- 



UNION AUTHORITIB8. Ill 

ing that a large number of deserters who had previously absconded 
are now returning; requests to be informed if it is the desire of the 
Gk>vemment to imJce special efforts for the arrest of deserters. 

Lieut. CoL William N. Grier, Harrisburg, Pa., July 3, 1866, refers 
communication from provost-marshal Twentieth District, Pa., in 
reference to the number of deserters at large, and his inability, under 
the present arrangements, to arrest them. 

Lieut. Col. William N. Grier, acting assistant provost-marshal- 
general for Harrisburg, Pa., August 24, 1865, forwards a communica- 
tion from Capt. J. W. Kirker, provost-marshal Twenty-third District 
of Pennsylvania, who suggests the propriety of restoring the reward 
for the arrest of deserters and non-reporting drafted men, so that the 
assistanoe of civil officers and citizens may be obtained to apprehend 
and arrest this class of criminals, the deputy provostrmarshals and 
special officers having been discharged. 

Bvt. Brig. Gen. James Oakes, acting assistant provost-marshal- 
general for Illinois, forwards for instructions a communication from 
Capt. William H. Collins, provost-marshal Twelfth District of Illinois, 
who states that a number of deserters from the Army and the draft 
are reported to be within the limits of his district. Under existing 
arrangements, without guards, or rewards to secure the co-operation 
of citizens, he is iK>werless to make arrests, although good men inform 
him in regard to this class of pei'sons, and asks that the Government 
punish them, in justice to those who have not evaded service ; suggests 
that measures be taken to make the records of his offices permanently 
accessible to every county in the district, to prevent deserters from 
voting, and requests information on this point from the proper author- 
ities. Creneral Oakes says the preparation of a record of deserters for 
each county, as suggested by Captain Collins, would, if possible to be 
done at all with sufficient fullness and accuracy as to be of practical 
value for the purpose designated, be a work requiring much time and 
labor. He suggests that printed lists of deserters be prepared from the 
records of each district. 

Lieut. Col. Charles S. Lovell, Madison, Wis., May 6, 1865, refers 
communication relative to the state of affairs in the town of Benton, 
Lafayette County, which is infested with disloyal men and returned 
deserters. The provost-marshal Third District of Wisconsin says 
the town has been in open rebellion against the Government since the 
war broke out, and that this is the second time he has been called 
upon for aid, but is unable to do anything in the matter, owing to the 
discharge of the special officers. 

Brig. Gen. T. G. Pitcher, Indianapolis, Ind., July 3, 1865, refers 
communication with regard to returning deserters from the draft, and 
asks if it is desirable to arrest them; if so, suggests that provost- 
marshal be authorized to employ one deputy special agent for that 
purpose. 

Brig. Gen. T. G. Pitcher, Indianapolis, Ind., July 20, 1865, refers for 
instructions communication from provost-marshal Sixth District of 
Indiana, stating that several deserters from the draft have returned 
from Canada, and asking if he shall arrest them, and if so, what dis- 
position shall be made of them. 

Bvt. Maj. WUliam Silvey, Concord, N. H., May 31, 1865, says he is 
almost daily receiving information concerning the presence, in various 
places in the State, of deserters, and having no deputies or special 
agents, desires to know in what manner the arrest of these men is to 
be accomplished. 



112 



COUBESPONDEMCB, ETC. 



Col. James A. Wilcox, Columbus, Ohio, August 5, 1865: Relative to 
arresting deserters from the diaft, their assignment, and urging that 
some reasonable reward be allowed to facilitate arrests. ♦ ♦ ♦ 

Maj. George £. Scott, Veteran Reserve Corps, August 28, 1865, for- 
wards an extract from the report of Capt. A. D. Bean, provost-marshal 
Fifth District of Maine, of August 20, recommending that a list of 
absentees and deserters from the several drafts be furnished to the 
municipal authorities of the towns in his district for the purpose of 
enforcing the provisions of section 21 of act of Congress approved 
March 3, 1865, disfranchising deserters. 



Exhibit of volunteers and militia mustered into the U. S. service from November 
i, 1SG4, to April 13, 1865, the date tchen recruiting of troops by voluntary en- 
listmentH was stopped. 









Kttw orgiuiisatious. 


SUto. 


3-years. 




2 years. 


1-year. 


/ 


! 


6 

-«1 


1 


! 


t 

< 


1 


I 


















1 


I)eUw»i« 


\ I 




i 






i 


I 8 


Ulinois 


f.... 












::::::::i:::::::: 


Indiana 


\ 171 ' 

/ 




10 






14, M2 





Iowa 


\ 2; 

/ 










is, 781 




la 


Kansas 


I 

/ 


68 

6 
255 










1 


Kentnck V 


\ ' 

/ 3.211 I 159 
\ L'02 1 4 
f 


"'"5i9 




2 


93* 

1.857 


6 


Maine 


53 








IKnrvlanA 


\ 535 

/ 




"1 




2,373 
23 
209 






1 ' 10 

/ 


i 


1 




ai 


MaaaaehnaetU 


\ 391 1 82 
/ 


144 








1.493 


807 1 1 


Iflohiran 












\ 3 

f 










809 




Minnesota 


{ 2 
/ 117 
i 37 
f 25 
\ 7 
/ 












047 

101 

2.123 


:.. 1,189 


Missouri 














i 













STow Hampahlre 












a 


s 


If ow Jorsey 














WewTork 


I 

\ 2,862 

r I 

\ 26 

{ iS 
/ 


ie' 










io 

40 

1.750 


7* 

615 




Ohio .... 






61 














io 

3 




a 

3 


i4,478 
090 

a. 007 







Pennsylvania 












Bhotle Island 
















VcmiiMtt 


\ 

/ 


:::::::: 






1 85 








::::::::i::::::: :::::::: 








aoi 




West Virginia 


{:::::::::::.:::: 


1..::....! 




I 

28 
6.881 






UrtsMAVkalM 


/ 


i:::: 








BiatrietorColnmbUa 


\ lai' 

f 


3| 301 
1 








00 


{ ' :.. 










2 






















r a.4ft7 


175 
97 


813 
154 


522 
900 




4 1 970 
3 ' (U.570 


7 
I.5U 




Grsndtotal,..^ i'sTo 




i.aTs 













aUp(oMaroli81,1805. 



UNION AUTHORITIES. 113 

Erttibit of rtHnnteem and militia mustered into the U. S, service, Ac, — Ck>ntinaed. 













Old reglmenta 


. 






Unaaaiffiiad. 




State. 


S-yaan. 


2- 


yeara. 




l-year. 




i 


t 


Total 
Bta^M. 




1 


1 


< 


a 

1 


! 


< 


1 

5 ' 


1 


1 

1 

< 




{ 

{ 
{ 
{ 
{ 

{: 
{ 
{ 
{ 
{• 


77 

eee 

1 

14 
89 
5 
9 
1 
3 
2 
11 


t 


8 
17 

89 
282 

493 
82 
11 






1 


}x.« 

100 


CbDoaetioot 


874 


993 






10 
15 

"i'M 


1 


1 


Delaware 




..... 








1 
110 


"V 


11 
14 






74 
343 


]'» 




miaola 


u 


I 


} 23, 430 






87 
380 




ladiaiia.. 


7 


2 








318 


888 


7 


} 17,875 












Iffwa 


2 


1 


1 
1 
1 


5 


.... 


821 

""in 


14 
5 

1 


...!.. '"'8 


} *^ 


Kanaaa 


123 


5 


10 


.... 




\ 475 








KcBtoeky 




8 

I 
17 
















803 i..::.. 


} 8,087 




11 
139 
32 
7 
9 
828 


:::::: :::: 






8 
818 
130 
790 








Matae 


12 


8 

2 

108 


3 


1 


89 


50 


88 1 


} 4,318 


HMtjUad 


2 








50 





24 


} 1.518 












410 


350 


10 


8 


4 


806 

08 

8,052 

185 
84 
254 


173 


358 




} 5,886 




i 




MkUgaa 

IfiniUMnfa 


104 


63 







2 


.... 


1.770 


8 


::::::r "2 

1 5 


} 8,006 
} 3.883 




{ 
{ 
{ 
{ 
{ 
k 
{■ 
{ 

/ 

\ 

{• 
{ 


...... 

15 


8 




1 


2 


.... 


209 


101 




••i82- 
3,400 




715 


84 




10 


2 


25 


88 


77 


}58.V4 




252 

88 

529 

128 

2.897 

8 

69 

U 

463 


101 


47 


1 






889 

82 

2.081 

40 

1.759 

:S2 

2,292 

81 

4.827 


112 


87 




} 981 


Timm T..- ^ 










} 2,834 


v^—, ir -—t 


25 

10 

1.708 

1 
18 


a 

"292* 


4 
10 
80 


1 


1 


43 


4 




3 

97 

608 

8 

187 

2,486 




54 


21 


871 


176 


2 


} 18.829 


PcaaaylTaAia 


5 


72 

1 
4 





1 


2.095 


127 


21 


1 20,014 


857 


23 


13 


.... 


2.533 


78 

8 

844 


3.086 


} 18,806 


Rhode Island 

WW 


81 

8 

107 

4 
4 


89 


101 


5 


4 


8 


240 

5 

085 

29 

877 


187 




1 


} 1,074 


TflcBtont 

WaitViiglnIa 


39 


5 


4 




2 


8 


5 




8 


} 1.018 


12 






4 


.... 


860 


3 






} 1.588 


VtuMHialn 










} 8.020 


DiatrictofColnmbiaa 


19 
4 



4 






i 


.... 


985 
20 
5 


338 


8 


28 


1 
















8 




} ^ 






















{ 


840 
1,888 


19 

4.182 


i;iM* 


82 
871 






1.408 
38,810 


"i8;8»" 


82 
1,880 


i:i6i- 


845 
5,334 


}l45.528 


Grand total... 


185 


88 



aUptolIaroh81. 1885. 



5 630 iafaatry and 20 oaralry for 20 months not inoladad. 



[Hon.— The first Ifne of llgnrM inclosed in braces indicates colored troops; the second Une repra- 
senU while troops. In the original the flgnrea for colored troops appear in red ink.] 

KECAPITULATION. 



Three-yean 

Two-yeare 

One-year 

Tliree-yean 

Two-years , 

ODe>year 

8 R R— SERIES in, VOL V 



Old 



White. 


Colored* 


Total 


4.881 

809 

07.896 


MS 

977 


8.508 

1.085 
08,875 


42,081 


414 

1.589 


12,099 

574 

48.880 



gste. 



gste. 



I 77,970 



56,298 



114 



CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. 

KliCAPlTl LATION-Cuutimuil. 



Win to. Colored. TotMl. 



1 Agm- 
gata. 



Unauifnietl : 

New 

Old 



3.9IK) 
5, 334 



1,106 
845 



5.075 
fi,179 



Grand toUl 1 145,523 

^ I I 

Note. — I am quite sure that some recruits for colored regiments 
we 1X3 not, as the regulations direct, reported to the chief mustering 
offic(»rs of the States, and therefore some do not appear on this exhibit. 
To <*<)rrect this I have directed the chief of the Bureau for Colored 
Troops to report direct to you the number mustered. Should his 
number exceed those herein, the excess should be added to my totals. 
I have omitted from this the mustere from rebel States, as they will 
be furnished in the report above referred to. 

THOMAS M. VINCENT, 

Assustif u t Adjutan t-Oen eral. 
War Department, Adjutaxt-(4eneral's Office, 

Septeinber IS, lSt}6, 

Exhibit of till' nnntherof troops — volnuteern {white and colored) aiidregidars — that 
rrill rcwnin in scrrirr a/fcr the musters ovf. as already. ordered, shall have been 
compk'tt'd.d 



Deiiartoient. 



For the orders directing re- 
I dnctions to the nambera 
belovr enomeimted, 8«« Cir- 
culars Kofi. 22, 26, 28, 30. 31, 
35. 39. 41, and 44, Acyutut- 
Genersl's Office, 1805. 



White. ! Colored. Totel. 



Middle 

Wsshiogton. 
Ohio. 



Kentucky . 
Missouri . . 



VlrRlnia. 
North Carol! UH. 
South Caroliiiu 

(toorifia 

MiASiANippi 

Arkansas 



Alabama . 



FloritU..-, 
Louisiana . 
Texas 



Teiiu©H»«'. 




Cslifornia . 
C»lnnil>iu.. 



2.000 


1«,000 
4.000 






12.000 






rj, 030 





Total I 143,532 i 83,070 



3.999 
7,026 
0.000 
5,173 
10,106 
11.400 
18,483 
7,046 
10,852 
17,165 
14,306 
8,282 



17,095 
7,229 
23,516 
83.363 



14.000 
12,030 



226,611 



a'By the 1st of October the muster ont of R.-'iOB white troops in the Department 
of Washinprton and 24,200 colored in other departments should be (-omuleted, and 
then the forces in the resixjctivo dopartmentvS. except Missomi and Alaoama, will 



UNION AUTHORITIES. 115 

Since the foregoing was made up Greneral Sheridan, by telegi*aph of 
September 21, reports the following numbers (approximate) of white 
troops ordered mnst'^i'e<l out : 

Texas ... 7,500 

Louisiana 2,000 

Florida 800 



Total- 10,800 

Thus left remaining 216, 811 

THOMAS M. VINCENT, 

Assistant Adjutant- General. 
War Department, Adjutant-(4eneral's Office, 

September U, 1865. 



State of Ohio, Executive Department, 

ColumbiLSj September 16, 1866, 
Hon. E. M. Stanton, 

Secretary of War, Washinyion, D. C: 

Sir: We have had, and are almost daily receiving in various forms, 
a great number of petitions and complaints from our volunteers 
against their detention in the service. 

Passing without comment tlieir murmuring as to their food, expo- 
sures, diseases, &c., as being in fact unavoidable incidents to all 
military service, and perhaps in habit of all volunteer soldierings, I 
beg leave in accordance with ]*epeated promises to them thus to caU 
the attention of the Department and of the President to their case. 

They complain bitterly, not only against their detention in the 
service as a matter of right on the part of the National Government, 
or of duty and obligation upon theirs as a class, but also on account 
of their own special and peculiar calamity in being thus kept in an 
arduous and painful service, wholly unanticipated by them, whilst 
their friends and late comrades have been discharged and are living 
happy and useful at home. Of course the latter complaint (derived 
from a comparison of their fortunes with those of others), though 
natural enough, can constitute by itself no sound reason for .their 
dischai^ge — since in any army it may well become the policy and duty 
of the Government to discharge one part before another and before 
their legal term may have expired. 

But after all the consideration I can give this case and the ques- 
tions which underlie it, it does seem to me that their first, the general 
complaint, that all and any of the volunteers who are detained beyond 
the period of actual war and the time necessary in the mere processes 
of their discharge are unlawfully and unjustly detained, is well 
founded. I can see no legal authority in keeping up that army or any 
part of it for any other service or services than those specified in the 
laws and in the proclamations of the President. And it seems to me, 
too, that the proceeding is inequitable and hard in its operation, and 
it is unlawful; and this wholly irrespective of the question w^hether 
the other ends of detaining them shall be good, wise, and practicable, 
or the contrary. These were not a part of their obligations and duties 
when they enlisted in contemplation of either party, probably, and 

stand as indicated by the figures herein. Missouri, General Pope reports, will be 
oomi>Ieted by October 15. General Thomas has ordered five regiments of black 
troops, say 4,000, from Department of Tennessee to Department of Alabama to 
rpplace an eqnal nnmbor of white trooiw in that department with view to their 
mtirttT ont. Tlie white troops tlins relieved should be mustered out by October 10. 



116 



COBBESPONDENCE, ETC. 



certainly not of the volunteers. And assuredly the class of citizens 
who so enlisted (whether we jndge them by their individual worth, or 
by the cause in which they i)eriled their all, or by the services they 
have i)erformed) is not a class that deserves illegal, harsh, or even 
doubtful estimate or treatment at the hands of the Nation they have 
saved. 

Doubtless you have considered all these and more like matters in 
this connection. I know, too, the infinite embarrassments of mere 
detail as well as of the complicated questions of principle which beset 
an administration or department in the closing of a war so stupendous 
as this, and therefore I would neither show nor encourage in others 
a spirit of fault-finding and impatience. Nevertheless, whilst so fre- 
quently implored to endeavor to rescue them from what I myself do 
believe to be an unjust and undeserved hardship, and yet acquiesc- 
ing in the propriety of your request that the State Executive should 
not add to your embarrassments by transmitting special complaints 
and applications for discharge, I have thought it to be my official duty 
thus to present my reasons in behalf of the ri^ht of all to their dis- 
charge at the close of hostilities. If, as is possible, these opinions as 
to the law and justice of the case agree with those of the Department 
this communication may do good by its urgency of more dispatch in 
the process of discharging them. If, as is probable, they may be in 
some essential particular in conflict with those of the national autliori- 
ties, then I respectfully beg leave to ask for them such a considera- 
tion or reconsideration as the rights and merits of these volunteers 
and my own strength and sincerity of convictions deserve. 
Very respectfully, 

CHARLES ANDERSON, 

Oovemor of Ohio. 



Exhibit showing the number of colored recruite enlisted in the service of the United 
States, for old and new regiments, where enlisted, and where credited, from 
November 1, I8O4, to date in lS65y when enlistments ceased. 



State. 


3 
< 


1 


1 




1 


S 


O 


1 
a 


^ 


i 

5 


J 


1 


^ 

5 


1 


3 

1 




1 


AlabMna 


1 nTo 




...I..J 

1 


1 i 1 


;] ■ 


1 


]] 


ArkAnfMM ' . | 17? 


...L... 




Connecticut ' 1.... 


77 




i 




""J. lyy 




Delaware ' .- 


34 






..::-.. I..:: 


„-,..i.:-. 


1 




District of Columbia 
Florida 







1 

7 

181 


183 





1 








] 






1 






8 










4 






Georida 








2.170 


1 










lu 


Ullnois 






530 




...1.... 






-- J.... 




Indiana 




1 


187 








i • 




Iowa 




' ' 1 ( 




20 














Kanaan 




1 1 1 






\n 












Kentucky 




••••| )■■• 








*,9oe 












I^niaiana ' 


\\\'\\'.'.':'\'.'\'Vy.\\'.\\ 








828 1 


.... 






Maine 








1 








3S 


.... 


Maryland .J 




....'....■ 1 




' 






'"' 


5fn 




.... 


Maasachnsetts * 




1 1 


1 .. . 


1 






1 




155 




Michigan 1 




1 ' .. 




1 












tM 


Minnenota 








IV 
















MiMlMiuui ' 








18 
2 






* 


ig 






754 


.... 


MiasourTr. 1 










' 








.... 


New Hampshire 1 






















New Jemey 1 


::::::::i:::; 




...J 


..<,i 




,,,^ 




••«> 




«••• 



UNION AUTHOBITIES. 



117 



EMbit showing the number of colored rtcruiiM enlitted in the urviee of tJte United 
States, <fto.— Contmned. 



%i 



i I 



I 



New York 

MorthCnoUiui.. 



Ohio. 
PnoaylTattto 



27.... 




863 



123 



WMtVlrgiala 



Total Bambor 
oredited. 



2,»72 190 7711 

I 



IM 



2,m 



M6 



188 20 



178 



11 



1* 

iL.. 



.3: 



12, 2j 871 



8,020 814 70 805 1.306 107 



SUta. 



t 



k\ak\mm% 

▲rkmnsaa.... 
CoBBoeticni. . 
Delaware . 



Diatriet of ColnrnMa 
Florid*. 



Gootfia. 

huboU.. 



Iowa. 



Kentucky. 
Loniaiana. . 
MaiBO. 



MaiTlaiid 

Haaaacfanaotta. 
Mlchigai 



sssa?*.: 



HowHampahire 

Kew Jeraoy 

NewYork. 

North CaioUna 

Ohio I. 

FenaaTlTanfa i. 

KhodelaUad 

Sonth Caroliiia 

Vennoot 

Vtrglvia 

Wiaoonafn 

WertYirgfiiU 



501 



Total nnmbcr 
ereditod... . 25^531 



1,083 



I 



':•• 



81 



1.083; 82 

I 



8811. 



100. 



43 



416 

248 1,870, 



805 



1,773 1,385700 



774 



1,067 



!858 



2.443 



10 6. 



1.062 65 858 



%448 



I 
! 

3 

&_ 

2.088 

172 

77 

84 

178 

10 

2,707 

530 

187 

20 

178 

5,010 

850 

86 

563 

138 

168 

25 

1,412 

1.085 

81 

262 

416 

1.781 

774 

1.067 

60 

2.015 

2,407 

1 

715 

28 

88 



26 8326.061 



THOMAS M. VINCENT. 

Assistant Adjutcmi-OeneraU 
War Drpahtment, Ai>jutant-Gbnkral'& Offics, 

September tO, 1866. 



118 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. 

[September 28, 1865.— For report of Bvt. Maj. Gen. Rufus Ingalls, 
U. S. Army, chief quartermaster of Armies operating against Rich- 
mond, of operations during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1865, see 
Series I, Vol. LI, Part I, p. 251.] 



Washington, D. C, October 5, 186S. 
Hon. Edwin M. Stanton, 

Secretary of War: 

Sir: Your special instructions to me dated March 25, 1863, require 
that I should proceed to the Mississippi River and inspect the troops 
operating in the field against the rebel forces, to examine int/O all 
operations in cotton connected with the troops, and to announce to 
the army the policy of the General Government respecting the negro 
race held in bondage in the States in rebellion. 

I reported to you from time to time the condition of the troops and 
their determination to meet and beat the enemy. On the 23d of June 
I reported to you in relation to operations in cotton, showing what 
frauds I had detected, and the difficulties I had to contend with in 
obtaining correct information whereby the guilty persons might be 
brought to trial. My operations in this respect were of little practical 
value, and I only excited opposition; and I discovered that this oppo- 
sition acted injuriously upon the third and most important part of 
my duties — ^your instructions respecting the blacks. The present 
report is intended to give the results in the organization of colored 
troops. You undoubtedly recollect that the determination to send 
me on this duty was a sudden one, and the purpose was only unfolded 
to me the day prior to the date of the instructions, and you urged 
expedition in the matter. The subject was new to me, and I entered 
ux>on the duty by no means certain of what I might be able to effect. 
Still, as more of my military service was performed in the slave States, 
and I was perfectly familiar with plantation life — I felt that I knew 
the peculiarities of the colored race— I could, with the blessing of 
Divine Providence, at least do something to alleviate the condition 
of the numerous thousands who would come within our military lines 
for protection. 

At Cairo, 111., I first came in contact with what were then called 
contrabands — over 1,500 men, women, and children huddled together 
in insufficient quarters, the helpless drawing rations from the Govern- 
ment, and the able-bodied men employed in the various departments 
of the Government as laborers to the extent they were required. 
Comx)ensation, $10 per month and one ration per day. I found the 
mortality of the place had been very great, esi)ecially among the 
children — m*easles, diarrhea, and pneumonia being the prevailing 
diseases — ^and this subsequently I found to be the case at all other 
points visitM by me where large numbers were collected. Cairo was 
not a proper place for them, and they were soon removed to Island No. 
10, in the Mississippi River, below this place. March 20 I reviewed 
the troops and announced to some extent the policy of the Govern- 
ment, and having up to the 1st of April carefully considered the whole 
subject, I on that day communicated to you my views. These views 
were subsequently enlarged as I came in more immediate contact with 
large bodies of troops and thousands of negroes. With but very few 
ox(>eptions I had the troops paraded, and after a review had them 
brought together in mass and announced the purpose of my mission. 



UNION AUTHORITIES. 119 

I then requested the body of the troops to call on such of their com- 
manders as they might desire to make an address on the policy I had 
annoanced. In this way the views and opinions of man}' general and 
other officers were communicated directly to the troops. With a 
single exception (the regiment from Chicago, 111.) the policy was 
most enthusiastically received by the troops. /Die prejudice against 
colored troops was quite general, and it required in the first instance 
all my efforts to counteract it; but finally it was overcome, and the 
blacks themselves subsequently by their coolness and determination 
in battle fought themselves into their present high standing as 
soldiers. 

I found the treatment of the blacks varied very materially at the d i ffer- 
ent military stations and by the operating columns. Some command- 
ers received them gladly, others indifferently, whilst in very many 
cases they were refused admission within our lines and driven off by 
the pickets. They were thus obliged in numerous cases to return into 
shivery. This resulted from the fact that no policy in regard to them 
had been made known, but as soon as I had announced by your 
authority the views of the President and yourself, all opposition to 
their reception ceased. In this connection I may state that the gen- 
eraHn-chief of these armies (Lieutenant-General Grant) earl}' took 
steps to provide for the welfare of this unfortunate race, and detailed 
humane clerg3'men as superintendents of contrabands to see to their 
welfare. The general on all occasions gave me his hearty support, 
and was ever ready to second my views. The policy, as I announced 
it, was that all officers and enlisted men were required to treat the 
blacks kindly and encourage their seeking the protection of the troops, 
to be fed and clothe<l as far as possible until they could be able to 
provide for themselves; the able-bodied men to be organized into regi- 
ments, except such laborer as were required in the several staff corps 
and departments— cooks for the troops and servants for the officers. 
I also distinctly announced that if any officer should stand in the way 
or oppose this policy I would not hesitate to dismiss him from the 
service of the United States. 

April 2 I addressed the troops at Columbus, Ky. April 4 explained 
the plan to Major-General Hurlbut, commanding at Memphis, Tenn., 
and at his request authorized him to raise six companies of artillerists 
to man the heavy guns in position at that place; also to organize 
contrabands for work in the Quartermaster's Department. April H 
addressed some 7,000 troops at Helena, Ark., commanded by Major- 
General Prentiss. April 9 addressed Generals McArthur's and 
Ix^an's divisions, of Major-General McPhei-son's cori>s. April 12, at 
Milliken's Bend, La., joined the headquarter of the commanding gen- 
eral (Lieutenant -General Grant). At this time, as we had possession 
of the west bank of the Mississippi River, and could collect the 
negroes, I liecame satisfied that 20,(XK) troops could be organize<l if 
necessary, and fti-st made :\rrangementA for 10,000 and afterward for 
another 10,0CX). In cases where I could not personally visit troops 
operating at a distance I invariably made known to the generals in 
command by communications what was desired, and urged upon them 
the utmost zeal in carrying out the policy of tlie Government. In 
regard to officering these regiments, I authorized commanding generals 
of corps and divisions to assemble boards of officei*s to examine appli- 
cants desiring commissions, and to be particularl}' careful to select 
none but those whose hearts were in the work, and Vho would devot<^ 
themselves to elevate the blacks and endeavor to early bring them 



120 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. 

into a high state of discipline. These generals were then desired to 
famish rosters for regiments on which I would issue appointments 
and give the necessary authority to raise the troops. I also authorized 
the nrst sergeants of companies to be whites, but I soon found that 
soldiers only took these positions to obtain promotion, and if not 
made in a very short time dissatisfaction was the consequence. I 
therefore changed the 'rule and urged colonels to select intelligent 
blacks and instruct them. This system worked admirably, and I 
have seen colored sergeants drill their squads as well as white ser- 
geants could. The best class of officers, as a general thing, did not 
offer themselves, owing to the prejudice existing against colored 
troops and a number merely wanted higher positions; still, some good 
and zealous officers were obtained. Afterward, when the prejudice 
against this species of troops had been overcome, a higher class of 
officers presented themselves, and in larger numbers than could be 
appointed. By means also of frequent inspections by myself and two 
officers of my staff, the careless and indifferent officers were gotten 
rid of and more zealous ones appointed. 

I remained with the troops until they crossed the Mississippi River 
at Bruinsburg, Miss., May 1, and afterward visited the army on the 
Big Black River May 5, and then returned up the river to Memphis, 
Tenn., to visit the corps of Major-General Hurlbut. Visited the jwr- 
tions of his corps as far as Corinth by a circuitous route by railroad 
of some 160 miles, and addressed the troops at seven different stations 
on the first day, twice co the troops and contrabands at Corinth sec- 
ond day, and to the troops at six different stations on the third day, 
returning to Memphis. The weather was excessively hot, and the 
exposure and exertion, together with previous exposure, prostrated 
me with sickness, and I was ordered by my physician to leave the 
country. After several days of sickness at Memphis I proceeded to 
Louisville, Ky., where I was compelled to remain in hospital over two 
weeks. Before leaving Louisville (June 13) I authorized Col. William 
A. Pile to raise troops under my instructions in the State of Missouri. 
He rendered good service, and was subsequently rewarded by the 
appointment of brigadier-general. Also, June 15 I addressed a com- 
munication to Major-General Rosecrans, commanding Department of 
the Cumberland, at Murfreesborough, Tenn., and urged him to carry 
out the views of the Government, which I fully set forth to him. 

August 2, having measurably recovered my health, I left for the 
Southwest, and at Cincinnati, Ohio, August 5, authorized Major-Gen- 
eral Burnside, commanding Department of the Ohio, on his entering 
Tennessee, to organize colored troops. Likewise gave similar author- 
ity to Major-General Schofield, who was about starting on an expedi- 
tion into Arkansas. After the fall of Vicksburg I accompanied the 
commanding general to New Orleans, La., to organize troops in the 
Department of the Gulf, commanded by Major-General Banks. I 
found, however, that the regiments of the C^rps d'Afrique, twenty- 
nine in number, had been organized on the basis of 500, and, except 
to authorize one regiment of cavalry, I directed that the regiments 
should be filled up to the maximum standard of 1,000 before other 
regiments would be authorized. This will account for there being no 
additional regiments raised in that department except the one referred 
to. The recruits obtained now brought these regiments up to that 
standard. Maj. George L. Stearns, assistant adjutant-general, having 
been ordered to Nashville, Tenn., to superintend the organization of 
colored troops, reported to me. I found that he entered into the 
duty with great zeal and rendered good service. 



UNION AUTHORITIES. 121 

In the middle of December I was compelled to leave the Mississippi 
River in consequence of sickness. The year's ox)erations may be 
summed up as follows: 



Infiimiitof cavalry 

iregiiDeats of bea\*y artillery. 
4 btttcriM of lijrht artillery. . . 

Mniiaeiitoof mfantry 

liB^peadent company 

Total 



22 

151 

11 

745 

3 



-a 



390 

3,95« 

885 

15,767 

93 



20,591 



I 



412 
4,107 



16,512 
96 



21,523 



Tho ;U)«>vo numliei's ai-e taken from returns in the Adjutant- 
General's Office, and are below the number actually enlisted, as the 
loss in battle, by death, and by desertion could not have been less than 
5,000. This may seem a large estimate, but it is known that raw 
troops early contract disease, especially the measles, and it is further 
known that when the blacks become sick, not having the vitality of 
the white race, they sink under disease, and the percentage of mor- 
tality is very great. The able-bodied men were largely employed in 
the several staff departments, especially at the principal depots; also 
by the troops themselves as cooks and servants, and some commanders 
organized them into pioneer parties without being mustered into the 
service of the United States. Many, induced by high wages, took 
employment on the transports; others, again, readily found employ- 
ment as wood-choppers, also as laborers in the towns on the river. 
Admiral Porter stated to me that in the naval fleet under his command 
he had 1,000 negroes. I state these facts to show why a larger num- 
ber of colored men were not enlisted. 

Col. A. Cummings, Nineteenth Regiment Pennsylvania Cavalry, 
by your directions, reported to me in Philadelphia January 4, 1864, 
for duty, and I ordered him to Little Rock, Ark., to superintend the 
recruiting service in that State. He exerted himself, but as the 
negroes had to a great extent been sent to Texas, comparatively few 
vere obtained; still, some regiments were organized. He was sub- 
J^equently made a brigadier-general. 

While at Louisville, Ky., in the month of January, 1864, I satisfied 
myself that from 5,000 to 7,000 negroes of Kentucky had passed the 
border of that State into Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, and Tennessee, and 
that many of them had enlisted into various organizations, some into 
^ments being raised in the Eastern States; also that the entire 
slave population of the State was in a state of ferment. This 
induecil me to proceed to Frankfort, the capital, to present my views 
to Governor Bramlette. This I did, and fully set forth my opinions, 
urging them with what ability I possessed. I represented that slavery 
*as forever at an end, to which the Governor assented, and that as 
^be negroes were constantly passing the borders of the State, and it 
could not be prevented, I urged that 1 might take the able-bodied 
Dienand organize ihem into troops, whereby the owners of the negroes 
'oold receive certificates of their muster and the State receive credit 
on the quota for the draft. The Governor, while generally assenting 
foniy positions, ui-ged that I would not establish recruiting stations 
in the State, but desist from my purpose, stating that the subject was 



122 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. 

one of peculiar delicacy to the people of Kentucky; that they did not 
desire the General Government to interfere, and that as they desired to 
manage the institution in their own way, he especially deprecated 
any agitation at that time, stating, also, that Kentucky would come 
up to the measure of her duty in this respect, and by legal enactment 
provide for the extinction of slavery. I remarked that under their 
present laws some four or five years would be necessary to fully 
accomplish this measure. I conversed with most, and perhaps nearly, 
all the members of the Legislature, which was then in session, all of 
whom took the ground advocated by the Governor, and some of them 
even requested that I should remove my recruiting stations in Ten- 
nessee on the borders of Kentucky to a distance, which of course I 
refused to do. Finding this feeling so prevalent in the State, I with- 
drew from it without then doing anything. My action in this case I 
reported to you from Louisville under date of February 1. The first 
recruiting in Kentucky commenced at Paducah under Second Lieut. 
J. Cunningham, Second Illinois Artillery, in February, pursuant to 
a request made to you by the member of Congress from the First 
District, in which Paducah is situated. The lieutenant was author- 
ized to raise a regiment of artillery to mau the works at that place. 

Brigadier-General Chetlain reported to me, and I assigaed him as 
superintendent of the recruiting service in West Tennessee; after- 
ward in the entire State. He proved a most valuable officer, for I 
found him to possess intelligence and zeal, with a rare qualification for 
the organization of troops. He never failed on any duty to which he 
was assigned, either as a superintendent or as an inspector, to which 
latter duty I also assigned him, and I am gratified that he was subse- 
quently rewarded by the brevet of major-general. 

February 9, Major Stearns having relinquished his position in Ten- 
nessee as superintendent of the recruiting service, I appointed Capt. 
R. D. Mussey, who had acted as his assistant. The sux)erintendettt 
was subsequently made the colonel of the One hundredth Regiment of 
Colored Troops, and continued to perform the duties of superintend- 
ent until recruiting had ceased, and he rendered most efficient service. 
He, too, has been proi)erly rewarded by having conferred upon him 
the brevet of brigadier-general. 

Having returned to Louisville, Ky., in June, I became satisfied that 
the time had fully arrived for the organization of colored troops in 
that State, as the negroes were rapidly coming to our military sta- 
tions (my purpose of doing so I mentioned to you in Washington 
and received your verbal sanction). Accordingly the 13th of June, 
by my Order No. 20 of that date, I directed that recruiting should 
commence throughout the entire State, and designated a camp of 
reception in each Congressional district where the negroes would 
be raceived and organized into regiments. I designated Brigadier- 
General Chetlain as the superintendent, who entered upon the duty, 
and continued in its performance until July G, when he was relieved 
at the request of Major-General Burbridge, commanding in Kentucky, 
made both to you and myself, who desired the superintendence, as he 
had, as I well knew, taken special interest in this measure, advocat- 
ing it on all proper occasions, and with benefit to the service, as he 
was then the owner of many blacks. 

Under these circumstances it was perfectly proper that the change 
should be made, but I nevertheless regretted it, believing that his 
higher duties of commander in Kentucky would prevent his personal 
attention to the superintendency. The result proved as I had antici- 



UNION AUTHORITIES. 123 

pated, for he verj' soon (lelepite<l the cUities to another officer; fii*Ht 
to Lieutenant-Colonel Hammond, and afterward to C'olonel Brisbin, 
the latter of whom I placed at the head of the Fifth U. S. Colored 
Cavalry. The reports of these officers came to me through Major- 
General Barbridge, but they had nothing to do with the establishment 
of the system, but only carried out what had been ordered. 

At this time 1 found it next to impossible to obtain the necessary 
medical officers for the colored regiments. The grade of surgeon 
could readily be filled by the promotion of assistant surgeons of vol- 
unteers, but few, except an occasional contract medical officer, would 
take the position of assistant surgeon. As the sanitary condition of 
the meu required a greater number of medical officers, I ordered on 
the 8th of July Surg. B. W. Sargent, on my staff, to proceed to the 
Eastern States and endeavor to procure from the graduates of the 
medical schools as many physicians as possible, the number then 
i^uired being some 120. By his energy and activity he procured 
quite a number, who, having passed the medical board at Boston and 
elsewhere, were duly appointed, and the service was greatly benefited 
hy this measure. 

July 16 Brigadier-General Pile was relieved as superintendent in 
Missouri and assigned to duty in the field, and Brig. Gen. Thomas 
Ewing, jr., stationed at Saint Louis, was charged with the duty, who 
performed it satisfactorily and with ability. 

May 1, 1865, pursuant to your instructions, I directed the discon- 
tinuance of all recruiting of colored men in the Deparments of the 
Missouri and Arkansas and the Military Divisions of the Mississippi 
and West Mississippi, and also consolidated some of the incomplete 
regiments, thus discontinuing three regiments in Kentucky, one in 
Tennessee, and two in Arkansas. Before this order could be received 
by the troops oi)erating in the field three additional regiments were 
organized from the negroes gathered b}^ Major-General Wilson on his 
march through Georgia under the standing instructions, and these 
regiments were retained in service. 

Very many of the regiments were filled to the maximum standard, 
and others to the minimum of 800, when ordered to stations on the 
Mississippi River and elsewhere, or sent to the field; but as recruit- 
ing for them was continued, and nearly all received recruits after 
organization, it is proper to estimate their numbers at the maximum 
standard, up to which in mass they undoubtedly came. 

The whole of my oi)erations in the West and Southwest in the 
organization of colored troops may be given as follows: 



MtMonri 

1 rviuniciit of inrniitiy 36 

Keoloekv : 

5 regunentii of infantry 180 

3 r^oMntii of cavalry 84 

1 battery of Ukbtariillerr 5 

SxBgimcataofheaTyartUlrry 204 

Teancnee: 

laiMdnMntaofiiifaotrT 408 . 

3 baiteriCM of liffbt artillery IS ( 

3 regf menta «f heavy artillery 2<)4 I 

MiegtaMBUofinftatry mh [ ] 



•8 

1 


1 


1,000 


1,036 


6,000 

2,400 

100 

5,040 


5,180 

2,484 

105 

5,2U 


13,000 

SOO 

5,040 

4.000 


13,468 

315 

5,244 

14.504 



124 



C0BBE8P0NDENCE, ETC. 



Alnhamn : 

4 reifiments of infantrj' 

Georgia: 

8reciin«iitoof infuitiy 

liiMiMippi: 

Irei^iiMntofeaTalry 

2 regiDMBU of beary artillery 

6 regiment* of inCuitry 

Arkanaaa: 

1 battery of ligbt artillery. . . . 

6 regiments of infantry 

Louisiana: 

1 regiment of cavalry 

I batteriea of light artiUery . . 

1 regiment of heavy artUleiy . 

6 regimenta of inlhntry 

Total 



i 
§ 



1 



108 

42 
136 
216 



8.000 

1,200 
8,360 
6,000 



5 160 

180 I 5,000 

I 

42 i 1.200 

15 I 900 

68 1,680 

216 6.000 



2.804 76,040 



i 

I 



4.144 

8.106 

1,248 
8,406 
6.216 

105 
5.180 

1,242 

815 

1.748 

6,216 



78,844 



Two regiments v»cr3 organ izod in Kansas from negroes, I nnder- 
stood, obtained from Arkansas, though not under my superintendence. 

It may be proper to state that, while each State named above is 
credited with certain regiments, the men did not always come from 
there, and the companies of a regiment were sometimes made up in 
two different States. A regiment of 1,000 men was recruited at 
Evansville, Ind., from Kentucky negroes, and the latter State received 
credit for them on her quota of the draft. This regiment is not 
enumerated in the tabular statement. 





BECAPITULATION. 










Begiinents. 


1 


8 

e 


! 

< 


4 ivuinirntH (if rnvnlry 




168 

40 

612 

2,052 


*'25 

800 
15.120 
57,000 


4,068 


8 battf riee of liKht Httilh-rv .. 




840 


9 regiments of heavy Artillery 
67 reffiments of infanlrv ....... 


,. 


15,732 
50,052 








Total 


2.872 


77.720 


80,502 







I have the honor to bi% very reapectiullv, vonr obedient servant, 

' L. THOMAS, 

AdjiUant- Oeneral, 



General Orders, ) War Deit., Adjt. General's Office, 

No. 141. ) Washington, October 7, 1865. 

I. Commanding generals of military departments and districts will 
be allowed the following staff officer, and no others: 

Oenerals commanding military departments. — One assistant adju- 
tant-general, one assistant inspeotor-general, one chief quartennaster, 
one chief commissary of subsistence, one medical director, one judge- 
advocate, two aides-de-camp, to bo selected from officers of their 
commands. 



UNION AUTHORITIES. 125 

Oenerals commanding distrids, — ^Two aides-de-camp, to be selected 
from officers of their commands. 

n. Greneral officers without military command are not allowed 
aides-de-camp or other staff officers. 

m. All officers serving on the staff of general officers not incladed 
in the above allowance will be immediately relieved from snch duty. 
The officers of the regular and volunteer regiments so relieved will be 
ordered to join their regiments without delay, and the staff officers of 
volunteers will be ordered to their homes tO'rejport thence by letter 
to the Adjutant-General for instructions. 

By order of the Secretary of War: 

E. D. TOWNSEND, 
Assistant Acljutant- General. 



General Orders, ) War Dept., Adjt. General's Office, 

No. 146. f Washington^ October 9, 1866. 

The allowance of means of transportation at all pobts east of the 
Mississippi and immediately west of the Mississippi will be— 

For posts garrisoned by one company, and for every two companies 
at a post, one four-mule wagon. 

All other public animals, wagons, spring wagons, and ambulances 
will be immediately turned in and disposed of by the Quartermaster's 
Department. 
By command of Lieu tenant-General Grant: 

E. D. TOWNSEND, 
Assistant Ad^vJtanUOeneraL 



General Orders, | War Dept., Adjt. General's Office, 

No. 149. I Washington, October Uy 1866. 

Bt the President of the United States of America: 

a proclamation. 

Whereas, by a proclamation of the fifth day of Jtily» one thonisand eight hon- 
dred and sixty-four, the President of the united States, when civil war was 
flacpant, and when combinatioiui were in progress in Kentucky for the pnrpoae 
of indtniK insurgent raids into that State, directed that the proclamation sua- 
pending the privilege of the writ of habeas corpus should be made effectual hi 
Kentucky, and that martial law should be established there, and continue until 
said proclamation should be revoked or modified; and whereas, since then the 
danger from insur^Kent raids into Kentucky has substantially passed away: 

Now, therefore, be it known that I, Andrew Johnson, President of the United 
States, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution, do hereby 
declare {hat the said proclamation of the fifth day of July, one thousand eight 
hundred and sixty-four, shall be, and is hereby, modified in so far that maitial 
law shall be no longer in force in Kentucky from and after the date hereof. 

hi testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the 
United States to be affixed. 

Done at the city of Washington this twelfth day of October, in the year of 
our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-five, and of the Independence of 
the United States of America the ninetieth. 

L. 8.] ANDBBW JOHNSON. 

' the President: 

W. HUNTER, 
AeHng Secretary of State. 

By order of the President of the United States: 

E. D. TOWNSEND, 
Assistant AdjiUanUOeneroL 



fei 



126 C0KKB8P0NDENCE, ETC. 

General Orders, ) War Dbpt., Adjt. General's Office, 

No. 152. 5 Washington, October 17, 1865. 

Hereafter no person shall Iw arrested as a deserter for having failed 
to report under any draft, or for any other non-compliance with the 
enrollment act or the amendments thereto. Any and all persons of 
this class now held will be immediately discharged. 
By order of the Secretary of War: 

K. D. TOWNSEND, 
. l.s^- isfa nt A djuia n t- OeneruL 



Headquarters Armib:s of the Unffed States, 

Washington, October 20, 1865, 
Hon. E. M. Stanton, 

Secretary of War: 

Sir: I have the honor to submit the following report of the reduc- 
tion of the Army, and to make some suggestions for the reorganiza- 
tion of the Regular Army. The surremler of the rebel armies and the 
collapse of the rebellion rendered a large part of our military force 
unnecessary, and immediate steps were taken to i-educe it by stopping 
enlistments, discharging non-effectives, and the muster out of men 
and regiments whose terms of service expired before given dates. 

By the 1st of July, 18G5, the spirit in which the results of the war 
were accepted by the South was known. Already two months have 
passed without a collision of any importance between the soldiers of 
the rebel army returned to their homes and our troops. Everywhere 
submission was perfect, and all that was asked by them was permis- 
sion to resume the ordinary pui-suits of civil life. The reduction of 
the Army was now made by organizations, and (hiring the month of 
July the two most important armies in the country — that of the Poto- 
mac and of the Tennessee — returned to the people from whom they 
had come four years before. Since that time the reiluction of troops 
left in the Southern States Xo secure order and protect the freedmen 
in the liberty conferred on them has been gradually going on in pro- 
portion as continued quiet and good order have justi^ed it. 

On the 1st of May, 1805, the aggregate of the military force of the 
United States was 1,000,510 men.* On Octol)er 20th this had been 
reduced, as it is estimated, to 210,000, and further reductions are still 
being made. These mustera out were admirably conducted, 800,000 
men passing from the Anny to civil life so quietly that it was scarcely 
known, save by the welcomes to their liomes received by them. The 
oixiinary process was to muster out the regiments in the field or wher- 
ever they might l)e, transport them as organizations to the States from 
which they came, and there pay them off and dischai^^e them from 
service. 

The apprehensions felt by some, of disturbance and disorder at so 
vast a force being suddenly thrown upon the country to resume tlie 
occupations of civil life after having l^en so long absent from them, 
proved entirely unfounded, the soldiers showing by their conduct 
that devotion to their country in the field is no disqualification for 
devotion to it at homo. 

At the l)egiuning of the war our small Regular Army was barely 
adequate to protect our overland routes and our Indian frontier and 

♦But see Vol. IV, of thi« series, p. 128;J, for a later official compilation showing 
an aggregate of 1,052,038. 



UNION AUTHOBITIES. 127 

garrison onr sea-coast works. At its close we practically had no 
Indian frontier, as the mines of the Rocky Mountains had scattered 
settlements at numerous points along their slopes, and the force 
employed in protecting these settlements and the overland routes was 
doable that of the whole Regular Army at the beginning of the war. 
In view of the vast extent of our country, the recent hostile condition 
of a portion of it, with the possibility of future local disturbances 
arising from ill-feeling left by the war or the unsettled questions 
between the white and black races at the South, I am pf the opinion 
that a Regular Army of 80,000 men is needed, and would recommend 
the following legislation.* 

Very resi)ectfully, your obedient Horvant, 

IT. S. GRANT, 
Tjienieuant-Genend, 



Wak Departmknt, Adjutant-General's ofpick, 

Washmyton, October 20, 1806. 
Hon. Edwin M. Stanton, 

Secretary of War: 
Sir: I have the honor to submit the following reiwit of the oper- 
ations of this department for the past year : 

RECRUITING FOR THE REGULAR ARMY. 

From October 31, 1804, to October 1, 1805, the number of recruits 
enlisted, for all arms, is 10,555. (Statement A.) 

The recruiting service for the Regular Army is progressing favor- 
ably. The regiments suffered so severely in their many battles that 
they were left at the tennination of active hostilities, almost without 
exoeption, reduced to mere skeleton organizations. They have now 
been distributed to stations and are rapidly filling up, thus enabling 
the department to relieve volunteer regiments as fast as they can be 
transported to their homes and paid. 

There are two principal depots for the general recruiting service, 
one at Fort Columbus, New York Harbor, for infantry, and one at 
Carlisle Barracks, Pa., for mounted troops. The of&oers detailed 
from the several regiments for recruiting duty are stationed in such 
localities as give promise of success, and their recruits are sent in 
parties to the depots, whence they are forwarded to the regiments to 
which they may be assigned. Besides this, the several regiments 
recruit their own ranks, as far as practicable, from the country adja- 
cent to their posts. 

AUTHORIZED STRENGTH AND ORGANIZATION OF THE REGULAR ARMY. 

The authorized strength of tlie i-egular legimentw of the Army, 
siipiK)sing each company full, is as follows: 



Oftic«ra. Men, 



6ngiBMBUorcav»lry(7Seoni|NiiiiM) 204 I 7.M8 

SrcguMiiUorftitilleiyCMconipaniefl) 273 , 4,890 

10 rennenU ol iiifRDtry. single battalion (100 comiKiiiiM} 340 | 8,360 

9 rssnnenta of infantry , each 3 battalioua ol 8 curapaiiioa (216 compauiea) 093 < 21, 321 

ToUl 1,S70 I 41,819 



^-Remaixider of this letter (here omitted) relates to the reorganization of the 
Begalar Army. 



128 CORBE8PONDENCE, ETC. 

This calculation is made on the basis of forty-two privates to a 
company at all but frontier posts. The total strength, upon the bsusis 
of 100 enlisted men to a company, would be 1,570 officers, 45,751 men. 

By existing acts of Congress the strength of companies is limited 
to the following number of private soldiers: 

The ten old regiments of infantry and four old regiments of artil- 
lery — forty-two privates per company (act of August 23, 1842), except 
when serving on the Western frontier, or at remote and distant sta- 
tions, when the allowance is seventy-four privates per company. 
(Act June 17, 1850.) 

The nine new regiments of infantry, three battalions each of eight 
companies — eighty-two privates per company. (Act July 29, 1861.) 

Eight light artillery companies — sixty-four privates i)er company. 
(Act June 17, 1850.) 

Twelve companies of the Fifth Artillerj' — 122 privates per company. 
(Act July 29, 1861.) 

Six regiments of cavalry, each twelve companies — seventy-eight 
privates per company. (Act July 17, 1862.) 

There is no good reason for such dissimilarity in the several organ- 
izations, and much inconvenience really arises from it. A company 
of forty-two privates is not sufficient for the ordinary duties of a gar- 
rison, and 122 privates are not needed except for a battery of six 
pieces serving in the field. It is recommended that all companies of 
the Regular Army be allowed 100 enlisted men as the maximum 
standai^, leaving to the War Department to regulate the strength of 
companies within that limit as may be demanded by the nature of the 
service at the various stations. It is not probable that this maximum 
would often be reached, but emergencies sometimes arise when it 
becomes a matter of great importance, and also of economy, to have 
large companies instead of mere platoons for immediate active duty. 

STATIONS OF THE REGULAR ARMY. 

The following is the present disposition of the i-egular artillery 
regiments : 

SECOND U. 8. ARTILLERY. 

On the Pjicific coast. 

TH1UI> U. S. ARTILLERY. 

Fort Sullivan, Eastport, Me., one company. 

Foi-t Preble, Portland, Me., one company. 

Fort Constitution, Portsmouth, N. 11., one company. 

Fort Warren, Boston, Mass., the I'egimental headquarters and three 
fompanies. 

Fort Independence, Boston, Mass., one company. 

Fort Adams, Newjwrt, R. I., three companies. 

One light battery, C, Division of the Mississippi. 

Olio light battery, E, Department of North Carolina. 

Detachments from some of these companies will Ik? placed at the 
unfinished forts and batteries along the coast near their stations. 

FIRST U. 8. ARTILLERY. 

Fort Trumbull, New Ix)ndon, Cpnn., one company. 

Fort Schuyler, N. Y., throe companies. 

Foit Lafayette, New York Harbor, one comptiny. 



UNION AUTHORITISa 129 

Fort Hamilton, New York Harbor, the regimental headquarters and 
two companies. 

Fort Richmond and Batteries Hudson and Morton, New York Har- 
bor, two companies. 

Sandy Hook, N. J., one company. 



8siu|KSS:s:}^^^-"«'*'^««">'- 



FOURTH U. S. ABTILLERY. 

Fort Delaware, Del., two companies. 
Fort McHenry, Baltimore, Md., two companies. 
Fort Washington, Md., the regimental headquarters and one com- 
pany. 
Fort Foote, Md., one company. 
Forts around Washington, four companies. 

FIFTH U. 8. ABTILLBBY. 

Fort Monroe, Old Point Comfort, Va., the regimental headquarters 
and four companies. 

Fort Taylor, Key West, Fla., two companies. 

Fort Jefferson, Dry Tortugas, Fla., four companies. 

One light battery, F, Department of Vii'gina. 

One light battery, G, Division of the Mississippi. 

All the companies, except two of each regiment of artillery, have 
been dismounted, and their horses and batteries turned over to the 
proper staff departments. The dismounted companies have been 
assigned to permanent fortifications on the sea-board. The two bat- 
teries in each regiment are retained under the provisions of the acts 
of March 2, 1821, and March 3, 1847. 

All sea-coast forts south of Fort Monroe, except Forts Taylor and 
Jefferson, Fla., are to be garrisoned by colored troops. 

OF THE CAVALRY RBOIMENT8. 

The First, Fourth, and Sixth Regiments are assigned to the Divis- 
ion of the Gulf in the Southwest. 

The Second and Third Regiments to the Division of the Missouri. 

The Fifth Regiment is divided between the Departments of Wash- 
ington, the Middle Department, and the Division of the Tennessee. 

The single-battalion infantry regiments are assigned as follows: 

FOURTH U. 8. INFANTRY. 

Fort Brady, Sault Ste. Marie, Mich., two companies. 

Fort Wayne, Detroit, Mich., the regimental headquarters and two 
comi>anies. 

Fort Niagara, N. Y., one company. 

Fort Ontario, Oswego, N. Y., one company. 

Madison Barracks, Sackett's Harbor, N. Y., two companies. 

Rouse's Point, N. Y., two companies. 

Tlie First Regiment U. S. Infantry is in the Department of Louisi- 
ana. 

9 R R — SERIES lU, VOL V 



130 COBRE8POND£NGE, ETC. 

The Second in the Department of Kentucky. 

The Third and Tenth are in the Division of the Missouri. 

The Fifth is in New Mexico. 

The Sixth in the Department of South Carolina. 

The Seventh in the Department of Florida. 

The Eighth in the Middle Department. 

The Ninth on the Pacific Coast. 

The three battalion regiments of infantry are assigned as follows: 

The Eleventh and Seventeenth Regiments are recruiting and organ- 
izing preparatory to assignment. 
- The Twelfth Regiment is assigned to the Department of Virginia. 

The Thirteenth, Eighteenth, and Nineteenth Regiments are assigned 
to the Division of the Missouri. 

The Fourteenth is on the Pacific Coast. 

The Fifteenth and Sixteenth Regiments are in the Division of the 
Tennessee. 

BNIISTMBNT OF MINORS AS MUSICIANS. 

The act of July 4, 1864, section 6, and the act of March 3, 1864, 
section 18, make it an offense to enlist any minor under the age of 
sixteen years. It is recommended that this act be modified so far as 
to authorize a limited number, say 100, of boys, not under twelve 
years, as musicians, provided the consent of parent or guardian is 
previously obtained. Until the passage of the act referred to a 
detachment of boys was kept under instruction at each of the recruit- 
ing depots. They were not only carefully trained as young soldiers 
and musicians — i, c, drummers, fifers, and buglers — ^but were well 
taught in the common school branches at the post school. Many of 
these boys have turned out good scholars and excellent soldiers, 
reaching, as their age matured, to the grades of non-commissioned, 
and even of conunissioned officers. 

DEDUCTION OP PAY FROM OFFICERS ON LKAVB. 

By section 31, act of March 3, 1863, and section 11, act of June 20, 
1864, it is provided that officers on leave of absence for a longer period 
than thirty days in one year shall receive only half of the pay and 
allowances prescribed by law, and no more. It is recommended that 
this provision be now repealed. It operates to the serious disadvan- 
tage of valuable officers who have earned a longer respite from duty 
than tliirty days, and who probably, through a series of years, may 
have been absent in all less than thirty days. At the same time it 
places no restriction on those who serve little with their regimento, 
but habitually report on surgeon's certificate of ill-health. 

SERGEANTS FOR SUPERINTENDENTS OF CEMETERIES. 

There are now in existence some forty National Cemeteries, sad 
monuments of mortality among our soldiers during the war. It is 
recommended that an act of Congress shall provide for the enlistment 
of a disabled soldier as a superintendent for each cemetery, who shall 
have the same pay and allowances as an ordnance-sergeant, and Ih» 
charged with the care and preservation of the grounds and all their 



UNION AUTHOaiTIES. 131 

appartenanoes. An analogy to this proposed measare may be found 
in the ordnance-sergeants of the Army, appointed under the act of 
April 5, 1832, for the care of ordnance stores at posts. 

REPORTS OF BATTLES. 

Much attention and labor has been expended upon the preparation 
of the documents relating to the rebellion, required to be printed by 
resolution of May 19, 1864. Eight volumes, with maps and indexes, 
have been completed and sent to the Public Printer. The greater 
part of the other rejiorts of battles, marches, &c., have been copied 
and arranged, but await the receipt of some important reports, which, 
though repeatedly called for, have not been furnished, and are 
requisite to preserve the chronological order. 

REGISTER OP VOLUNTEERS. 

The Register of Volunteer Officers called for by resolution approved 
June 30, 1864, will be completed by the time Congress assembles, 
and all the manuscript will by that time be in the hands of the 
Public Printer. As will be seen by examination, it is a work of 
considerable magnitude, embracing some 200,000 names of officers. 
No pains have been spared to make it a full and accurate record of 
every volunteer regiment received into the U. S. service during the 
war. 

VOLUNTEER SERVICE. 

The accompanying statement, marked B, will show the number of 
volunteer recruits, drafted men, and substitutes forwarded to the 
field (aggregate 202,117), and of volunteers, drafted men, and militia 
mustered out and discharged (aggregate 61,000), under the direction 
of this office, from November 1, 1864, until April 30, 1866. 

When the work came of disbanding the large armies no longer 
required by the exigencies of the service, the plan suggested by 
experience, which had been successful with smaU bodies, was con- 
tinued. The same machinery of mustering officers and depots which 
had been employed in recruiting has been used in discharging. As 
many regiments as could be at one time furnished with means of 
transportation and funds for paying them oflP, have been sent home 
with their organization entire, from time to time as they could be 
spared from the department in which they were serving, beginning 
with those whose terms of service would soonest expire. The regi- 
ments have been mustered out of service on rolls carefully prepared 
to exhibit the dues from the Government to each soldier. The rolls, 
boxed up and sent under charge of an officer, have arrived at the 
State rendezvous simultaneously with the regiments. The officers of 
each regiment have been held to a strict accountability, under pain 
of forfeiture of an honorable discharge and pay, for the good behavior 
of the enlisted men until all were finally paid their dues and furnished 
with discharges within a few miles of their homes. Witl^ rare excep- 
tions the conduct of these gallant regiments, coming from every part 
of the North, has been most admirable in maintaining the strict dis- 
cipline which made them successful in battle, until they were released 



132 CORRESPONDBNCB, ETC. 

from militaiy reBtraint and had separated, each to his home and his 
civil avocation. Too much praise cannot be gl%'en the nomerona 
corps of mustering officers and pajrmasters, whose fidelity is attested 
by the large numbers (800,963) of men discharged and i>aid within a 
brief period, as shown in the annexed statement B. Nor can the 
extraordinary facilities ofl!ered by the several railroad companies for 
transporting such large bodies of men fail to attract attention. No 
apology is made for alluding to these matters in this report, for they 
are facts of the utmost significance in connection with the military 
power and resources of this country. Statement C shows the force in 
service May 1, 1864, and March 1, 1865, respectively. 

COLORED TROOPS. 

For statistics and information in regard to the colored troops, refer- 
ence is invited to the accompanying report of the able chief of the 
Bureau for Colored Troops, attached to this office. The number at 
present retained in service is about 85,024, out of 186,097, the whole 
number, officers and men, mustered in since it was first decided to 
employ them. 

The general orders and circulars annexed to this report will give 
useful information concerning movements of the Army.* 

By systematic classification of the varied duties of this department, 
the officers intrusted with each branch have been able promptly and 
successf ullv to accomplish all that could in reason be expected of 
them, and they, together with the admirable clerks — mostly taken 
from the armies — ^by whom they were so ably assisted, are entitled to 
the warmest commendation. 

The officers of the Adjutant-General's Department are employed as 
follows: 

One brigadier-general on special service. 

One colonel in charge of the Adjutant-Oeneral's Office,. War 
Department. 

One colonel and six majors, assistants in the Adjutant-Generars 
Office. 

One lieutenant-colonel and one major, on duty at the Headquarters 
of the Army. 

One lieutenant-colonel and two majors, on duty at headquarters of 
military divisions and departments. 

One lieutenant-colonel, Provost-Marshal-G^neral. 

One lieutenant-colonel and one major awaiting orders. 

One major on duty in the Provost-Marshal-Generars Bureau. 

One major on leave of absence. 

One major on duty in the War Department. 

I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

E. D. TOWNSEND, 
Assistant AdjiUant-Oeneral. 

•See General Orders, Noe. 101,105,106,114,119.121,141, and 146. and Circulars 
Nob. 19, 26, 28, 80, 81, 85, 89, 41, 44, and 46, pp. 48, 48, 49, 54, 62, 65, 124, 125, 24, 56, 61, 65, 
08, 96, 96, 98, 108, 156, respectively. 



UNION AUTHORITIES. 



138 



A. — Statement of the number of enlutments and re-enlistments in the Regular 
Army from October SI, I864, to October i, 1866, 



(Compiled from rsporto forwarded to tble offloe by reomitlng oflkoert.) 



General aervioe 4, 

Moimted service 8, 

Iflt GftTalry 

ad Cavalry 

3d Cavalry 

4th Cavalry 

5thCavalry 

eth Cavalry 

Iflt Artillery 

dd ArtiUery. 

8d Artillery 

4thArtm0ry 

5Ui Artillery 

lat Infantry 

ad Infantry 

8d Infantry 

4thInfBntry 

5thlnfantry • 

Okhlnfantry 



698 

088 

181 

16 

6 

24 

42 

87 

149 

7 

867 

182 

165 

44 

869 

9 

80 

88 

140 



7th Infantry . 
8thlnfantry 
9th Infantry . 
10th Infantry 
11th Infantry 
12th Infantry 
18th Infantry 



64 
116 
241 

18 
968 
694 
742 



Uthlnfantry 1,762 

16thlnfantry 1,208 

lOthlnfantry 804 

nthlnfantry 761 

ISthlnfantry 862 

lOthlofantry 698 

Engineer Corps 287 

Ordnance Corps 209 

MiUtary Academy -* 260 

Total-- 19,666 



E. D. TOWNSEND, 
Assistant Ad^futant'Oeneral, 
Wab Dspartmbmt, Ai>jx7tant-Gsnibral*8 Offick, 

Washinfftcn, November 14, 1866. 

B. — EaMbit of recruits-^ixAunteera, drafted, and substitutes— for old and new 
organizations, forwarded to the field; volunteers, drafted men, and mUitia 
mustered out and discharged from the service of the United States under the 
dhreeticn of the AdHutant-OeneraTs Office, from November 1, 1864, to November 
16^1866, 

FO&WABDSD TO FISLD. 





Volanteeni for 1, 2, and 8 yean. 


1 














« 


1 


1 


1 


1 


AlAbems 


251 












2,962 


ArkAiiirm 












172 


CtelifomiA 












251 


Ckikmdo 














OmiMMftieiit 


1,457 
8,710 

i.a« 






1 


180 


'« 


^•^ 


IMAwaw 






yioridA 










10 


Geoncto 












2,707 


ininois 


10 
15 


M 




15.880 
12,554 


6.804 
6.087 
1.480 


29.518 


Tiulivjifi^, 


28.251 


Iowa 






2,526 


Titidfftii Teixltvry 












^■^nee " 


525 

1,250 

918 

2.836 

4,439 

549 










"65* 

1,264 


500 


Kootneky 


2 






i:857* 


"•S 


Loai^ftzui 







Maine 




80 





2.806 


1.590 
2.180 

100 
1,686 

698 


8.245 
5,448 
3,114 


M«Tl4lll4 






8 

4 
16 




800 

818 

1.967 


Miehican 

MiioMwita I 



a Aaoipiod to old reglioanU ia wfaioh then wen Taoanoiaa for oomiMuilaa. 

b Indndea new organisations (colored). 

c The nnmber opposite Maryland inolodee those forwarded ftom Delawan. 



134 C0BBE8P0MD£NGE, ETC. 

B.—Exhibit of recruU9--w)lu7Ueer9, drafted, and subsHtutea, <te.--Ooiitmtied. 



FORWARDED TO FIELD-Conttoned. 





Volonteers for 1, a, and 3 years. 


1 

1 






i 


New orgaDisations. 




SUte. 


& 


9 

i 


1 


1 


1 


IfiuiMioDi 


M,412 

1,254 

648 

2,190 

B,4U 

ftl.781 

6. 097 

7,600 

655 

52,015 

52,487 












L4IS 


fflltimf...::::::::::: 


2 
2' 






2.183 
176 
278 

2,795 


8,614 
6,228 


6^012 




2 
3 

6 


:::;:::•: 


ten 


Hew JeraoT 


6,0a 


NewYoVk.::::::::::.::.:: 


18,487 


North Cirolina . 


1,781 


Ohio 


U 

8 






14,371 

8,907 

172 


2,846 


28.314 


P^nntvlvmofft T T r , 


62 

2 




§868 


Rhode Island 


S 


Sonth Carolina 


2L015 


TennfMSM 












S,487 


Texas 














Vermont 


839 

5715 

210 




2 




206 


68 


L113 


Virsinia 


715 


WeatVirffinia 




4 

13 




868 
5,541 


447 

3,272 

905 


1,020 


Wisconsin 


1,710 1 5 


10,523 


District of Colnmbia 


170 




1,078 






1 






U. R volanteera 














, 


j 






TTnclasnifled T7... , 


1 1 






1 1 1 1 




Total 


77,921 


68 


218 1 1 


70,806 


58,880 


202,117 











a Assigned to old regiments in which there were racancies for companies. 
b Inclndee new organisations (colored). 

MUSTERED OUT AND RETURNED TO THEIR HOMES. 





From Nov. 1, 1864. to ^ 
April 30, 1865. 


From May 1. 1865. to Nov. 15, 
1865. 




State. 


1 


1 
1 
1 


1 


1 


1 


» 


1 


i 


|6tfi 


1 


Alabama 










1 
6 






622 

4,688 


2 
1 


684 


A rk Ansan 








1 


4,680 


California I 








Colorado 1 








1 

21 
5 






566 

13,992 
2.943 




566 


Connecticut...... 


1 
1 


1 




212 
712 




8 
1 


26 
6 
1 


14,280 


Delaware 


3.661 


Florida . 






1 


Georgia 




















nituois 


1 

1 


5 
11 
5 


""3 


1.498 

2.220 

416 


102 
00 
84 

3 
15 
21 

2 
19 
15 
42 
84 
11 


2 


26 
25 
2 


68,922 
60.083 
28,511 

2.139 

7.681 
12.124 

1.156 
15. 576 
11.786 
34,003 
27.835 

8.640 


150 
65 
22 


70. 570 


Indiana . . ^ . , . 


62,368 


Iowa 


23,953 


Indian Territory* .... ' . , . . r - 


2.139 


Xanaas ^ 


10 
20 


1 
2 


677 
9,466 


4 
2 
17 

1 


1 
8 

3 
15 
10 

1 


2 
14 


8,810 


Kentucky 


17 


21,604 
1,156 


Maine 

Maryland 

Massachusetts 

Michigan 


4 
...... 


I 
1 
11 




...... 


677 

261 

5,523 

223 

57 


31 
10 
64 

47 
17 


16,284 
12,036 
89,590 
28,106 


Mljmesoto 1 


8,714 



alnelnding IndlTidnal musters out 



UNION AUTHOBITIK8. 185 

B. — EaehibU of reenUU—^volunteers, drafted, and substitutes^ <te.— Oontiniied. 

MnSTKRED OUT AND RBTURNED TO THEIR HOMBS-Gonttaiied. 





From Nov. 1, 18C4, to 
April 30, 18«5. 


From May 


1, 1865, to Not. 15, 
1865. 




Statu. 


i 

t 


} 




1 


1 '^ 

II 


1 


i 


p51 


1 


HiMiaah>i>i 








I 
28 
16 
21 
153 

3 




426 


426 


iSSSrf:...::::::::::::::. 








9.842 
320 
247 

4.358 


...... 


8 
1 
5 
35 


18,214 

»;oi8 

18.770 
117, 206 
2.248 
81.704 
102,450 
4,795 


15 22, 571 


New Hampahire 


2 

1 
13 






10 0. 354 


KevJeracT 






15 19, 0({2 


New York. 


6 


1 


191 j 121.755 


North CanOlna 


1 
106 
116 

4 


2,249 


Ohio 

P4iia«jlTaiiiia .............. 


4 
10 


10 
12 


5 


1.080 
7,500 


122 
118 


4 
1 


80 
14 
6 


83.496 
110,060 


ium4« inlaml 


6 




4; 799 


Soath Carolina 












Teaaewee 








1.044 


23 

1 
12 




5 


14.586 
853 
9,402 
98 
12.104 
30.004 
2.699 


8 1 16.540 


TftXM 










853 

9,827 

98 

12,957 


TennoBt 


1 






310 


i 

1 

4 


2 

...... 

15 


25 


Tlprinia 






We«t Vfrcinia 


1 
4 






851 
1.5$6 


16 
40 

4 


2 


"WinwTOitn , . 


2 


1 


32 


31,592 


District of OoIamUa 


2,699 


EeodecToiia for volanteen. 






6 10.038 








10,938 


V. S. rolnD tears 






10 


3 


3 


10,075 
25,087 
48,947 


2 


10,077 










25.087 




1 














48,947 






















Total 


68 


100 


14 


61.000 


1. 000 i 42 


226 


799.978 


M5 


861, 0C8 











a Inolndiag IndiTidoal mnateni out. 



h Drafted tnbfltltatea and volunteerB. 



RECAPITULATION. 

Forwarded to Hold 202,117 

Kutered oat and ratomed to their homes 861,963 

Total 1,064,080 

REMARKS. 

The rapidity with which the work of mustering out and disbanding the Volun- 
teer Army was ezecnted will be apparent from the f oUowing, showing the numbers 
nrastered out to the dates set opixxdte them, respectively, viz : 

Aug. 7,1865 640,806 

Aug. 22,1865 719,338 

Sept 14,1865 .• 741,107 

Oct. 15, 1865 785,205 

NoT.15,1865 800,963 

The command of Major-General Sherman (Army of the Tennessee and Army of 
Georgia) and the Army of the Potomac were the first to complete their musters 
out entirely. Raiments commenced leaving (General Sherman's command — then 
numbering, present and absent, 116,183 officers and men — from the rendezvous 
near this city on the 29th of May, and on the Ist of Aup^st the last one of the 
regiments mustered out left Louisville, Ky., to which point the command (after 
the musters out therefrom were partlv completed) was tran^erred and the armies 
composing it merged into one, called the Army of the Tennessee. The work of 
mustering out the troops was not continuous, it having been interrupted and 
delayed by the transfer of the two armies from this city to Louisville, and their 
subwquent consolidation. Regiments commenced leaving the A^y of the Poto- 
mac (then numbering, including Ninth Corps, 162,851 officers and men, present 
and absent) from the rendezvous near this city on the 29th of May, and about six 



136 



CORBESPONDfiKCE, ETC. 



weeks tlief«affcer(Jid7 19) the but radmentfltarted for h^^ I>iiti]|g the inter- 
r$X the workflike that for General Shennan's command, was not continnoas, it 
being intemroted and deUiTed by the movement of the Sixth GorpB from Dan- 
Tille, Va., to tnie city and the consolidation, by orders of Jnne 28, A the remain- 
ing portion of the army into a proTisUmal corps, nnmbering, present and absent, 
22,009 oiScers and men. Thns, for the two commands in question, and between 
the 29tii €d May and the Ist of August (two months), 279,084 ofBoers and men, 
present and absent, were mustered out ana placed en route to tlieir homes. Inclnd- 
iDg other armies and departments, the number was increased by August 7 (two 
months and seren days) to640,806 olBoers and men. From ihe foregoing it is seen 
that the mass of the forces dischaived were mustered out hj September 14, or 
within two months anda half from tne time the moyementa of troops homeward 
commenced. The average per month during that time is 396,443. 

THOMAS M. VINCENT, 
AMtiatant A^pUant-Oeneral, 
War Dbpabtkxivt, Ai>jxrrAST^KmaLAi/s Offick, 

November 16, 1866. 

C.—Eaavantoftheforeesofthe United States on the lei of May, I864. 



▲nny or department 


lilt 


i 

1 


TWnMWanMit tkf We«hlBffi(ni r 


j , 


Armyof thePotonuM..''. 


U0.384 
66,130 

18.166 
61,866 
23.666 
74»170 
15.776 
5.S6 

476 

119. M8 
35,416 
6,546 


PreeeDt, eiek In field hospitals ornnfit; ail, 286 

for doty. 1 
Ahsent on detached anrvioe . . 100 S48 




Ahaent with leaTO, incloding prisoners J 666, 280 




DeDotmentof theTennaMee 


Absent, in Keneral hoepitals and on 676*878 
siok leaTO at home. 


Thnrnrtmrnttrf the 11 feaonrl 




Absent without authority 


616,488 




Grand aggregate, present and 
ahaent. 




HMdoQArtere MUitarr DlTUion of the 


870.710 






Northern DepMtment 






30,782 ! 






2,.828 
2.V70 
5,627 
20,780 






Depertmeut of the SaMoehaDD* 








Depiurtaientof HewMexloo 


3,454 . 




DeoerteieBtof tbePMllio 


5,141 










Total 


a662,846 









a Taken from monthly returns. 



6 Taken firom tri«monthly returns. 



*An examination of the orignal returns for April 80, 1864 (from which the 
numbers in this column were compiled) , shows that all officers and men reported 
as *' present for duty," *' on extra or daily duty," and *' in arrest or confinement," 
are here included under the head of ** aggregate present available for duty." 



UKIOH AUTH0BITIB8. 



187 



CSoBhOrit ofthefareetofthe UnUed Staiet an the Itt of Marehy JS65--CofDrd. 

(ICade op from tri-monthly retiinu.) 



Amy or depftrtamit. 



SnnuBftry. 



UtaiyDlTisloii of the 



Headqiiarten MiUtary DlviBion of the 

MiMlMtpvL 

Oepartmoii t of tho Cumberland 

Department of tbeTenneaMe 

Len Wing, Army of Oeonda. 
CaTalrr Gorpe, MlUtaij Dtrii 

MiMlMlppr 
HaAdqimrten MUltanr Dfrlsion of West 

MlMlealppL 
B«Mrve BriAdet Mflltarr Dlylslon of 

WeetSCiMlMippl. 

Department of the Golf 

Departmentof Arkansai 

Department of the liiaeimlppl 

Sixteenth Axmr Corpa 

Beadqnarten ICmtary Divialon of the 

Mlaaoori. 

Departmentof the MiMOorl 

Department of the Northwest 

Headquarters Middle MUitory Division. 
Cavalry ForoeaMfddleMQitaijDiTisioii. 

Nineteenth Army Corps 

Middle Department 



Department of Washington .... 
Department of West Vurginia . 
Departmmit of Pennsylvania . . 

Departmentof the East 

Departmentof Virginia 

Department of North Carolina. 

Departmentof the Sooth 

Departmentof Kentooky 

Northern Department 

Departmentof the Padflc 

Department of New Mezieo. .. . 



108,278 
17 

88,686 
46,648 
81,644 
87,410 



18,748 

85,625 
84,608 
84,151 
14,805 
12 

18,557 

4.781 

841 

12.080 

6,612 

2.060 

86,066 

15,517 

880 

7,462 

45.066 

34.045 

11.510 

10,666 

11.820 

7,024 

2.501 



Brooght forward— present avallaUa for 

Present, slok in Held hospitals or onflt 

for doty. 

Absent on detached servioe 

Absent with leave. Indoding prisoners 

of war. 
Absent in general hospitals and on 

slek leave at home. 
Abaent withont aothority 



602.686 

35.688 

182,688 
81.686 

148,448 

10.688 



Grand aggMgate. pnseot snd 



a866.601 



Total.. 



608.608 



aBy the let of May. 1865, the aggregate nomber (065,501) was Increased to 1,000.516 by additional 
enllstroeuts.t 

THOMAS M. VINCENT. 

Aatistant Addjutant-Oeneral. 
War Depaktment. Adjutant-Genbral's Office, 

November 18y 1865. 

{Indoaors.] 

Adjt. Gkn.'s Office, Bureau for Colored Troops, 

Washington, D. C, October 20, 1866, 
General: To the 101,950 colored soldiers in the service of the 
United States at the date of my last report, the following additions 
have been made during the year, namely: 

17 regiments of infantry, aggregate strength 16.301 

2 regiments of heavy artillery , aggregate strength 2, 708 

2 batteries light artillery, aggregate strength 251 

1 regiment of cavalry, anpregate strength 1,255 

Recmits, drafted men, and snostitntes sent to old regiments 29,099 

Total gain, 49,609 

* An examination of the origpoial returns for Febmary 28, 1865 (from which the 
nnmbers in this column were compiled), shows that all officers and men reported 
as ** present for duty," ** on extra or daily duty," and " in arrest or confinement," 
are here included tmder the head of '* aggregate present available for duty." 

f But see a later official cominlation for April 80, 1865 (Vol. lY, this series, p. 
1283), which gives.an aggregate of 1,052,088. 



138 



CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. 



Four thousand two hundred and forty-four recruits were enlisted at 
the rendezvous established in the didloyal States and credited to loyal 
States under section 3 of the act of Congress approved July 4, 1864.* 

On the 15th of July, 1865, the date on which the last organization 
of colored troops was mustered in, there were in the service of the 
United States — 

▲ggmgato. 

120 regiments of infantry 08, 938 

12 regiments heavy artillery 15,<)02 

10 batteries light artillery 1,811 

7 regiments cavalry 7,245 

Total 128,156 

The foregoing is the largest number of colored troops in service at 
any one time during the war. 

The entire number of troops, commissioned and enlisted, in this 
branch of the service during the war is 186,097. 

The States in which this force was recruited or drafted are as fol- 
lows, namely: 



Maine 104 

NewHampslftire... 125 

Vermont...* 120 

Rhode Island 1,887 

Massachnsetts 3,966 

Ck>nnecticnt 1,764 

New York 4,125 

New Jersey. 1,185 

Pennsylvania 8, 612 

Delaware 954 

Maryland 8,718 

District of Columbia 8,269 

Virginia 5,728 

West Virginia 196 

Alabama 4,969 

Mississippi 17,869 

Louisiana 24,052 

Arkansas 5, 526 

Tennessee -. 20,188 

Kentucky 28,708 

Michigan 1,887 



Ohio 6,093 

Indiana 1,537 

Illinois.. 1,811 

Missouri 8,844 

Minnesota 104 

Iowa 440 

Wisconsin 165 

North Carolina 5,035 

South CaroUna 6,462 

Georeia 8,486 

Florida 1,044 

Kansas 2,080 

Texas 47 

Colorado Territory 95 

State or Territory unknown ... 5, 896 

Total enlisted 178,975 

Officers 7,122 



Aggregate 186,097 



The loss during the war, from all causes except muster out of organ- 
izations in consequence of expiration of term of service or because 
service was no longer required, is 68,178. 

The number of colored troops already mustered out, or under orders 
for muster out, is as follows, namely : 



82 r«B:imeiits of infantrv 

2 inaependent companies and band 

2 reKimoDts of heavy artillery 

4 batteries of light artillery 

Iregimentof cavalry 



Total . 



igtb. 



28,354 

1?2 

8,007 

571 

1,130 



33,234 



* This nomber was subeequently changed to 5,052. 
p. 1270. 



See Vol. IV, this series, 



UNION AUTHOBITnCS. 139 

The number of organizations discontinued during the war, by con- 
solidation or transfer, and their strength when discontinued, is as 
follows, namely: 



Aggregate 
strength. 



17 ragtmants of infantry 

1 regiment of heavy artOlery. . 

Total 



9,887 



0,044 



The aggregate of colored troops remaining in service, after the exe- 
cution of all orders to this date for muster out of organizations, is as 
follows, namely: 



Aggregate 
■trength. 



83 regimenta of infantry 

• regimenta of faeaTy artillery. 
6 light batteriee of artillery. . . 
6 regimenta of cayalry 



08,078 

U,804 

701 

6.866 



Total. 



86.0S4 



There have been received at this office since June 1, 1863 — 

Applications for appointment 9,019 

Ciindidates examined by the Board 8,790 

Candidates rejected by the Board .,1,472 

Candidates appointed 2,818 

Total nmnber of appointments and promotionB 8,678 

Provisional appointments made by department commanders confirmed at 

this office i81 

White soldiers discharged to accept appointment 1,787 

For further details respecting examinations, appointments, resigna- 
tions, and matters of a kindred nature, attention is respectfully invited 
to appendix marked 6,* in which will also be found an exhibit of the 
organizations discontinued by consolidation, muster out, and those 
remaining in service. 

The reputation of the organization for efficiency, good conduct, and 
reliability has steadily advanced; and the reports of officers of the 
Inspector-General's Department, so far as they have come to the 
knowledge of this office, are very satisfactory as to its present 
condition. 

The commission appointed for the State of Delaware, under the 
provisions of section 24 of the act of Congress approved February 
24, 1864, having been dissolved, there is at this time in session, 
under the provisions of the act referred to, only the commission or 
board for the State of Maryland, which has been in session since 
October, 1864. 

The whole number of claims for compensation on account of the 
enlistment of slaves in the service of the United States, filed with the 
boards in both the above States, is 3,971. 

Compensation, varying in amount, was awarded upon 733 of these 
claims; 294 have been rejected by the commissions as not being well 
founded , and the remainder are still before the Board. The total 

* Omitted. 



140 CORBE8PONDEN0E, ETC. 

amount of compensation awarded loyal owners is $213,883. Twenty- 
five claims have been paid, amounting in the aggregate to $6,9(X), 
leaving 708 claims unpaid, amounting to $206,983. Ninteen thousand 
nine hundred and thirty dollars and forty cents have been expended 
in salaries of members of boards and to defray the current expenses 
of the same, including rent of rooms, purchase of fuel, stationery, 
<fec., making the total expenditures to this date $26,830.40. 

In closing this report it affords me pleasure to acknowledge the 
important services rendered the Bureau by Maj. F. W. Taggard, assist- 
ant adjutant-general of volunteers, in charge of rollaand returns, and 
Maj. A. F. Rockwell, assistant adjutant-general of volunteers, general 
assistant and disbursing oficer. To their efioient and cordial co-opera- 
tion may be attributed whatever of success has been attained in the 
management of the Bureau. 

The employes of the ofice, all originally detailed from the volun- 
teer service, have zealously and faithfully discharged the duties 
assigned them. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

C. W. FOSTER, 
Asaista/rU Ac^tUant- General Volunteers. 

Bvt. Brig. Gen. E. D. TowNSKND, 

Assistant Adjutant-General^ U. S. Army^ Washingtony D. C 



War Department, Ordnance Office, 

October 20, 1866, 
Hon. E. M. Stanton, 

Secretary of War: 
Sir: I submit the following report of the principal operations of the 
Ordnance Department during the fiscal year ended June 30, 1865, with 
such remarks and recommendations as the interests of that branch of 
the military service seem to require: 

The fiscal resources and the disbursements of the dex)artment during 
the year were as follows, viz: 

Amoant of appropriations remainiiu: in the Treasnry Jnne 80, 1864. $4, 978, 791. 97 

In the Gk)yemment depositories, to the credit of disbursing officers, 
on same date 1,797,887.16 

Amoant of appropriations from Jnne 80, 1864, to Jnne 80, 1866, 
including the fixed annnal appropriation for arming and equip- 
ping the militia --. 88,800,000.00 

Beceiyed since June 80, 1864, on account of damages to arms in 
hands of troops, from sales of arms to officers, and of condenmed 
stores, and from all other sources not before mentioned 907, 476. 97 

Total 45,783,656.10 

Amount of expenditures since June 80, 1864 48,112,581.27 

In the Gk>yemment depositories, to the credit of disbursing officers, 

June 80, 1866 2,671,124.88 

Amount of appropriations remaining in the Treasury same date 

Total ._- 45,788,656.10 

The estimates for the next fiscal year call for appropriations only 
for continuing the armament of our permanent fortifications, and for 
the work already begun for increasing the manufacturing and storage 
capacity of the arsenals, including a distinct provision for the proper 
storage and care of gunpowder. These are all measures not confined 
to the necessities of war, but requisite for keeping up a suitable prep- 



UNION AUTHORITIES. 14:( 

aration for any contingency and for preserving the large and valuable 
mtinitions of war which the country now poBsesses. 

The manufacturing capacity of the arsenals was steadily increased 
from the date of my last report until May, when the sudden termina- 
tion of hostilities made it apparent that the immediate demand for 
munitions of war beyond the supply then on hand and contracted for 
had ceased. 

Measures were promptly taken to reduce the manufacture and pur- 
chase of supplies, and to provide for necessary storage, and for pre- 
serving the vast quantities of ordnance and ordnance stores which 
had been issued to the armies and captured from the enemy. Exten- 
sive temporary buildings have been erected at some of the principal 
arsenals, and much of this property has already been received and 
securely stored in them. 

Large and commodious fire-proof workshops are now being erected 
at Allegheny, Water vliet, and Frankford Arsenals; and so much of 
these buildings as will not be required in time of peace for manu- 
facturing purposes can be advantageously used as store-houses, of 
which the want of an adequate supply is now manifest. 

It is in contemplation to erect extensive fire-proof workshops at 
Washington Arsenal, which is considered an eligible position for a 
first-class arsenal. A portion of these shops can likewise be used for 
storing the large quantities of ordnance supplies which are now neces- 
sarily kept in insecure temporary buildings at that ai*senal. Money 
for this object has already been appropriated by Congress. 

The importance to the country of having the armaments placed in 
the forts as rapidly as they can be prepai'ed to receive them is so evi- 
dent that I have caused the manufacture of sea-coast gun carriages to 
be continued as rapidly as practicable at the two arsenals which possess 
the proper facilities for making them; and orders have been given to 
the several founders, who have been engaged in making heavy guns 
for this department, for as many guns as carriages can be made for. 

I have been informed by the chief engineer that he will be prepared 
to receive guns in the forts faster than carriages can now be made, 
and it is in contemplation to increase the capacity for manufacturing 
sea-coast carriages. 

Experimental wrought-iron field and siege gun carriages have also 
been made and tested, with results so satisfactory as to render it certain 
that these carriages maybe advantageously substituted for the wooden 
carriages, and it is proposed to make no more gun carriages of wood. 

The smooth-bore cannon of large caliber, which have been used 
during the war, have given satisfaction, and are regarded as perfectly 
reliable. The great importance of having reliable rifled guns of 
lai^ caliber is universally admittetl, and the attention of this Gov- 
ernment and of the nations of Europe has been directed to that 
object, but so far, it is believed, without entire success in its 
accomplishment. 

The many failures, by bursting, of the celebrated Parrott guns in 
the land and naval service have weakened confidence in them, and 
make it the imperative duty of this department to seek elsewhere for 
a more reliable rifle gun. 

Mr. Horatio Ames, of Falls Village, Conn., invented a plan of mak- 
ing MTTOught-iron guns, which many believe would possess those qual- 
ities which are so very desirable for guns of heavy caliber, and 
although the cost of these guns was necessarily vei-y gi^at in com- 
parison with the cost of cast-iron guns, a conditional order was given 



142 COBBE8PONDENCE, ETC. 

to Mr. Ames to manufacture fifteen of them for the Government, the 
condition being that the gnns should be superior to any rifled guns in 
the service. One of these guns was fired under the direction of a 
board of officers, who unanimously expressed the opinion that the 
^'Ames wrought-iron guns possess, to a degree never before equaled 
by any cannon of equal weight offered to our service, tM essential 
qualities of great lateral and longitudinal strength, and great powers 
of endurance under heavy charges; that they are not liable to burst 
explosively and without warning, even when fired under very high 
charges, and that they are well adapted to the wants of the service 
generally, but esjmcially whenever long ranges and high velocities 
are required." The Board also expressed the opinion that the fifteen 
Ames 7-inch guns possessed sufficient weight and strength to receive 
an 8-inch bore, and recommended that the gun which had been fired 
under their direction should be reamed up to eight inches and sub- 
jected to further trial. 

They further decided that Mr. Ames had fulfilled the obligation 
incurred by him in his contract to furnish the gun, and that so many 
of the guns as should endure a proof of ten rounds with the service 
charge, and pass the proper inspection, should be accepted and 
paid for. 

Two of the fourteen guns burst in proof, exhibiting serious defects 
in their manufacture— defects in welding— which I had been appre- 
hensive could not be avoided. The guns which endured the proof of 
ten rounds were accepted and paid for by this Department. 

The gun which was fired under the direction of the Board was bored 
up to eight inches and fired twenty-four times with service charges, 
when it burst, exhibiting the same defects that were developed in the. 
other guns which burst. The failures in subsequent firing indicate 
that these guns cannot be relied upon, and that no more of them 
ought to be made for the department. 

Believing that, with our present knowledge of the properties of 
metals and our skill in working them, reliable rifle guns of large 
caliber can be made of cast-iron, I have, with your sanction, caused a 
pair of 8-inch rifle guns of the supposed proper model and weight to 
be made. These guns are now at Fort Monroe undergoing extreme 
proof, and should their endurance be satisfactory it is proposed to 
have other guns like them made. 

NATIONAL ARMORY. 

The capacity of this establishment for the manufacture of muskets 
was not increased after the date of my last report, and ux>on the con- 
clusion of hostilities, in view of the large number of muskets on hand 
of a model which will probably become obsolete very soon, the manu- 
facture was reduced as rapidly as it could be done with economy; 
and at present no new muskets are being assembled. Only those parts 
which were in different stages of advancement are being finished. 

In my last report I stated that it was in contemplation to change 
the manufacture at the National Armory as soon as the best model 
for a breech-loading musket could be established, and that details for 
effecting this measure would receive the early attention of this Bureau. 
Extensive experiments have been made by a board of officers, and 
also under my direction and supervision, to effect that object; but as 
yet no arm has been presented which I have been willing to i*ecom- 
mend for adoption. The selection of a proper model is considered so 



UKION AUTHORITIES. 143 

important a measure that I have preferred to act slowly and with 
great care in its selection rather than take a false step and have to 
retrace it. I hope to be able very soon to recommend a model for 
yonr approval. 

A plan for altering the mnzzle-loading musket into efQcient breech- 
loaders has been devised by the master armorer at Springfield Armory, 
which appears to be superior to any other that I have seen. I have 
taken measures to have 5,000 muskets altered according to it, and will 
have some of them issued to troops for trial as soon as the alterations 
can be made. 

The muskets of the prescribed i)attem which have been turned in 
by the troops are being cleaned and repaired. 

The number of Springfield muskets on hand and suitable for issue 
will reach nearly one million, while the number of folwign and cap- 
tured muskets will exceed half a million. As none of the latter class 
will probably be required for issue, and as the care and preservation 
of them will be attended with considerable expense, they should be 
sold whenever suitable prices can be obtained for them. This recom- 
mendation will apply to other ordnance stores of a perishable nature, 
which are in excels of the wants of the department. 

In my last annual report I called your attention to the danger of 
keeping large quantities of gunpowder at our arsenals, which are gen- 
erally in the vicinity of closely populated districts, and recommended 
that a suitable site for a depot capable of storing at least 100,000 bar- 
rels of gunpowder should be acquired. The conclusion of the war has 
left this department with vast supplies of gunpowder and prepared 
ammunition on hand, all of which has to be stored at the arsenals, and 
much of it in buildings which are entirely unfit for the purpose, there- 
by endangering the safety of the arsenals, and in some cases of private 
property in the vicinity. This evil cannot be corrected too soon, and 
I earnestly call your attention to the necessity of obtaining from Ck>n- 
gress authority to purchase a suitable site for a powder depot. 

In my annual estimate I have asked for an appropriation for the 
purchase of a site and the erection of magazines. Only so much 
powder as may be necessary to supply the current wants of the Army 
should be kept at the arsenals. 

The military reserve at Jeflferson Barracks, Mo., being a suitable 
position for a powder depot for supplying the Mississippi Valley, and 
a portion of it having some years ago been assigned to this depart- 
ment for the erection of powder magazines, I have taken measures to 
have three magazines capable of containing 5,000 barrels each erected 
on it, and two of them will be finished this fall. 

In my last annual report I stated that, in pursuance of the pro- 
visions of the act of Congress approved April 19, 1864, possession had 
been taken of Rock Island for the purpose of building and maintain- 
ing thereon an arsenal for the construction, deposit, and repairs of 
anns and munitions of war. The United States has not yet acquired 
a title to the property which has been taken possession of. It is 
important that the provisions of the act of Congress above referred to 
should be carried into effect and a complete title to all of Rock Island 
acquired by the United States before any permanent buildings are 
commenced. I recommend that this be done with as little delay as 
practicable. Evidences of title to the land, of which p6ss6ssion has 
been taken, have been forwarded to you for examination by the 
Attorney-General, as is required by the act above referred to. 



144 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. 

Adjacent to Rock Island and connected with it by a dam is a small 
island known as Benham's Island, of which possession has not been 
taken. It appears to have been the intention of Congress in passing 
the act above referred to that the United States should have full and 
complete possession and control of Rock Island for military purposes. 
Should Benham's Island or any other small islands or accretions in 
the river lying between Rock Mand and the shores of Illinois and 
Iowa be held by private parties, with the right of way across the 
island, as is now claimed by the owner of Becdbam's Island, the prin- 
cipal object of the law will be thereby defeated. 

If additional legislation is necessary to give the United States full 
I)ossession and control of the whole of Rock Island, including the 
adjacent island, I recommend that it be asked of Congress. 

The buildings erected as a prison and barracks on Rock Island have 
been turned over io the Ordnance Department and are now used as 
store-houses, <fec. 

Several of the Southern arsenals have been reoccupied, and it is the 
intention of the department to reoccupy all of them, except the Fay- 
etteville Arsenal, in North Carolina, which was destroyed. 

An extensive powder mill at Augusta, Ga., and a large armory 
(unfinished) and a laboratory at Macon, Ga., which were built by the 
rebel government, have fallen into possession of this department. 
The necessary measures for preserving the property have been taken. 

The number of permanent U. S. arsenals and armories, exclusive of 
temporary depots established for war purposes, most of which have 
been and all of which will soon be discontinued, is now twenty-eight. 
In addition to the command and supervision of these, the officers of 
this department are charged with the inspection of materials and 
manufacture of ordnance, gunpowder, and such small-arms and equip- 
ments as are made for the Government at the foundries, jwwder mills, 
and other private establishments. These duties furnish constant 
employment for all the officers of the ordnance corps now authorized 
by law, the total number of which is sixty-four. The arsenals alone 
require, as a minimum number in time of peace, fifty-six, and the 
Bureau and inspection duties at least eight more. During the late 
rebellion the want of a greater number of regular ordnance officers 
educated for and experienced in their peculiar duties was seriously 
felt; and the necessity, arising from the inadequate provision in tnis 
respect, of the frequent employment of acting ordnance officers caused 
much embari'assment and confusion, and was detrimental to the public 
service and interest. These now require that the additional offices of 
the Ordnance Department authorized temporarily by sections 4 and 
12 of the act of March 3, 1863, shall be continued as part of the 
military peace establishment. 

The tabular statement accompanying this report shows in detail 
the ordnance, arms, and other ordnance supplies which have been 
procured and issued through this department during the past fiscal 
year. The armies in the field were amply and well supplied in this 
respect. The permanent fortifications have had their armaments kept 
in order, and strengthened and increased by the addition of guns of 
heavy caliber and great efficiency. 

Very i-espectf ully, your obedient servant, 

A. B. DYER, 
Brigadier- General and Chief of Ordnance. 



UNION AirrH0BITl£8. 



145 



statement of ordnance^ amUt ammunition, and other ordnance stores procured 
and fupphed to the Army^ and the quantity remaining on hand at the cJose 
of the jCaoal year ending June SO, 1866, 



ArtielM. 



Field gniiB of different calibora 

Siege gnus and morton of different OAllbera. . . 
See-eoeet gnoa and mortera of different calibem 
Cannoo-balla, abella, and other prqjectiiea for 

field jnina. 
Ganoon-balla, ahella, and other prcjeetilea for 

•lege ffnna and niortara. 
Cannon^baUa, sbella, and other projectiles for 

aea-coaat guna and mortars. 

ArtlOerj carriages for field serrloe 

Artillery carriagee for siege serrioe 

ArtiUerr carriagea for aea-coast forts 

Mortar beda 

Caiaaooa 

Traveling forgea 

Battery wagons 

MnakeU and rifles 

Csrbinea 

Pistols 

Swords and aabers 

Infiuitry aocoatenoents sets. . 

Cavalry aocoaterments do... 

Horse eqaipments do... 

Artillery hamesa for two horses do. . . 

Saddle blank«U 

Ammunition for field gnns rounds.. 

Aonnnnltion forsiege gnns and mortars .. .do. . . 
Ammunition for sea*ooaat guna and mortars, 

roands. 

Ammunition for small-arms rounds . . 

Pereosalon-capft 

Friction-prlmerfl 

Fuses 

Powder pounds . . 

Kiter do... 

Sulphur do..., 

Lead do — 

Lead balls do... 



198,297 

409.619 

618 

184 

790 

143 

616 

70 

67 

1.167.405 

22.616 

84.621 

80.646 

856,434 

68,428 

26,958 

8.029 

79.829 

793.155 

53.009 

4,806 

209,815,880 

150,931.287 

1,251.842 

980.854 

2,329,230 

8,120.240 

622,064 

80,668,929 

6,128.502 




1,285 

424 

612 

969,130 

882,806 

817.658 

725 
181 
545 

829 

689 

116 

97 

426,571 

142.201 

70.744 

112,067 

886.180 

127,850 

142.497 

4,069 

238.388 

702,156 

42,788 

54,465 

261.686,588 

178,211,512 

2,242,900 

1.800.012 

6,619,925 



•*• • 2 



19,748.668 
11,295,687 



354 
82 

508 
676.815 

14,779 

178,285 



100 

7»7 

7 

807 

87 

42 

898.404 

99.051 

87,508 

64,692 

271,925 

98,281 

95,080 

1,255 

197,940 

286.925 

15,886 

4,631 

188.784,580 

288,068,778 

1.583.640 

719,678 

5,582,380 

21,254 

218, 122 

10,7.51,494 

11,906,206 



i 

e 
I 

I 



1,756 

738 

831 

570,639 

510,828 

609,042 

896 
156 
538 



122 

1.106,572 

65,766 

68,062 

128.020 

419.639 

102,997 

74.425 

5,848 

120,277 

1,206,686 

80,511 

54,680 

282.167.888 

91,078,071 

1,911.102 

1,661,188 

8,866.825 

8,606,986 

408,932 

89,661,103 

5.517,931 



Ordnance Office, 

October SO, 1865. 



A. B. DYER, 
Brigadier-Oeneral and Chief of Ordnance. 



Office Commissary-General of Subsistence, 

Washington City, D. C, October 20, 1866, 
Hon. Edwin M. Stanton, 

Secretary of War: 
Sm: In compliance with the special instructions of the War Dex)art- 
ment of October 7, addressed to chiefs of bureaus, I have the honor 
to submit the following report of the operations of the Subsistence 
Department during the past year: 

The subsistence stores required for distribution to the several armies 
in the field have during the year been purchased, as was done during 
the earlier years of the war, in the principal markets of the Northern 
States. The facilities and cost of transportation to the various points 
where they were required for issue, the relative prices in the different 

10 R R— series ni, VOL V 



146 GOKBESPONDENCE, ETC. 

marketH, and a due regard to the general commercial interests of the 
country, have governed this department in apportioning these pur- 
chases among the several market centers of the country. New Orleans, 
gradually resuming a healthy commercial condition, already enables 
this department — and in further aid of such resumption — to obtain in 
that market a considerable portion of the supplies required for distri- 
bution from that point. Although the present general condition of the 
Southern States is not such as to afford a large amount of supplies for 
the troops on duty therein, still, the officera of this department are 
able in some parts of those States to enter into contracts for beef -cat- 
tle and slaughtered beef, as also to some extent to purchase therein 
other articles. The principal purchasing officers of the Subsistence 
Department have performed their duties with great fidelity to the 
interests of the countr}^ and with much mercantile ability, and also, 
as I am frequently assured, to the general satisfaction of the com- 
mercial men of the country with whom they have transacted the busi- 
ness of this department. 

So far as has been practicable, subsistence stores have been obtained 
by advertising for and receiving sealed proposals for their delivery. 
During the past six months 402 such advertisements have been 
received and placed on file in this office. 

The principal commissaries immediately responsible for the subsist- 
ence of the several armies in the field have performed the important 
and often difficult duties of receiving, protecting, and distributing: 
the supplies forwarded to them with commendable efficiency and suc- 
cess. They have also, by great energy, been able, to a considerable 
extent, to subsist the trooi)s upon the resources of the country in which 
the armies were operating or through which they were passing. 

It is believed that during the entire war no campaign, contemplated 
movement, or expedition has failed on account of the inability of the 
Subsistence Department to meet its proper requirements. It is also 
believed that the troops, wherever stationed or operating, have, with 
rare exceptions, been supplied with rations in good and wholesome 
condition. 

While the Subsistence Department has furnished a constant, timely, 
and adequate supply of subsistence for the several lai*ge armies occu- 
pying widely different fields of operations, as also for the troops at all 
the separate positions occupied throughout the entire country, it is 
due to the Quartermaster's Department that its vast labors in the 
transportation of these supplies be recognized as having been per- 
formed with a readiness and efficiency worthy of the highest commen- 
dation. As a single item indicating the amount of these labors, I 
instance the fact that during the year 1863 the Quartermaster's 
Department shipped from the port of New York an average of 7,000 
packages of subsistence stores per day for every working day of the 
year, and for the year 1864, 6,727 packages per day. 

The sudden close of the war, and the consequent immediate muster 
out of a large part of the Army, unavoidably left on hand in some of 
the depots an excessive supply of subsistence stores. This excess has 
been sent to other points, where stores were required, instead of 
meeting such requirements by further purchases. By this course a 
considerable part of these supplies have been, or will be, economically 
disposed of. Surplus and damaged stores are in process of being 
disposed of by sale. A considerable quantity of hard bread, surplus 
or too old for issue to troops, remains to be disposed of. A sufficient 
quantity of this and other surplus articles have been held back from 
an earlier sale with the view of meeting, in an economical manner, the 



UNION AUTHORITIES. 147 

urgent wants of those x>eople, white and colored, who have, by the 
events of the war, been rednced to a suffering condition; to whom it 
has been deemed an act of charity, due from the Government, to 
make limited issues of food. 

I have the honor to report that under your orders of June 29, 1865, 
directing the discontinuance of the whisky ration, and the sale of 
the whisW on hand, the issue of that article was at once stopped. 
The sale has already taken place at many i)oints, and will soon be 
completed. 

During the past year, as in the previous years of the war, a verv 
considerable income has been derived from the sale of the hides, tal- 
low, and other parts of beef cattle not issuable as beef to the troops. 
The total amount of such sales has not been ascertained. At the 
Washington and Alexandria depots alone they amount to $344, 468. 98^ 
for the year ending 30th of September, 1866, and to $1,377,876.93 
during the four years ending at ^at date. 

Under the able and judicious management of Bvt. Brig. Gen. 
William Hoffman, U. S. Army, Commissary-General of Prisoners, the 
prisoners of war, held under his charge at thirty-two forts, prison 
bairacks, camps, and hospitals, have been well and humanely sub- 
sisted, having received a sufficient portion and variety of the ration 
to insure health, leaving in the hands of the several issuing commis- 
saries, as "savings," that x>ortion of the ration not deemed necessary 
for persons living in entire idleness. The pecuniary value of these 
"savings" has constituted a prison fund, available, under the instruc- 
tions of the Commissary-General of Prisoners, for the purchase of 
articles necessary for the prison barracks and hospitals, and for meet- 
ing other necessary expenses of the prisoners. General Hoffman 
has already, under your instructions, transferred to the Subsistence 
Department a ''savings" credit of the amount of 11,507,369.01, and 
reports that there remains yet to be transferred an amount not less 
than $337,766.98, making a total amount of $1,846,126.99. 

The discharge of volunteer forces, and the consequent reduction of 
the expenses of this department, will enable it to meet all demands 
without exhausting the appropriation for the current fiscal year. 

The current work of this Bureau is, habitually, up to date. .The 
examination of the money and property accounts is nearly as close up 
to date as it is practicable to have it. It would, however, facilitate 
the prompt examination of the money and property accounts of the 
officers of the Subsistence Department if the law permitted the 
former, as well as the latter, to be sent, by the officers rendering them, 
direct to this Bureau for its administrative action before going to the 
accounting officers of the Treasury. I do not doubt that the Third 
Auditor is of the same opinion. 

Under section 3 of the act of July 4, 1864, authorizing the claims of 
loyal citizens in States not in rebellion, for subsistence actually fur- 
nished to the Army of the United States, and receipted for by the 
projier officer receiving the same, or which may have been taken by 
Ruch officers without giving such receipt, to be submitted to the Com- 
missary-General of Subsistence, and making it his duty to cause each 
claim to be examined, there have been submitted as follows: 

Whole nnmber 1,470 

Approved for payment 50 

I^aUowed 418 

Awuting ezplanatioxu, &c 650 

Awaiting examixiation 367 



148 CORBESPONDBNCE, ETC. 

With your approval it is proposed to ascertain and exhibit, in a 
tabular form, the total quantity of each article of subsistence stores 
purchased for use of the Army during each year of the war, from 
1861 to 1865, inclusive. Such a statement would form an interesting 
addition to the mercantile statistics of the country. 

Under the act of March 3, 1865, for the better organization of the 
Subsistence Department, authorizing, during the continuance of the 
rebellion, the selection and assignment of commissaries of subsist- 
ence of the volunteer and regular service to geographical military 
divisions, to separate armies in the field, to military departments, to 
principal subsistence depots, and to the office of the Ck>mmissary- 
General of Subsistence as assistants, with the rank, pay, and emolu- 
ments of a colonel of the Subsistence Department, there have been so 
selected and assigned nine commissaries of subsistence; one from the 
regular service and eight from the volunteer service. There have 
also been selected and assigned, under authority of the same act, 
to inspection or other special duty, two commissaries of subsistence 
with the rank of lieutenant-colonel; one from the volunteer and the 
other from the regular service. Also, to divisions, two commissaries 
of subsistence with the rank of major; both from the volunteer 
service. 

During the past year two vacancies have occurred in the regular 
service of the Subsistence Department; one by the brief sickness and 
death, after much zealous and efficient field service, of Maj. John 
Kellogg, and the other by resignation of Capt. Edward R. Hopkins, a 
valuable officer. Both of those vacancies were filled by selections 
and appointments from the volunteer branch of the Subsistence 
Department. 

The Subsistence Department at the commencement of the war con- 
tained but twelve officers of all grades. It had reached this number 
by small additions, authorized bylaw, from time to time, as the Army 
was increased and the territory occupied by it extended; the several 
additions subsequent to the act of April 14, 1818, by which a commis- 
sary-general of subsistence was originally authorized, being as fol- 
lows: By the act of March 2, 1820, two commissaries; by the act of 
July 5, 1838, five commissaries; by the act of September 20, 1850, 
four commissaries. Since the commencement of the rebellion there 
have been added as follows: By the act of August 3, 1861, twelve 
commissaries; by the act of February 9, 1863, five commissaries, 
making a total of twenty-nine officers of all grades. A further 
increase is not recommended until it shall be made to appear that the 
present number of officers is inadequate to the service required of the 
department. 

The officers of this department, regulars and volunteers, have, with 
but few exceptions, performed their duties with signal fidelity and 
success. Some of them have been held from serving with troops in 
the field, much against their choice and ambition. 

To the able senior assistant commissary-general of subsistence, and 
to the other officers on duty in this Bureau, is largely due the credit 
of the general good condition of the affairs of the Subsistence Depart- 
ment which I am enabled to report. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

A. B. EATON, 
Commissary-General of Subsistence. 



UNION AUTHORITIES. 149 

War Department, Surgeon-General's Office, 

Washington, D. C, October 20, 1865. 
Hon. E. M. Stanton, 

Secretary of War: 
Sir: I have the honor to submit the following statement of finances 
and general transactions of the Medical Department for the fiscal 
year ending June 30, 1865: 

BBCKIPT8. 

Balance in the Trewnxj July 1.1884 $914,185.10 

Balance in the hands or the oistmrsing officers 884, 061 . 65 

Balance remaining of appropriation for artificial limbs for soldiers 

and seamen, per act of Jnly 16, 1868, chapter 182, section 6 4, 865. 00 

AwtitiaI a p p r o priation for the year ending Jnne 80, 1865, by act of 

Jnne 15, 1864, chapter 134, section 1 8,880,640.00 

Deficiency approxniation for the current fiscal year, by act of March 

2, 1865, chapter 78, section 8 8,251,000.00 

AnTtTift.! appropriation for the year ending Jnne 80, 1866, by act of 
March 8. ISfe, chax^ter 81, section 1, required for disbursement 
during tne present fiscal year, and placed to the credit of the 

Medical Department for that pmrpoee March 22, 1865 6,000,000.00 

Amoont drawn from apxnropriauon made by joint resolution of 
April 29, 1864, to coyer enenditures for medical attendance and 

medicine for 100-day's volunteers 800,000.00 

Amount refunded by the Subsistence Department for board of sick 

and wounded soldiers in private hospitals 64,298.40 

Amount refunded for medical attendance and supplies furnished 

prisoners of war 140,506.08 

Amount received for subsistence of officers in hospitals 286,281.04 

Amount disallowed in account of Ebeneaser Swift, U. S. Army, for 
June, 1868, and refunded from appropriation for pay of volun- 
teers 17.762.91 

Proceeds of sales of condenmed and unserviceable hospital property 59, 671 . 41 

Proceeds of sales of ice not ret^uired for hospital use 12,862.25 

Value of books and surgical instruments sold to medical officers 

and private physicians 8,811.80 

Received for hospital property sold to the Quartermaster's Depart- 
ment 7,008.61 

Received for medicines, &c., issued to refugees and freedmen 554. 78 

Recovered for hospital property lost or damaged in transportation. 584. 45 
Recovered of Actg. Asst. Surg. J. S. Gtoltner, U. S. Army, for 

property and moneys iUeffalljr disposed of 1,000.00 

Amount received for care or patients belonging to the XT. S. Navy. 288. 00 

Amount received from all other sources 446 . 20 

Total credits for the year 20,828,102.18 

Amount over-expended by disbursing officers 166.578. 84 

20,489,680.47 

DISBURSEMENTS DURINa THE YEAR. 

For medical and hospital supplies 115,204,497.20 

For pay of private physicians 1,865,821.82 

For pay of nospital employ^ 949, 462. 46 

For expenses of purveying depots 683,880.88 

For care of sick soldiers in private hospitals 240, 476. 11 

For artificial limbs for soldiers and seamen a 126, 588. 00 

Expenses of hospitals for officers 248,876.87 

Miscellaneous expenses of the Medical Department 18,996.94 

19,828,499.28 
Balance in the Treasury June 80, 1865 1,161,181.24 

20,489,680.47 

a Furnished during the year— artificial legs, 1,888; arms, 1,121. 



150 GOBRESPONDEDCE, ETC. 

The ample proviflion for sick and wounded existing at the date of 
my last annual report was increased during the ensuing months until 
a maximum of 204 general hospitals, with a capacity of 136,894 beds, 
was reached. Field hospitals, hospital transports and cars, ambulance 
corps, and the purveying depots were kept in condition to meet all 
possible requirements, and General Sherman's army was met at 
Savannah by four first-class sea-going steamers, thoroughly equipped 
as hospital transports, with extra stores and supplies for 5,000 beds, 
should it have become necessary to establish large hospitals upon his 
line of operations. 

Uj)on the receipt of Greneral Orders, No. 77, dated War Depart- 
ment, Adjutant-General's Office, April 28, 1865, immediate measures 
were taken to reduce the expenses of this department. Of the 201 gen- 
eral hospitals opened on January 1, 1865, 170 have been discontinued. 
Three of the four sea-going hospital transports have been discharged ; 
the fourth is now constantly engaged in the transfer of sick and 
wounded from Southern ports to the general hospitals in New York 
Harbor. All of the river hospital boats have been turned over to the 
Quartermaster's Department, and but a single hospital train is 
retained in the Southwest. 

The vast amount of medicines and hospital supplies becoming sur- 
plus through the reduction of the Army have been carefully collected 
at prominent points and are being disposed of at public auction, most 
of the articles bringing their full value, and in some instances their 
cost price. 

Since April, 1861, there have been appointed 547 surgeons and 
assistant surgeons of volunteers; mustered into service, 2,109 volun- 
unteer regimental surgeons and 3,882 volunteer regimental assistant 
surgeons; employed as acting staff surgeons, 75; as acting assistant 
surgeons, 5,532. 

As far as returns have been received during the war 34 officers of 
the medical staff have been killed or died of wounds received in 
action, 24 wounded, and 188 have died from disease or accident 
incurred in the service; 1 died in a rebel prison; 6 of yellow fever. 
A completed record will Increase this number. 

Two hundred and fourteen surgeons and assistant surgeons of 
volunteers, reported as supernumerary, have been mustered out. 

In compliance with the act of Congress hospital chaplains have been 
reported for muster out when the hospitals to which they were attached 
have been discontinued. Of the 265 appointed during the war 29 are 
still in commission. 

The business of this office has been largely increased by the neces- 
sity for immediate examination and settlement of the accounts of staff 
and regimental medical officers mustered out of service, while the 
number of applications from the Pension Bureau for " official evidence 
of cause of death" now averages 1,550 a month, the number received 
and acted upon in the last fiscal year being over 19,000. Other official 
inquiries requiring i*eference to I'ecords and hospital I'egisters are very 
numerous. 

The returns of sick and wounded show that of white troops 1,057,423 
cases have been treated in general hospitals alone from 1861 to July 1, 
1865, of which the mortality rate was 8 per cent. In addition to the 
alphabetical registers of dead, not yet f uUy completed, the records of 
the Medical Department contain 30,(XX) special reports of the more 
important forms of surgical injuries, of disease, and of operations. 
These reports, with statistical data and a pathological collection num- 



UNION AUTHOBITIES. l51 

boring 7,630 Bpeoimens, famish a mass of valuable information which 
is being rapidly arranged and tabulated as a medical and surgical his- 
tory of the war, for the publication of the first volumes of which an 
appropriation will be asked. 

In this connection and as illustrating more in detail the importance 
of this work the Army Medical Museum assumes the higliest value. 
By its array of indisputable facts, supported and enriched by full 
reports, it supplies instruction otherwise unattainable and preserves 
for future application the dearly-bought experience of four years of 
war. Apart from its gi*eat usefulness it is also an honorable record 
of the skill and services of those medical officers whose contributions 
constitute its value and whose incentive to these self-imposed labors 
has been the desire to elevate their profession. A small appropriation 
has been asked to continue and extend this collection. 

During the fiscal year ending June 30, 18G5, an Army Medical Board 
was appointed to meet in Cincinnati, Ohio, on the 18th day of October, 
1864, for the examination of candidates for the medical staff of the 
Army and of assistant surgeons of that corps for promotion. Nine 
applicants for admission into the medical staff were invited to present 
themselves before this board. Of this number two were fully exam- 
ined and approved, one withdrew before his examinations were con- 
cluded, two were rejected as unqualified, and four failed to appear. 
Six assistant surgeons were examined for x)romotion and found quali- 
fied. Two assistant surgeons were reported for re-examination. Of 
the approved candidates two have been appointed assistant surgeons. 

Boards have been in session at New York; Washington, D. C. ; Hilton 
Head, S. C; New Orleans, La.; Memphis, Tenn. ; Little Rock, Ark., 
and Cincinnati, Ohio, for the examination of candidates for appoint- 
ment in the volunteer medical staff. One hundred and fifty-two can- 
didates were invited before these boards, fifty-eight of whom passed 
satisfactory examinations and were appointed accordingly. The 
remainder were rejected, failed to appear, or withdrew before exami- 
nation was completed. These boards were discontinued in June, 1865. 

The casualties in this corps since June 30, 1864, are as follows: 
Appointed, 96; promoted, 40; restored, 2; resigned, 32; declined, 1; 
died, 7; dismissed, 3; discharged, 3; dropped, 1; mustered out, 19; 
canceled, 7. 

Boards for the examination of candidates for appointment as med- 
ical oficers to colored troojis have been in session permanently at 
Boston, New York, Washington, Philadelphia, Cincinnati, Saint Louis, 
and at such other points from time to time as the necessities of the 
service demanded. 

In nearly all sections of the country the health of the troops has 
been fully equal to that of the preceding years, though military move- 
ments of unprecedented magnitude have been pushed to successful 
termination without regard to seasons. An epidemic of yellow fever 
prevailed in New Berne, N. C, in September, October, and November, 
1864, causing 278 deaths among the troops stationed there, of whom 
571 were attacked. The released or exchanged prisoners arriving at 
Wilmington, N. C, from rebel prisons suffered from an epidemic of 
typhoid fever, which, however, was arrested by strict attention to 
hygienic rules and prompt transfer to Northern hospitals. With these 
exceptions no serious epidemics have appeared, and it is interesting 
to note that quarantine regulations strictly enforced by military 
authority have proven, during the occupation of Southern sea-ports 
and cities by our troops, to be an absolute protection against the 



152 



CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. 



importation of contagious or infectious diseases. In view of the 
apprehensions entertained in regard to the Asiatic cholera, now 
devastating the shores of the Mediterranean, this becomes a significant 
fact. 

For recommendations of measures tending to the greater efficiency 
of the Medical Department you are respectfully referred to the special 
report from this office called for by circular dated War Department, 
Adjutant-General's Office, October 7, 1866. 

In conclusion, I desire to bear testimony to the ability, courage, 
and zeal manifested throughout the war by the officers of the Medical 
Dex)artment under all circumstances and upon all occasions. With 
hai^ly an exception they have been actuated by the highest motives 
of national and professional pride, and the number who have been 
killed and wounded bears most honorable testimony to their devotion 
to duty on the field of battle. 

To the medical directors of armies in the field and of military geo- 
gi-aphical departments especial praise is due for the successful execu- 
tion of their arduous and responsible duties. 

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

JOS. K. BARNES, 
Surgeon-Generaly Brevet Major- Generalj U. 8. Army. 



Office of the Signal Officer, 

Washington^ October 20, 1866. 
Hon. E. M. Stanton, 

Secretary of War, Washington, D, C; 
Sir: In answer to your communication of the 7th instant, I have 
the honor to submit the following annual report of the operations of 
the Signal Corps for the year ending October 20, 1865: 

On the Ist of November, 1864, the corps was represented in the field 
by the following detachments, thoroughly equipped, active, and ener- 
getic, to wit: 



Detachment. 



71 
& 

11 



! 

is 



I 



Office of tbe SIgDal Offloer 

Department ox WaslilDgton 

SliEiialCftmp of Instructton , 

Annyof tkePotomao 

DeputmeDt of Virginia and North CaroUnn 

Department of the douth 

Department of the Cnmberland 

Department of the Tenneeaee 

Department of the Ohio 

Military DiTision of Weat Mlaaioaippi 

Department of Kanaaa 

Middle Militarj DiTlakm 

Department of the Saaquehanna 

Total 



102 



168 



9 
66 

88 
1«7 
137 

39 

87 
140 

42 
210 

61 
168 

64 



UKIOK AUTHORITIES. 153 

Such was the disposition of the corps, and the following, in general 
terms, the nature of services performed : 

The duties of the corps during the past year were letter understood 
than in previous years, which gave to it more tone and character, and 
enabled it to approximate in most of the military departments to its 
true i)osition. 

In one— the Department of the Gulf — it combined all the branches 
of the corps of information which it was designed, and of right ought, 
to be. Here it added to aerial telegraphing, telescopic reconnoitering, 
and general scouting, the entire secret service department, thus hav- 
ing all information usually gathered from these sources flow into one 
common center, where it was compared, classified, reduced to logical 
form, and then laid before the commanding general to be acted upon. 
The advantage arising from thus concentrating these services is spe- 
cially apparent in the fact that x>articular reports and doubtful infor- 
mation could be thoroughly sifted, and tested in two, three, or more 
different modes by the one officer having control of the several means 
for collecting knowledge of the enemy's movements and designs. 

In other military departments, as I have stated, the corjis only 
approximated to this more perfect system of economy. But as the 
value of concentration in militaiy organizations was being daily more 
and more recognized, these duties, if the war had continued, would 
undoubtedly have been eventually assigned to the corps wherever a 
detachment of it would have been placed upon duty. 

In the Army of the Potomac our duties were limited to signal com- 
munication, observing and reporting the changes and movements of 
the enemy, and such aide duty as we were called upon to perform. 

In the armies operating under Major-General Sherman the signal 
detachment added to signaling and telescopic reconnoitering, general 
scouting, courier, guide, and aide duty. 

The detachment in the Department of the South was limited to 
keeping communication open between the several military posts along 
the coast, and between the land and naval forces, when operating in 
conjunction. 

Upon the plains a detachment operated with the various expeditions 
against the Indians, keeping open communication between detached 
parties and the main body of the army. 

In the Department of Pennsylvania the signal detachment was 
employed in watching the crossings of the Potomac, as well as doing 
general outpost duty, with instructions to give timely information to 
the commanding general of any threatening danger, that it might be 
met upon the threshold of the department, and overcome before any 
injury could be done to the community. 

In the Department of Virginia and North Carolina, in addition to 
communicating by signals between poi-tions of the army, and the 
.observing of the movements of the enemy, the detachment was bene- 
ficially employed in various expeditions and operations of the army 
and navy combined, connecting the commanders of the two forces so 
immediately as to make their several efforts harmonize in such man- 
ner that their blows fell with double effect upon the strongholds and 
hattalions of the enemy. 

l^e insurrectionary armies having been, at the opening of the 
spring campaign, forced to surrender, and the power of the Grovern- 
ment having been re-established to its rightful extent, the great work 
of disbanding and returning to the conditions of peace the military 



154 GORRESPONDEKCE, ETC. 

force of the United States was commenced. The Signal Corps of the 
Army having been organized by an act of Congress — which in some 
of its provisions had a view to permanency, but gave to the corps 
only an organization for the term of the rebellion— was, by various 
orders from the War Department, materially reduced, until all that 
portion of it on duty east of the Mississippi River was mustered out 
and discharged. 

There now remain the detachment in the Military Division of the 
Mississippi, numbering 9 of&oers, 2 non>commissioned of&cers, and 35 
enlisted men, and the detachment in the Military Division of the Gulf, 
numbering 15 officers, 13 non-commissioned officers, and 86 enlisted 
men. These detachments are operating with the troops upon the 
plains, and throughout Texas, and along the Southwestern boundary. 

OFFICE OF THE SIGNAL OFFICER. 

The office of the Signal Officer is three-fold in its character. It is, 
first, the headquarters of the corps, where the records are collected, 
completed, and filed, and has advisory superintendence and control 
of the sx>ecial duties of the corps, and of all assignments of officers 
and men to signal duty; second, a purchasing and disbursing office, 
from which supplies of signal stores and equipments are issued to the 
various detachments of the corps in the field; third, an office for the 
examining of the signal accounts and returns of signal stores of all 
officers responsible to Government for such property. 

Connected with this office are two clerks of ** class two," to wit, 
Messra. Simeon White and Alexander Ashley, appointed in 1863. 
To the abilit}^ and faithful exertions of these persons is owing much 
of the degree of system and perfection attained in the records of the 
office. 

EXPENDITURES, ETC. 

There were expended during the year ending September 30, 1865, 
of the sums appropriated for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1865, 
$8,537.06, leaving a balance which, added to that yet remaining of 
former appropriations and to the amount appropriated for the fiscal 
year ending June 30, 1866, makes the sum of $248,062 still available. 

SPECIAL SERVICES. 

Having thus given a general view of the corps, its strength, duties, 
and expenses, I propose, without entering into a detailed statement 
of the constant and various acts of service performed, which were 
part and parcel of every battle fought and campaign made during the 
year, and which played in each a more or less important function, to 
merely place upon record, through the War Department, several 
instances where the operations of the corps were of such vital impor- 
tance that all who read must acknowledge that the Signal Corps was a 
valuable adjunct to the Army, and rendered such material service in 
the great contest just closed that its members can view with pride and 
infinite self-satisfaction a substantial i-ecord, made in the face of the 
difficulties that usually attend the introduction of a new element into 
any old-established system. 

The first instance of the kind referred to which I shall mention 
occurred in October, 1864, and just previous to the commencement of 
the great campaign of General Sherman from the northern part of 



UNION AUTHOBITIE8. 166 

Georgia to the sea-coast. That great leader, whose military genias 
never allowed him to overlook any visible means to aid in secnring 
success, or guard against any and all possible occurrences to endanger 
his plans, in whatever enterprise undertaken, seeing the liability of 
his telegraph wires communicating with his dex)ot of supplies at Alia- 
toona being cut, he established in addition a line of signal communi- 
cation through which he afterward, when the enemy obtained a 
lodgment in his rear and cut his telegraph wires, as was foreseen, 
transmitted his orders and instructions that saved from capture Alia- 
toona, its garrison^ and stores of supplies, the value of which at that 
time and place cannot be computed, as without them' it can well be 
doubted whether the great campaign, which exposed the great weak- 
ness of the enemy and propagated the seeds of the coming dissolution 
of the rebellion, could have been executed for months later. In con- 
nection with this transaction General Sherman states: 

In Beyeraliiifltanoes this corps (Signal Ckxrps) has tnuunnittedordera and brought 
me information of the greatest importance that could not have reached me in any 
other way. I will instance one most remarkable case. When the enemy had cut 
our wires and actually made a lodgment on our railroad about Big ShanJy, the 
signal officers on Vininff's Hill, Kenesaw, and Allatoona sent my orders to Genoral 
Cbise at Rome, whereof General Corse was enabled to reach Allatoona just in 
time to defend it. Had it not been for the services of this corps on tiiat occasion 
I am satisfied we should have lost the garrison at AUatoona and a most valuable 
depositary of provisions there, which was worth to us and the country more than 
the aggregate expense of the whole Signal On^ for one year. 

This will serve to evince the important character of the services of 
the corps at times when operating with the army alone. The follow- 
ing account will demonstrate its eminent usefulness where the army 
and navy operated in conjunction. In the expedition organized to 
attack Fort Fisher in the month of Januaiy of this year, an army 
signal officer was with Admiral Porter, commanding the fleet, and 
oUiers with Greneral Terry, commanding the land forces, who by means 
of signals placed these commanding officers in such immediate com- 
munication that the fire of the navy, which otherwise must have 
slackened after the assault commenced upon the part of the army, 
was kept up without cessation as the enemy was driven from traverse 
to traverse. In this connection Admiral Porter, in a communication 
to the Secretary of the Navy, which induced the latter to tender 
the thanks of the Navy Department to the War Department for this 
efficient agency, states: 

ThrouflAt Hr. Clemens (signal officer) I was in constant communication with 
Qeneral Terry, even during the assault on Fort Fisher, and was enabled to direct 
the fire of the New Ironsides to the traverses occupied oy the enemy, without fear 
of hurting our own people, from my complete rehance on him. 

Thus, through this mobile system of visual telegraphing, the army 
and navy are made to act as a unit. During the war there were more 
forcible instances of this kind than the above, when, in most imx)or- 
tant crises, it would have been imx>ossible for the navy to have ren- 
dered the necessary assistance save through the aid of army signals, 
by means of which its fire was directed to unseen points with almost 
as much facility and certainty as could have been done if the gun- 
ners would have had the object of their aim in view. I would also 
state here that improvements were made during the year in the sim- 
ple cipher apparatus used by the corps in sending secret messages 
which, if they did not absolutely defy deciphering, were of such an 
intricate and complex character that messages sent thereby cannot 



156 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. 

possibly be interpreted by the uninitiated within such period as to be 
of any service to the enemy, even should the messenger fall into his 
hands. 

With these references to special transactions of the corps, and hav- 
ing accorded to its members the merit and thanks so well earned by 
earnest patriotism, by zealous, faithful, and constant exertion to ren- 
der services throughout the war to their country, and by the success 
achieved, and having conceded to them the claim that no class of the 
militaiy was more anxious to be useful, or welcomed with more satis- 
faction additional duties, we will conclude this report by calling 
attention to the necessity for additional action, in order to afford in 
the future to the Army the requisite signal service. 

As experience has clearly demonstrated the eminent advantage of 
having a signal officer attached to garrisons and posts liable to be 
besieged, in order to secure communication over the heads of an 
enemy, should occasion arise, and of having a sufficient number of 
signal officers as a nucleus that would be immediately available in 
the event of future wars, it is submitted that such action should be 
taken by the authorities as would secure for such contingencies the 
properly instructed officers. This can be done in two modes : Either by 
continuing a small permanent organization with specifically defined 
duties, or by detailing a certain number of officers from other branches 
of the service, and directing them to report to the Signal Officer of the 
Army to be instructed, with a view to their being assigned to such gar- 
risons and posts as it may be deemed necessary to provide with means 
of signal communication. 

If the former mode be adopted it is recpmmended that a board of 
officers, more or less acquainted with the past services of this depart- 
ment, be appointed to report the form of the required organization, 
and to define, as far as practicable, the specific duties to he assigned 
it, to avoid in the future the great stumbling-block which was left 
in the way in the past organizatiofi, and which, in many instances, 
crippled the usefulness of the corps by its not being properly under- 
stood what it could do or was expected to do. 

It is presumed that no argument need be presented in favor of a 
new organization, as it is self-evident greater interest would be taken 
in the service, and greater perfection attained in it, than in a simply 
acting corps. 

I have the honor, sir, to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

B. F. FISHER, 
Chief Signal Officer and Colonel, U. 8. Army. 



Circular ) War Dept., Adjutant-General's Office, 

No. 46. j Washington, October f^, 1866. 

orders and instructions relative to the muster out of vol- 
unteer TROOPS, VIZ, ALL CAVALRY (WHIFE) EAST OF THE 
MISSISSIPPI, AND CERTAIN VOLUNTEERS IN VARIOUS ARMIES AND 
DEPARTMENTS. 

I. Cavalry east of the Mississippi. 

Under paragraph V, General Orders, No. 144, Adjutant-General's 
Office, October 9, 1865, the following regiments of volunteer cavalry 
— 4ill of that arm remaining in service east of the Mississippi River^ 



UNION AUTHORITIES. 157 

were ordered mastered out. (Telegram to department commanders 
from Adjutant-General's Office, dated October 16, 1865.) 

Alabama. — First (ten companies). 

Florida. — First and Second. 

lUinois. — Sixth, Seventh, and Ninth. 

Indiaofui. — Thirteenth. 

Massachuaetts. — Fourth. 

Missouri. — Fourth. 

Michigan. — ^Tenth. 

New York. — Second Veteran and Fourth Provisional. 

New Jersey. — Second. 

Ofcio.— Fifth and Twelfth. 

Pennsylvania. — Third Provisional. 

Rhode Jsiand.— Third. 

District of Columbia. — First (squadron). 

II. Troops in various armies and departments — ^services no longer 
required. 

MSMORANDA. 

1. October 9, 1865. — ^Major-General Halleck, commanding Military 
Division of the Pacific, was directed to muster out all volunteers on 
the Pacific Coast, as many as possible immediately, the remainder on 
the arrival of the last battalion of the Fourteenth U. S. Infantry. 

2. October 10, 1865. — Major-General Pope, commanding the Depart- 
ment of the Missouri, was directed to order all CaUfomia Volunteers 
in New Mexico to their State at oncc for muster out. Also, to relievo 
as soon as possible all New Mexican Volunteers, one regiment thereof 
to be mustered out immediately, the remainder on the arrival of cer- 
tain regular troops. 

3. Regiments of cavalry, infantry, and artillery ordered mustered 
out under sx)ecial instructions of dates set opposite the organizations, 
respectively: 

Ohio. — Infantiy: Eighteenth, September 29, 1865. 

Pennsylvania. — ^Artfllery: Third Heavy, October 9, 1865 (General 
Orders, No. 144). 

New York. — Infantry: One hundred and sixty-first (battalion), 
October 9, 1865 (General Orders, No. 144). 

Keniuchy {U. 8. Colored Troops). — Infantry: One hundred and 
twenty-third, One hundred and twenty-fourth, and One hundred and 
thirty-fifth, October 2, 1865. Artillery: Twelfth Heavy (Thirteenth 
Heavy since substituted), October 2, 1865. 

E. D. TOWNSEND, 
Assistant AdjvJtard-Oeneral. 



War Department, Adjutant-General's Office, 

WashingUmy October 20y 1866. 
Adjt. Gen. N. B. Baker, 

Clinton^ Iowa: 
General: Referring to your letter of August 9, inclosing exhibit 
of three-months' men, and referring to certain other troops as not 
credited, I have the honor to state that all men duly and legally 
reported to this office "on report of July 30, 1864," and from "Octo- 
ber 1, 1864, to May 20, 1866," have been reported to the Provost-Mar- 
shal-General of the United States. 



158 COBRESl*ONDENCE, ETC. 

In regard to Iowa men in regiments from other States, I would 
refer to the correspondence heretofore had with your headquarters on 
the subject, and in which the principle was enunciated that no such 
credits could be allowed, except on an adjustment between the Gov- 
ernors of the States concerned. All troops regularly reported from 
October 1, 1864, to May 20, 1865, have been duly credited, and the 
records of the acting assistant provost-marshal-general of the State 
should bear evidence of the fact. Your letter of August 9, with a 
copy of this, has been referred to the Provost-Marshal-General of the 
United States for his action. 

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

THOMAS M, VINCENT, 

Assisiani Adjutant- C^eneraL. 



List of volimteer organizaiions which have 6een, or are ordered to 
6e, miLstered out of service^ not included in previous circulars. 

War Department, Adjutant-General's Office, 

Washingiony October 2J^ 1866, 

Connecticut, — Infantry: Twenty-ninth (Colored). 

District of Columbia, — Cavalry: First. 

i^'^orida.— -Cavalry: First. Second and First East, consolidated 
with First Cavalry. 

/Hmois.— Infantry: Fifty-fourth. Cavalry: Sixth, Seventh, Ninth. 
Men of Ninety-fifth Infantry remaining in service, transferred to 
Forty-seventh Infantry — latter still in service. 

Iridiana, — Cavalry: Thirteenth. 

Kansas, — Cavalry : Companies L and M, Fifth. This completes the 
muster out of the regiment. 

Missouri, — Cavalry: Fourth, Fifteenth, Sixteenth. 

Michigan, — Cavalry: Tenth. 

Massachusetts. — Cavalry: Fourth, Fifth (Colored). 

New York, — Infantry: One hundred and fifty-sixth. One hundred 
and sixtieth, One hundred and sixty-first, and One hundred and seven- 
ty-third. Cavalry: Second Veteran, Fourth Provisional. 

New Jersey. — Cavalry: Second. 

Ohio. — Infantry: One hundred and ninety-fourth. Cavalry: Fifth 
and Twelfth. 

Pennat/Zvania.— Artillery: Third Heavy. Cavalry: Third F*rovis- 
ional. 

Rhode Island. — Cavalry: Third. 

U, S. Colored TVoops.— Infantry: Second, Third, Eighth, Twenty- 
second, Twenty-third, Twenty-fourth, Twenty-fifth, Twenty-eighth, 
Twenty-ninth, Thirty-first, Forty-first, Forty-second, Forty-third, 
Forty-fifth, Seventy-third, Seventy-fourth, Seventy-seventh, One 
hundred and sixth, One hundred and twenty-third, One hundred and 
twenty-fourth, One hundred and twenty-seventh. One hundred and 
thirty-fifth. One company Pioneers. Artillerv: Thirteenth Heaw. 

Note. — Seventy-third Infantry has been heretofore reported consol- 
idated with Ninety-sixth U. S. Colored Troops. Seventy-seventh Infan- 
try has been heretofore reported consolidated with the Tenth U. S. 
Colored Heavy Artillery. One hundred and sixth Infantry has been 
heretofore reported consolidated with Fortieth U. S. Colored Troops. 



UNION AUTH0BITIE8. 159 

General Obdess, ) War Dbpt., Adjt. General's Office, 

No. 165. i" Washington, October 26, 1S65. 

order for discharging certain officers and hen of the 
veteran reserve corps. 

In view of the very numerous and pressing applications for discharge 
by members of the Veteran Reserve Corps, department commanders 
wiU cause all organizations of that corps within the geographical 
limits of their command to be paraded before a general or general 
staff officer as soon after the receipt of this order as practicable. 

Any general or general staff officer on duty within the limits of the 
de2>artment whose services can be spared may be detailed for this 
purpose. The officer will question each officer and enlisted man 
so {traded as to whether he wishes to be discharged or to remain in 
the service, and will make out separate lists of those who wish a dis- 
charge and of those who wish to remain in service. Each list will 
then be read before the officers and men, who will have an opportu- 
nity to correct it, so that it will be a true expression of their wishas on 
the" subject. The officer will visit all those who may be absent from 
the parade, and in a similar manner obtain their wishes and enter 
their names on the proper rolls. 

Hie rolls of officers and men who wish to be discharged will then 
be turned over to the proper commissary of musters, who will imme- 
diately muster out of service those whose names are on the rolls of 
such as desire discharge. He will obtain from regimental officers the 
necessary data, and complete the rolls of those who desire to remain 
in service, so as to exhibit their rank and degree of disability. 
ITiese roUs, when completed, will be forwarded to the Adjutant- 
Creneral. 

Names of officers and men belonging to different companies or reg- 
iments will not be borne on the same rolls in any of the above cases. 
The rolls of those who wish to remain in service, as well as those who 
wish for discharge, will be made on the prescribed blanks for muster 
and descriptive rolls, and will contain full information according to 
the form of the blank. 

Department commanders will see that this order is executed with 
promptness. 

By order of the Secretary of War: 

E. D. TOWNSEND, 
Assistant Adjutant- General, 



CiRcnLAB) War Dept., Adjutant-General's Office, 

No. 47. ) Washington, October 26, 1865. 

The credit of recruits and re-enlisted men of the Regular Army to 
the quota of the States, Territories, and the District of Columbia, 
required to be made by Circular No. 7, February 16, 1865, from this 
office, will be discontinued from and after November 1, 1865, and all 
repoi^ required by said circular to be forwarded to this office, and 
to the Governors and assistant provost-marshals-general of States 
and Territories^ will cease to be rendered from and after that date. 

E. D. TOWNSEND, 
Assistant Adjutant- Ge7ieral. 



160 



CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. 



Hdqrs. Kentucky Vols., Adjt. General's Office, 

Frankfort, October 26^ 1866. 
Bvt. Col. Thomas M. Vincent, 

Assistant AdjviantrOeneral^ Washington, D. C: 
Colonel: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your 
telegram of the 20th instant, and as requested I inclose herein a 
statement of the designation, date of organization, and nnmerical 
strength of troops raised under the authority of the act of Congress 
approved February 7, 1863. These regiments and batteries were 
for twelve months' service, and organized for the better defense of 
Kentucky. At that time (1863) all the Federal forces were required 
at the front, and Kentucky was left in comparatively a defenseless 
position. As the communication with our army, then occupying 
Tennessee, was a matter of great importance, the term of service of 
these troops was fixed at twelve months to induce a speedy organiza- 
tion, as they were intended to keep open that communication. They 
rendered good and efficient service both in Kentucky and elsewhere, 
and many of them availed themselves of the privilege allowed by 
the War Department and re-enlisted. If you desire a statement of 
the expenses incurred by the State in organizing these troops I will 
willingly forward same and any other definite information you may 
desire appertaining thereto. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

D. W. LINDSEY, 
Adjutant- General of KerUucky, 

[Inoloeare.] 

A list of regiments and batteries raised under the act of Congress approved 
February 7, 1863^ authorizing the State of Kentucky to rais^ a force not exceeding 
to ^000 men for one year's service. 



Numerical desi^iuttion of organisation. 



aotli Ren lucky tnfantry . 
,%^t h It^n tuo ky En fii v f,Tj . 
37th Keutiicky Ihfusitry. 
401.1]. Kentut^kv Inlnrary. 
4StL Kc^ntufky Iiif.tiary. 
4Trh Rt^iiturkv Itii.iniry . 
4«th Krntupky l^rniKry. 
4Jnto K^mfiky in ran try. 
frSd Keotuoky Infitntry .. 



Total. 



Date of moater into tlie 
U. S. service. 



Fpb.U to April MSej 


831 


SeK lflt« (.kit 7l9&i 


823 


Se[it 4, J^i6J.U>Ja(i -1.1884 .. 


M7 


Jitly rWf ttj Sf^pt. ;». Iftsa 


833 


0<t. lU, lHe3,laF(»tH,lB«4... 


842 


o< t & t*» itec ^'i, lew, 


7M 


0<t.2t3. IMJ ..„.„ 


836 


Sei»LltttoOrt.7, IMJ 


847 


Oil. le, mOl.toMajch:], 1864. 


7ti0 



III 



7.3S3 



CAVALRY. 



13th Kentucky Cavalry . 



Dec. 23, 1863. 



1.157 



ARTILLERY. 



3fl Kentucky Batterj' (C) a . . . 
4th Kentucky Battery (1)) a . 



Total. 



Sept. 10, 1863 . 
Oct. 6, 1863... 



141 
99 



240 



I Re^enliated for three years. 

D. W. LINDSEY, 
Adjutant'Oeneral of Kentucky, 



UNION AUTHOBITIB8. 161 

State of Omo, Executive Department, 

Columbus, October 27, 1866, 
Hon. Edwin M. Stanton, 

Secretary of War, Washington, D. C. : 
Sm: I inclose an application of Maj. L. G. Marshall, commanding 
Eleventh Regiment Ohio Volnnteer Cavalry, to have his regiment 
mustered out of the U. S. service.* 

I have already, by my letter of the 16th ultimo, expressed so fully 
my views of this whole case — ^the detention of volunteers in a service 
not contemplated by themselves when they enlisted, nor yet author- 
ized by the acts of Congress — that I do not think it now necessary to 
repeat my reasons for these opinions and their consequent demand. 

I should have been pleased to have been informed of the views 
and intentions of your Department in regard to the Ohio Volunteers 
now in the service, in order to have conformed my own action, if con- 
sistent with duty to these citizens, to the designs and convenience of 
your Department. As it is, having failed apparently in procuring an 
assent to my demand for the prompt discharge of all, I can only for- 
ward their applications in detail. 

Very respectfully, CHARLES ANDERSON, 

Oovemor of Ohio, 



6t the President of the United States of America : 
A proclamation. 

Whereas, it has pleased Almighty God, during the year which is 
now coming to an end, to relieve our beloved country from the fearful 
scourge of civil war, and to permit us to secure the blessings of peace, 
unity, and harmony, with a great enlargement of civil liberty; 

And whereas, our Heavenly Father has also during the year gra- 
ciously averted from us the calamities of foreign war, pestilence, 
and famine, while our granaries are full of the fruits of an abundant 
season; 

And whereas, righteousness exalteth a nation, while sin is a 
reproach to any x>eople: 

Now, therefore, be it known that I, Andrew Johnson, President 
of the United States, do hereby recommend to the i>eople thereof that 
they do set apart and observe the first Thursday of December next 
as a day of national thanksgiving to the Creator of the universe for 
these great deliverances and blessings. 

And I do further recommend that on that occasion the whole 
people make confession of our national sins against His infinite good- 
ness, and with one heart and one mind implore the Divine guidance 
in the ways of national virtue and holiness. 

In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused 
the seal of the United States to be affixed. 

Done at the city of Washington this twenty-eighth day of October, 
in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-five, 
and of the Independence of the United States of America the 
ninetieth. 

[l. S.] ANDREW JOHNSON. 

By the President: 

WILLIAM H. SEWARD, 

Secretary of State, 

•Omitted. 
11 B Br-fiERIES m, VOL V 



162 correspondence, etc. 

Engineer Department, 

Washingtarij October SO, 1865, 
Hon. E. M. Stanton, 

Secretary of War, Washington, D. C: 
Sir: I have the honor to present the following report upon the sev- 
eral branches of the pablic service committed to the care of this 
department for the year ending on the 30th of June, 1866: 

CORPS OF ENGINEERS. 

- Dviies of the officers during the year, — The Corps of Engineers con- 
sisted of eighty-five officers, the Military Academy, its officers and 
professors, and the battalion of engineer soldiers of five companies. 

Of the eighty-five officers of engineers embraced in the corps, fifty- 
four were on detached duty commanding army corps, divisions, and 
other military organizations; on staff duty and as engineers and 
assistant engineers with armies operating against the rebels; in com- 
mand of the pontoon-bridge service, and in command of the troox>s of 
the engineer battalion; and thirty-one on duty superintending sea- 
coast defenses, lake surveys, lake and sea-coast harbor improvements, 
Military Academy, and assisting the Chief Engineer in connection with 
all these duties. 

Every officer of the corps has been on continued and uninterrupted 
duty during the entire year, and four of its members have died in 
service. 

The loss in officers killed and who have died in service from wounds 
and other causes during the rebellion is fourteen. 

Twenty-one of the members of the corps still remain on detached 
service performing important duties growing out of the rebellion, 
which prevent their returning to engineer duty. 

The value and estimation in which the military talents and prac- 
tical knowledge of the officers of the corps are held have, by contrib- 
uting to the command of the armies and for staff service, together 
with the loss of those who have given their lives to the defense of their 
country, greatly reduced its numbers and efficiency for the many duties 
devolving upon it. Many of those of highest rank and experience are 
still on detached service, and the vacancies from casualties have neces- 
sarily been filled by junior members, recent distinguished graduates 
of the Military Academy. 

Although the legal strength of the corps is sufficient to perform the 
proper functions of its members, the present assignment of its officers 
renders it impracticable to meet the numerous demands upon the 
department. 

For a comprehensive knowledge of the duties of the engineers, a 
recurrence to the general objects of the campaign is necessary. (See 
plans Nos. 1 and 11.*) 

It will be recollected that by descending the Shenandoah and cross- 
ing the Potomac above Harper's Ferry the rebel army in 1864 
threatened Washington, Baltimore, Pittsburg, and even Philadelphia, 
as also intermediate cities. Washington City had become the great 
depot for immense supplies for all arms of service for months in 
advance. An extensive ordnance depot, a navy-yard, the general 
hospitals, the archives of the Nation, its Executive and judiciary, 
with the public edifices for all national purposes, was the rich prize, 

•Plate LXXXIX, Map 1, and Plate C, Map 1 (revised), of the Atlas. 



UNION AUTHORITIES. 163 

to gain XK)8session of which the rebel authorities directed their efforts, 
as well as to divert our armies from the attack on Richmond. At 
Antietam and Sooth Mountain they had been defeated and driven 
back into the Valley of the Shenandoah. Again they made a pow- 
erful effort and were defeated at Gettysburg and driven across the 
Potomac and up the valley. In July, 1864, after the lieutenant- 
general had forced the rebel armies concentrated under Lee from 
Todd's Tavern, through Spotsylvania and Cold Harbor, into Rich- 
mond and Petersburg, they made another effort to divert the lieuten- 
ant-general by det^hing Early on another expedition down the 
Valley of the Shenandoah and across the Potomac, threatening Bal- 
timore by moving on the Monocacy, where a small body of our 
troops were repufied, thus jeopardizing both Baltimore and Wash- 
ington. The attention of the lieutenant-general was given to these 
efforts of his adversary to divert him from his main object — ^the defeat 
and capture of Lee's army — and, whOe withdrawing part of the gar- 
rison to re-enforce the armies operating against Richmond, he held 
the command of his rear and Washington by being enabled to trans- 
port from before Petersburg as large a force as Lee could detach to 
operate in the valley and on Washington. Many thousands of 
wounded and sick occupied the hospitals in Washington, and the 
troops fit for duty did not suffice to man the armaments of the forts 
around the city. The engineers had previously constructed a system 
of detached redoubts and forts around the city on a circuit of 
upward of thirty-five miles. Early, after his success at Monocacy, 
moved directly upon the defenses of Washington between the 
Potomac and the Eastern Branch. (See plan No. 1.*) Colonel Alex- 
ander, of the Corps of Engineers, was the only officer of the corps 
whose i)ersonal attention could be given to these defenses. Colonel 
Woodruff and Major Kurtz, of the Corps of Engineers, and assistants 
of the Chief Engineer, were first ordered to these defenses. Subse- 
quently all the officers on the sea-coast, north and east of this city, 
were detached from their labors of constructing sea-coast batteries 
(then threatened by rebel iron-clads building in Europe, as another 
effort to divert our armies in the field), and were ordered to the 
defenses of Baltimore and Washington — Major Prime, Captain Rob- 
ert, and Lieut. J. A. Smith to the aid of Colonel Brewerton at Balti- 
more, and Colonel Macomb, Major Blunt, Major Casey, and Captain 
Tardy to the aid of Colonel Alexander at Washington. The rebel 
blow was aimed at Washington. The wise foresight of the Secretary 
of War had caused all the employes of the several bureaus of his 
Department to be organized and drilled as infantry troops. The 
necessity for the withdrawal of the Sixth Army Corps from Peters- 
burg and of the Nineteenth from New Orleans had also been fore- 
seen, and orders sent to them to proceed to this city to meet the blow 
that was threatened. The Veteran Reserves and convalescents from 
the hospitals were also ordered to garrison the defenses. Requisi- 
tions were made upon the Governors of States to furnish troops, but 
with little success. The Sixth and Nineteenth Corps arrived at the 
most opportune moment. Early directed his efforts upon Fort Stev- 
ens, but finding the garrison re-enforced, and even moving out of the 
defenses to meet him, he suddenly retreated across the Potomac and 
up the Valley of the Shenandoah. The engineers were then ordered 
to their former stations on the sea-board. 

•Plate LXXXIX, Map 1, of the Atlas. 



164 COBREftPOKDENCE, ETC. 

Early was parsned by Sheridan with his cavalry and the troops 
that drove him from Washington up the Shenandoah, defeating him 
and his re-enforcements, and eventually annihilating his army. For 
this expedition Major Stewart, Captain Gillespie, and Lieutenant 
Meigs, of the Corps of Engineers, were assigned. In the death of 
Lieutenant Meigs, while reconnoitering in the neighborhood of Win- 
chester, the corps lost one of its most meritorious and valued mem- 
bers. Captain Gillespie accompanied Sheridan's expedition to the 
James River, destroying the rebel communications on that river and 
all others west and north of Richmond, and finally joined the lieu- 
tenant-general before Petersburg. 

With the investment of Petersburg commenced a series of labo- 
rious and difficult engineering operations by the Army of the James 
and the Army of the Potomac. The narratives collated from the 
rei)orts of Colonel Michler and General Michie give the details of 
these operations.* A reference to plan No. 12 will explain the extent 
of the defenses about Petersburg and Richmond and the labors of 
our engineers about Petersburg and the rebel defenses on the north 
side of the James River, f 

The rebels after being defeated by the army under Lieutenant- 
General Grant and driven from their intrenchments around Peters- 
burg, extending to the Hatchie [Hatcher^s Run?], evacuated that city 
on the 2d of April, 1865. The evacuation of Richmond followed on 
the 3d of April, when the rebel army under Lee retreated, and was 
closely pursued and pressed to Apiwmattox Court-House, where it 
yielded to the superior prowess and skill of the armies of the United 
States, on the 9th of April, 1865, thus breaking up all semblance of 
rebel authority, leaving Sherman to end it by the capture of Johnston 
on the 23d of April. A map of this campaign is in progress, awaiting 
information yet to be collected to perfect it as an historical record of 
these ever-memorable military operations which resulted in restoring 
the power and union of a nation. 

After the evacuation of Richmond the rebel chief and his advisers, 
who devised this most unjust and unwarrantable scheme to destroy 
a nation, sought safety in flight toward Georgia. Their movements 
had been foreseen, and were provided for by a brilliant campaign of 
a cavalry force under General James H. Wilson (captain of the O^rps 
of Engineers), who posted his troops with great discrimination and 
judgment, and succeeded in capturing the leader at Irwinton [Irwin- 
ville] on the 10th of May, 1865. 

From Atlanta the grand army of the West, commanded by Sher- 
man, commenced moving for the sea-coast, while Thomas occupied 
Tennessee and Kentucky. The rebels under Hood on evacuating 
Atlanta operated on Sherman's previous line of march. 

The labors of the engineers at Chattanooga under Colonel Merrill, 
and the volunteer engineers, had rendered this important position as 
well as Knoxville impregnable; and Hood retrograded toward the 
Tennessee River with a force so far superior to Thomas' as to cause 
the latter to fall back gradually upon Nashville. The labors of the 
engineers in fortifying Franklin, on the Harpeth River, did not suffice, 
with a single army coTps under Schofield, to hold those intrenchments. 
Our army fell back to Nashville, where much labor and the skill of 
the engineers had previously been bestowed in fortifying it by General 

*For reports of Michler and Michie, see Series I, Vols. XXXVI, XL, XUI, 
XLVI, and LI. 
t Plate C, Map 3, of the Atlas. 



UKIOK AUTHORITIES. 165 

Morion, CJolonel Merrill, Captains Barlow and Bnrrouglis, and other 
junior offioers of the Corps of Engineers, together with volunteer 
engineers. In September, 1864, Major Tower, Corps of Engineers 
(brevet major-general of volunteers), took chaise of these defenses, 
and perceiving the great imx>ortance of Nashville as a depot of sup- 
plies, as well as other important strate^o advantages, commenced 
to add to and perfect the fortifications (see plan No. 4*), on which 
he continued unremittingly until Hood's advance and investment of 
the place on the 15th and i6th of December, 1864 [sic]. 

During the few days preceding Hood's arrival before Nashville, 
Thomas had concentrated his several available army corps within the 
fortifications of Nashville, the plan of which is g^ven on plate No. 4.* 

The importance of these defenses was mainly in enabling Thomas 
to concentrate his army at a depot well stored with munitions of war, 
and to hold his enemy, flushed with his successful march from 
Atlanta, in check until he was ready to take the fleld. 

The accompanying plan of the fortiflcations (No. 4*) by General 
Tower and annexed extracts from his report explain more fully the 
successes of this most important advance of Thomas, resulting in the 
demolition and annihilation of the rebel x>ower in Tennessee. 

During the same eventful period the fortifications that had been 
constructed by the engineers at Murfreesborough were successfully 
held and defended by a part of Thomas' army. 

Colonel Merrill, captain of engineers, with the volunteer engineers, 
had during the year given special attention to fortifying all the 
important points on the railroads in Tennessee and part of Kentucky, 
while Lieutenant-Colonel Simpson, Corps of Engineers, had fortified 
Cincinnati, Ohio; Covington and Newx>ort, Frankfort and LouisviUe, 
Ky., and the Unes of the LouisviUe, Nashville and Kentucky Central 
Railroads, thus covering Thomas' rear and defending his lines of 
communication. 

Such is a general outline of the labors of the engineers in Tennessee. 

The march of the grand army of the West under Sherman (see plan 
No. 3f ) did not call for offensive or defensive fortifications. 

The labors of the engineers. Captain Poe (brevet brigadier-general, 
tJ. S. Army), Captain Reese (brevet brigadier-^neral, U. S. Army), 
Lieutenant Stickney (brevet major, XJ. S. Army)> Lieutenant Ludlow 
(breviet major, U. S. Army), and Lieutenant Dainrell, were most 
advantageously bestowed upon the roads and bridges, and recon- 
noitering the enemy's movements and positions. (See annexed 
narratives.) 

The i)ontoon trains under charge of these oflftcers were indispensable 
to the success of the army, They consisted of canvas boats, which 
proved serviceable for the march of this army from the Tennessee to 
its final disbandment in Washington City in 1865. The advantages 
of these light trains, their frequent use during the campaign proving 
their adaptation to our country, are fully develoi)ed in the narrative 
collated from Poe's and Reese's reports. 

In September, 1863, Knoxville was captured by our force, and in 
November of the same year Chattanooga was occupied by our army. 
At the latter x)oint Sherman concentrated his supplies and moved in 
force against the rebels, driving them through Ringgold, Tunnel Hill, 
Dalton, Besaca, Allatoona, and Eenesaw, to Atlanta. 

* Plate LXXn, Map 2, of the Atlas, 
t Plate LXXVI, Map 2, of the Atlas. 



166 COBRBBPONDENCE, ETC. 

At this latter place the rebel army was strongly intrenched. The 
place was first invested by our army on the north and east, when, its 
strength being fully ascertained, Sherman marched his armv to the 
south, defeating the rebels at Jonesborough and Lovejoy s, thus 
investing it on the south and compelling Hood to evacuate this 
stronghold. 

The annexed narrative, collated from the report of Brevet Brigadier- 
General O. M. Poe, U. S. Army, captain of engineers, gives the im- 
portant incidents connected with its capture, and furnishes plans of 
the rebel defenses. (See plan No. 2*; see narrative annexed.) 
- While these movements and successes of the armies under Thomas 
and Sherman were in progress, Greneral Grant ordered a division of 
his army under Geneml Terry to co-operate with the navy in the 
reduction of the defenses of the mouth of Cai>e Fear River in January, 
1865. 

Captain Comstock, of the Corps of Engineers (lieutenant-colonel, 
aide-de-camp, brevet brigadier-general of volunteers), had charge of 
title engineer operations of this expedition. 

Fort Fisher, situated at and commanding the northern entrance of 
this river, was found to be the key of the position. Plans Nos. 5 and 
6f give the details of the defenses constructed by our army to cover 
its landing and its rear while operating on Fort Fisher. 

A boml^rdment by the fleet, resulting in dismounting many of the 
guns on the land front of the work, as well as cutting the electric 
wires for exploding a formidable system of mines on the same front, 
preceded a successful assault by the troops under General Terry. 

The accompanying plans Nos. 5 and G, with extracts from General 
Comstock's report, give the details of the rebel fortifications and those 
thrown up by our troops. (See General Comstock's report, annexed.) 

Later in the season General Canby concentrated the troops under 
his command and moved to the attack of the city of Mobile, having 
the co-operation of the navy. The labors of the engineers under 
Captain McAleeter (brevet major, *tJ. S. Army), Captain Palfrey 
(brevet lieutenant-colonel, U. S. Army^, Lieutenant Bumham (brevet 
major, U. S. Army), and others, were here called into requisition. 

Blakely (see plan No. 7 J) was invested, batteries constructed and 
opened upon the formidable rebel batteries covered by strong intrench- 
ments, with abatis surrounding their entire position, with its flanks 
resting on the Blakely River. 

Plan No. 7, with extracts from the report of Major McAlester, gives 
the details of the operations, flnal assault and destruction of the 
rebel defenses on the 8th of April, 18G5. (See McAlester's report, 
annexed.) 

Spanish Fort was at the same time invested by our army, and the 
more formidable siege operations of a first and second parallel vrith 
approaches and enfilading batteries became necessary, and resulted 
finally in the capture of the rebel defenses by assault, on the 8th and 
9th of April, 1865. (See plan No. 8.§) 

These defenses and approaches are given in detail on plans Nos. 7 
and 8, which, with extracts from Major McAlester's report, will 
explain and illustrate this well-designed and skillfully executed siege. 

•Plate LXXXVm, Map 1, of the Atlas, 
t Plate LXXV, Maps 1 and 2, of the Atlas. 
1 Plate LXXI, Map 14, of the Atlas. 
gPlate LXXIX, ^p 7, of the Atlas. 



UNION AUTHOamES. 167 

The fall of Blakely and Spanish Fort caused the rebel army under 
Taylor, Gardner, and Maury to evacuate Mobile, and retreat to the 
north. 

Plan No. 9* g^ves the formidable rebel defenses of the city of 
Mobile, surrounding it with three lines of detached forts and con- 
necting intrenchments, with the flanks resting on Mobile River. The 
skillful labors of the rebel engineers about this city were very exten- 
sive and the system exceedingly strong. 

The determination of the commanding general to turn these works, 
by first reducing Blakely and Spanish Fort, proved successful, and 
the character of the works as shown on the plan forcibly illustrates 
the saving of lives and treasure in not first attempting to reduce these 
powerful defenses. 

Plan No. lOf gives the x>osition of the entire and connected sys- 
tem of rebel defonses that succumbed to the skill and talent of 
Canby. 

While these imiwrtant operations were in progress in Tennessee 
and Alabama, Sherman, with the grand army of the West, and Lieu- 
tenant-General Grant, with the combined Armies of the Potomac and 
the James, together with the garrison of Washington City, were 
simultaneously leading the national forces to strike a final blow to 
rebel power, and enforce the restoration of national authority from 
the Atlantic to the Pacific. (See plan No. 3.|) 

Sherman's army reached the sea-coast, by first capturing Fort 
McAllister, on the 13th of December, 1864, by Hazen. The strong 
rebel intrenchments at Savannah were then invested, and the rebel 
General Hardee driven from them across the Savannah River. The 
department has as yet received no plans of Fort McAllister or of the 
d^enses of Savannah. The labors of the engineers of Sherman's 
army (see Poe's narrative) were again bestowed principally in recon- 
noitering the enemy's positions, and maneuvering the canvas pontoon 
trains to cross the army over the several rivers between Savannah 
and the last wateivcourse crossed in pursuit of rebels. The success 
of these bridge trains is given in the extracts from Generals Poe's 
and Reese's reiwrts. The city of Charleston fell into our power on 
tiie 18th of February, 1865, after its evacuation by the rebels in con- 
sequence of Sherman's movements in its rear, and cutting off its 
supplies from the interior, while it was already blockaded by our fieet 
and invested by land by our army. 

Schofield, after the reduction of the entire defenses of Smithville, 
moved upon Raleigh, and united his forces with those of Sherman. 
The engineer operations on this line were in reconnoitering and 
maneuvering the pontoon-bridge trains for the passage of the rivers, 
under Lieutenant Stickney (brevet major, U. S. Army), of the Corps 
of Engineers. (See Stickney's narrative.) After oostinately con- 
tested combats at Averasborough and Bentonville, the rebel power 
under Johnston was finally overcome and subdued by the capture of 
his entire command on the 23d [26th] of April, 1865; after which, by 
easy marches, the grand army of the West repaired to Washington 
City. (See plans Nos. 1, 11, and 12. §) 

The momentous campaign of the armies under the command of the 
lieutenant-general, with the purpose of capturing Richmond, and 

* Plate CV, Map 1, of the Atlas. 

f Plate LXXI, Map 18, of the Atlas. 

i Plate LXXVI, Map 2, of the Atlas. 

gPlates LXXXIX, Map 1; C, 1 and C, 2, of the Atlas. 



168 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. 

overthrowing the rebel authorities holding the semblance of Confed- 
erate power in that city, was commenced on the Rapidan in May, 
1864. The battles of Todd's Tavern, on the 7th of May; of Spotsyl- 
vania, on the 14th and 19th, and passage of the North Anna, on the 
24th; of Ck>ld Harbor, on the dlst of May and 1st of June; the march 
thence and passage of the James River on the 16th, 17th, and 18th, 
with the investment of Petersburg on the 3d of July, 1864, constitute 
a brilliant series of grand battles and maneuvers that do not oope 
within the scope of engineer reports. 

The annexed narrative and information from the reiwrt of Colonel 
Michler, dated October, 1865, give more specifically the labors of the 
offtcers of the Engineer Corps during the progress of this campaign. 

SEA-COAST AND LAKE DEFENSES. 

While most of the offtcers of the Corps of Engineers have been 
actively engaged in the field, as heretofore stated, others have given 
their attention to the importont labor of sea-coast defenses. 

Against predatory expeditions of rebel cruisers and iron-armored 
vessels, built in foreign ports claiming to be neutral, it was necessary 
to construct batteries to mount rifle artillery and smooth-bored 
ordnance of heavier calibers than heretofore used. Colonel Macomb, 
Major Blunt, Major Casey, of the Corps of Engineers, were employed 
in thus fortifying thirteen harbors on the Eastern coast. At the same 
time progress on the x>ermanent sea-coast defenses was continued at 
all the harbors from Maine to Hampton Roads, inclusive, at Key 
West and Tortugas, and at San Francisco; and repairing the perma- 
nent works on the Gulf of Mexico that were taken from the rebels, 
which had been more or lees injured by them and by our attacks, to 
restore them to the Union. On the Northern and EEbstem works, as 
also on the California coast, the main object has been so to direct the 
operations as soonest to mount the contemplated armaments, which, 
at this time, are required to be of such penetrating and crushing 
power as will in all probability insure the destruction of any iron- 
armored vessels that can combat them. The introduction of these 
increased calibers and this power of artillery has made it necessary 
to renew most of the gun platforms heretofore constructed, which were 
designed for no larger caliber than 42-pounders. At the present time 
no smaller gun is prepared for the sea-coast batteries than 100-pounder 
rifle guns, and ten to fifteen inch rifled and smooth-bored guns. 

The further construction of the sea-coast batteries has been retarded 
by the necessity which now exists of so covering part of our guns and 
gunners as to render them secure against any advantage that an 
attacking power in iron-armored ships opposed to them shall {wssess. 
So far as we have yet progressed, preparations for guns of large 
caliber have been perfected, and the guns mounted to throw, collect- 
ively, 147,150 pounds of metal at a single discharge, which is an 
addition during the year of 40,651 x)ounds of metal that can be so 
thrown against an enemy. 

Continuing to increase the armament on our sea-coast in the same 
ratio for a reasonable time will render the harbor defenses exceed- 
ingly difficult for any maritime power to overcome, and, in combina- 
tion with other auxiliary means of defense, will carry the cost and 
time requisite to subdue them beyond the means of foreign powers, 
provided we hold our works in a x>erf ect condition for bot£ laiid and 
sea attacks. 



UNION AUTHORITIES. 169 

Boards of engineers have been detailed to consider what modifica- 
tions are necessary at each and every work along onr sea-coast to 
adapt them to resist the powerful armaments that Enropean fleets, 
singly or combined, may be Enabled to bring across the Atlantic, 
oyer the bars of onr ports and harbors, to attack them. 

The details of the opejations during the year at the several works 
on the Atlantic, Gulf of Mexico, Lake and Pacific Coasts, derived 
mostly from the reports of the superintending engineers, are annexed. 

PRISON DEPOTS. 

The prison depots also called for the labors of engineer officers. 
Point lAX>koat, at the mouth of the Potomac, was subject to sudden 
attack from marauding parties and detached cavalry from armies 
operating against Baltimore and Washington, which, with the 
immense body of prisoners, made it necessary to fortify the position 
against attempts to liberate them by forts commanding both the 
interior and exterior. Major Stewart, assisted by Lieutenant Cant- 
weU, and afterward Colonel Brewerton, constructed these defensive 
works. 

THE PRISON DEPOT AT JOHNSON'S ISLAND. 

Cleveland Harbor, Lake Erie, had to be defended against attempts 
of the prisoners, and succor by water from expeditions organized in 
the friendly and neutral territories of Great Britain in Canada. 
Major Casey and Captain Tardy were assigned to and i>erf ormed this 
service, constructing a water battery at the mouth of the harbor, 
against a force approaching by water, and temporary field forts on 
Johnson's Island. 

SURVEYS, MAPS, AND TOPOGRAPHY. 

The surveys for the armies in the field, embracing the topography 
of the country passed over and particular sites occupied, have been 
referred to in other parts of this report. 

The extent of the labors i)erf ormed by the officers on duty in the 
Bureau has been the engraving, lithographing, photographing, and 
issuing 24,591 sheets for officers in the field and various branches of 
the service requiring this information, leaving still on hand a few 
copies of each publication for reference and the calls of the War 
Department. 

The survey of the northwestern lakes has been in progress for sev- 
eral years, to obtain for the commerce of the States whose industry 
is promoted by that extended interior navigation the safety that a 
perfect and correct knowledge of the shores and bottom alone can 
attain. It is being conducted under the direction of Major Raynolds, 
of the Corps of Engineers, upon the same scientific principles and 
with the same care and accuracy that has been bestowed upon the 
coast survey and other national geodetic surveys. During the year 
two maps have been preiMred from the field-notes published and 
issued to the navigators of the lakes. One gives the west end of 
Lake Superior and the other the northeastern part of Lake Michigan. 
Three others have been prepared and are now ready for engraving, 
giving the Portage River and the Bay of L'Anse, on Lake Sux>eriory 
and a third giving the north end of Green Bay. 



170 CORRESPONDEKCEy ETC 

Two thousand eight hundred and twenty sheets of the maps of the 
lake surveys have been issued for commercial, harbor improvement, 
and military purposes during the year, making the whole number of 
maps called for and issued since these surveys were commenced 27,411 
sheets. 

Special surveys have also been made during the year, maps issued 
and forwarded for the use of the department, of Niagara River, Erie, 
Conneaut, Ashtabula, Grand River, Cleveland, Black River, San- 
dusky, Saint Joseph's, Grand Ilaven, Chicago, Racine, and Sheboygan. 

SURVEYS. 

The principal labors of the jwrties engaged in these surveys during 
the year are comprised in the measurement of 269^ miles of shore- 
line, 164^ square miles of topography, 187 miles of soundings, and 
1,200 square miles of offshore hydrography on 1,586 miles of lines of 
soundings; the measurement of a base line of 4,173 feet in length; 
difference of longitude between several distant points by electric 
observations, and observations by flashing lights; also astronomical 
observations for the latitude of eight points. 

Becommendation, — These survej's are called for by numerous par- 
ties and individuals, as well as by commercial men, for private as 
well as for public use. It is indispensable that some rules and system 
be established to keep the issue of these valuable maps within such 
limits as will insure the great objects of the survey, the diffusion of 
this information to promote national industry, at the same time to 
prevent them faUing into the hands of persons collecting for other 
purposes than the public good. I recommend that the department be 
therefore authorized to issue these maps, after supplying the wants 
of the Government, at the cost of paper and printing, as is now and 
for years i)ast has been authorized for distributing the Coast Survey 
maps. This will prevent an improper use, and enable all i>ersons 
capable of using them to obtain copies. 

The estimate for caiTying on the work for the next year is $184,604.42, 
which exceeds the amount appropriated for last year's operations 
about $60,000. It is proper to say that this increase of estimate does 
not contemplate any advance in the wages of assistants, but is simply 
due to the increased cost of materials and supplies. 

On our Pacific Coast Major Williamson, of the Corps of Engineers, 
has explored and reconnoitered parts of Northern California and South- 
ern Oregon, giving the topography of its roads, and continues obser- 
vations for barometric correction of altitudes, having also in view an 
investigation of the formula for determining heights by this instru- 
ment. He has traversed and explored the heights of the Nevada 
Range in Northern California, said to be 10,000 to 11,000 feet above 
the level of the sea, and the military roads between the coast and this 
range of mountains to facilitate the military operations of the com- 
manding general. During the year he also examined the various 
sites on Admiralty Inlet and Puget Sound, that might hereafter 
become useful for military purposes, and selected such as should be 
reserved from sale by the Land Office. 

PRESERVATION AND REPAIR OF ATLANTIC HARBORS AND SEA-WALLS. 

An appropriation was made in 1864 for renewing the construction 
of the sea-walls in Boston harbor to preserve the headlands from 
further destruction by the ocean waves, and, as a consequence, injury 



UNION AUTH0BITIS8. 171 

to the harbor for commercial use, while at the same time it preserves 
important sites that hereafter will be occupied by batteries bearing 
on the channel leading to the city of Boston. The following narra- 
tives of the operations on these islands are drawn from the report of 
Colonel Graham, the superintending engineer. The same officer was 
charged with the application of the appropriation of $100,000 for the 
preservation and repair of the harbors on the Atlantic. The accom- 
panying summary gives his views on this subject in relation to the 
Susquehanna River below Havre de Grace, dredging the Patapsco 
River, Portland Harbor breakwater, navigation of the Hudson River 
helow Troy, and Delaware Breakwater. Colonel Graham recommends 
additional appropriations for the Atlantic harbor improvements.* 

MILITARY ACADEMY. 

During the past year sixty-eight cadets completed their studies and 
military exercises at the Academy, and were commissioned as lieuten- 
ants in the Army. This is the most numeroiis class that has ever 
graduated at the institution since its organization in 1802. For many 
years the number of graduates has not sufficed to All the annual 
vacancies in the Army. 

The number of officers in the several branches of the staff, and of 
regiments now comprising the Regular Army, has greatly increased 
from time to time, while the number of cadets authorized by law has 
remained unaltered since 1843. llie result is that neither the staff 
corps, nor regiments of artillery, cavalry, and infantry, can be fur- 
nished with the numbers to perfect their comi>any oi^anizations, and 
military science and art cannot be disseminated throughout the coun- 
try in proportion to the increase of population and national interest!^ 
to be protected. The total number of cadets now at the Academy is 
235, and the total number authorized by existing laws is 293. From 
various incidents to which the appointments are subject, this ratio 
does not materially alter from year to year. 

The average cost of the institution for the last twenty years has 
been $160,711.83. The cost during the past academic year was 
$201,217. These sums include the pa}' of cadets, officers, and pro- 
fessors, and all contingencies. 

The annual average appropriation for twenty years is $166,684.63, 
and for the present year is $257,505. This excess arises from the 
increase of the pay of cadets, and for increase cost of forage for artil- 
lery and cavalry horses, &c. 

RecommendcUions. — To meet the wants of the military service, and 
to diffuse a knowledge of the science and art of war more extensively 
throughout our widely extended domain, I recommend at this time an 
increase in the total number of cadets of two additional apx)ointments 
from each State and Territory and the District of Columbia, thus 
making the number of appointments to be authorized under the law 
to be one from each Congressional district and Territory and the 
District of Columbia, ten from " at large ^ annually by the President's 
selection, and two in addition from each State and Territory and the 
District of Columbia. 

The difficulties that have been exx)erienced for years xiast in train- 
ing the minds and bodies of the young gentlemen sent to the Academy 

•For portion of this report relating to river and harbor improvements, here 
omitted, see Executive Document No. 1. House of Representatives, Thirty-ninth 
CoogTess, first session, Vol. II, pp. 921-925, of said document. 



172 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. 

to prepare them for usefulness as members of the military profession 
arise mainly from the qualifications of the candidates being so exceed- 
ingly limited. While at the present time it may not be expedient to 
increase the standard for admission, I do urgently recommend that a 
selection from at least five candidates to be nominated for each 
apx>ointment may be authorized by law, when every section of the 
country would more certainly have its due proportion of graduates, 
entering the Army annually. Should this principle be authorized by 
law, the examination of the candidates could be ordered in several sec- 
tions of the country at convenient military x>ostiS, and thus save a 
great annual expense now incurred by partially educating and return- 
ing deficient cadets to their distant homes, insure a much greater 
proportion of members who could master the course of studies, and 
avoid the numerous and frequent discharges from the Academy for 
inability to acquire the requisite information and proficiency for a 
graduate of this institution. 

FINANCES. 

Daring the year ending Jnne dO, 1805, the expenditures of the 
deputment for fortifications on the Atlantic, Gnlf of Mexico, 
Pacific Coast, and on the Northern Lakes, including bridge trains, 
intrenching tools, and for all other military purposes, amounted to. $5, 174, 885. 28 

For civil works, as lake harbors, harhors on the Atlantic, survey of 
the lakes, they amotmted to 218,400.00 

And for the Mintary Academy, not including the pay of professors 
and cadets 86,685.00 

Making a total annual expenditure of 5,479,420.23 

The accounts of the disbursing officers of the department have 
been regularly forwarded from month to month. These accounts had 
accumulated in the department duriag the past four years beyond the 
means allotted to the financial branch to examine, correct, and for- 
ward to the Treasury Department for final settlement. 

During the year l,203monthly accounts, amountingto$ll,834,308.35, 
have been thus examined and forwarded to the Auditor for final set- 
tlement, and there remain on hand at this time 398 monthly accounts 
to be examined, amounting to $4,492,964.85. At the rate of progress 
made during the past year in the examination of these accounts the 
work in a short time will be brought up to the months in which they 
are received from the officers. No defalcation or losses in any way 
exist in the disbursements and accountability of the officers of the 
department. 

At the present time all property purchased for the armies in the 
field, either worn or of a perishable character, is being sold, and the 
. avails will be returned to the Treasury. The amount of sales to this 
date is $34,123.12. The residue of this property is being stored in 
engineer depots for further use, at the Jefferson Barracks depot. Mo., 
and at the WiUets Point depot, N. Y., under charge of engineer officers 
and troops of the Engineer Battalion. 

The property of the department in the hands of its agents is 
accounted for quarterly, and the returns examined in this Bureau. 

The number of returns examined during the year is 220 

And remaining to be examined 43 

Making the number of property returns rendered by officers 268 

RICHD. DELAFIELD, 

Oeneral and Chief of Engineers U. 8. Army. 



UNION AUTHORITIES. 173 

Narrative collated from the reports of Col, N, Michler.* 

>» * « « « 41 « 

Upon the explosion of the mine [July 30, 1864] and failure of the 
assault the troops engaged were directed on the following day to 
resume their previous x>ositions to a great extent, some few changes 
being ordered for the purpose of reducing their fronts and establishing 
reserves for ulterior movements. The plan of the siege by regular 
approaches having been abandoned, Colonel Michler was directed at 
the same time to ^^make such a disx>osition of the lines then occupied 
by the corps as would enable them to be held by a diminished force," 
and therefore determined to select an interior line, to consist of some 
few detached, inclosed works, subsequently to be connected by lines 
of infantry x)arapets. The first line selected was one lying on very 
commanding ground, and extending from the present Fort Sedgwick 
to the Rushmore house, immediately opposite Fort Clifton, one of 
the enemy^s works on the Appomattox, at the head of navigation for 
lai^e sea-going vessels, passing near the Avery, Friend, Dunn, and 
Jordan houses. This being considered too far to the rear of the then 
advanced position, and apparently yielding too much ground, for the 
possession of which such desperate fighting had taken place, he 
finally chose an intermediate one, and sites for Forts Rice, MeUcel, 
Morton, Haskell, Stedman, and McGilvery were selected, and the 
intervening batteries and lines located. It had also been decided to 
enlarge and strengthen the lunette, the site of which is now occupied 
by Fort Sedgwick. By direction of Lieutenant-General Grant the 
supervision of the line in front of the Eighteenth Corps had also 
been placed under his direction. The construction of these different 
works was pushed rapidly forward by night, under the immediate 
charge of Captains Gillespie and Harwood and Lieutenants Howell, 
Benyaurd, and Lydecker, as much so as the sparsity of officers, the 
extreme heat of the weather, and the heavy and constant artillery 
fire of the enemy would permit. 

Several officers of the Corps of Engineers, including Captains Men- 
dell, TumbuU, and Farquhiu*, had been ordered away from the army 
on other duty, and some of the lieutenants were absent on sick leave. 
By the 20th of August the works were so near completion as to be in 
readiness for the contemplated movement on the Petersburg and 
Weldon Railroad. After the successful advance and holding of that 
most imx>ortant thoroughfare he was directed to select positions for 
large works on or near that road for the protection of the left flank 
of the army, and also to connect them, by a system of redoubts, with 
Fort Sedgwick. On the 26th of August, in connection with the dis- 
position of troops then made, orders were given him to "proceed at 
once to the construction of the redoubts proposed for the left of the 
line on the Weldon railroad, and of the works at the Burnt chimney 
and the Strong house," now designated Forts Dushane, Wadsworth, 
Howard, and Alexander Hays. 

The construction of these works and intermediate batteries, con- 
nected by infantry parapets, was immediately commenced, under 
the more immediate charge of Lieutenants Howell, Benyaurd, and 
Lydecker, and was afterward turned over to Captains Folwell and 
McDonald, Fiftieth New York Volunteer Engineers. Owing to the 

*The portion of this narrative here omitted is covered bj fall reports published 
in Series I, Vols. XXXVI and XL. See also Series I, Vols. XLII, XLVI, and LI, 
for reports of later operations. 



174 CORBESPONDENCE, ETC. 

bad condition of the roads daring the late move, the commanding 
general directed that a line should be selected for a military railroad 
from the depot at City Point to the intersection of the Weldon rail- 
road, at or near the Yellow Tavern, for the more certain and rapid 
transportation of supplies. The laying of this road was placed in 
charge of the construction corps of the chief quartermaster of the 
Armies operating against Richmond. The soil contains a great quan- 
tity of sand, and at times becomes almost impassable. 

By the 7th of September the interior portions of the works last 
referred to were well advanced, sufficiently so to be occupied in case 
-of an attack by the enemy, and obstructions, consisting of wire 
entanglements, abatis, fraises, and slashing generally of the timber 
along the entire front, had been prex)ared. Many miles of corduroy 
roads and bridges had been built by the Fiftieth New York Volunteer 
Engineers for the convenience of and more direct communication 
between the different corps of the army. ' 

During the first few days of September he also selected sites for 
different works, and traced a line from the bastion works (Fort 
Dushane) on the Weldon railroad to the rear of the camps of the 
armies operating against Petersburg, its left resting on the Black- 
water Swamp, near Fort Bross. These were designed to guard against 
any movement of the enemy on the three large and important thor- 
oughfares — ^the Jerusalem plank, the Norfolk stage, and Halifax roads. 
The several redoubts then laid out and commenced were subsequently 
named Davison, McMahon, Stevenson, Blaisdell, and Kelly. 

In his report for the week ending on the 17th of September he 
reported that along every portion of the line, from the Appomattox 
River, below Petersburg, to the Weldon railroad, and thence back to 
the Blackwater Swamp, work was progressing rapidly. The length of 
the line at that time was over sixteen miles, and along it had been 
constructed, or were in course of construction, nineteen forts and 
redoubts and forty-one batteries. In addition to the labor on these 
works, including the obstructions m their front, bombproofs, maga- 
zines, and drainage in the interior, nearly 2,000 yards of roads and 
one-third of the covered ways had been "corduroyed," and 6,700 
square feet of substantial bridging built. The old intrenched lines 
were also being leveled. These labors were continued during the 
following week, the officers and men of the regular battalion of engi- 
neers and of the Fiftieth New York Volunteer Fngineers having the 
construction of them. At the same time his attention, under instruc- 
tions from the commanding general, was directed to the examination 
of the country in I'eference to a defensive line from Blackwater 
Swamp, near Prince George Court-IIouse, north toward Old Court- 
House, on Bailey\s Creek, the latter a deep, impassable stream, 
emptying within a few miles of that point into the James River. 

This line, in connection with that already in course of construction, 
completed the chain of works from the Appomattox, below Petersburg, 
to the Weldon railroad, and thence back to the James River, adding 
nine miles to its length, making twenty-five miles in all, the flanks 
resting on the two rivers, and with them entirely encircling the Army 
of the Potomac. (See plan No. 12.*) 

The sites of five works were traced, and work commenced iipon three 
of them. At the same time he was directed to confer with Lieutenant- 
Colonel Benham, Corps of Engineers (brigadier-general of volunteers), 
in command of the immediate defenses of City Point, in regard to a 

* Plate C, map 2, of the Atlas. 



UNION AUTHORITIES. 175 

short line extending from the Court-House, on Bailey's Creek, north 
toward the Appomattox, to cover and protect against any sudden 
attack of cavalry the depot at that point. 

On the 2l8t a circular from headquarters Army of the Potomac 
directed that *Hhe armaments and garrisons designated for the forts 
be regarded as i>ermanent, to be moved only when specially directed." 

By the 26th the military railroad was completed, opened for travel, 
and placed in charge of the provost-marshal-general of the army. 

On the 28th, in company with the chief of artillery, he made a gen- 
eral inspection of the whole line and found the work progressing 
most satisfactorily. During the evening of the same day orders were 
issued for certain dispositions and arrangements of the troops to be 
made, and that the whole army should be in readiness to move before 
daylight on the following morning. The corps commanders were 
directed to "hold in view the contingencj'' of the withdrawal of their 
troops from the rifle-pits connecting the inclosed works, leaving the 
line from the Appomattox to Fort Davison to be held by the redoubts 
and inclosed batteries, and the further contingency of withdrawing 
entirely from the intrenchments." 

In consequence of this projected movement, instructions were 
immediately given to the officers of engineers to suspend aU oper- 
ations on the different field-works in course of construction, and to 
hold their commands and the pontoon trains in readiness to obey 
further instructions. 

The active operations of the army were successfully advanced some 
few miles to the left or west of the Weldon railroad during the 29th 
and 30th of September and 1st and 2d of October, causing a corre- 
sponding extension of the lines. On the morning of the latter, after 
the repulse of the enemy in his final attack, it having been determined 
to hold on to the i)osition, he was ordered to select a new line to con- 
nect the advanced point near the Pegram house with Fort Wadsworth, 
and locate the necessary intermediate works. The tracing, profiling, 
and construction of them was immediately commenced. 

Before daylight on the morning of the 4th, by direction of the com- 
manding general, he made a reconnaissance for the purpose of selecting 
a line to be refused from the left flank toward the rear, and to be 
connected with Fort Dushane. The sites of several new redoubts 
were established, the connecting lines traced, and with large details 
their construction immediately commenced. 

By this extension to the west of the Weldon railroad eleven addi- 
tional inclosed works — Keene, Urmston, Conahey, Fisher, Welch, 
Gregg, Cummings, Sampson, Emery, Siebert, and Clarke — and several 
batteries were linked with the already formidable cordon that sur- 
rounded the army. The length of this portion of the line is nearly 
seven miles, making a continuous stretch of twenty-three miles of 
earth- work from the right, on the Appomattox, to the left, on the Black- 
water Swamp. Adding to this the section from the latter to the James 
River, the line measures more than thirty-two miles, comprising 
thirty-six forts and fifty batteries. In addition to these, there were 
eight other inclosed works along the inner line of the defense of City 
Point. 

The incredibly short time in which those to the west of the Jeru- 
salem plank road were built surprised the officers of our own army. 
The sites of the works were only selected on the 2d and 4th of the 
month; still, the weekly rex>ort of the 8th states that they were already 
nearly completed. 



176 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. 

To the officers of the Corps of Engineers then present, under his 
orders — ^Harwood, Gillespie, Howell, Benyaurd, Lydecker, and Phil- 
lips — ^and to those of the Fiftieth New York Volunteer Engineers, 
under the immediate command of Lieut. CoL I. Spauldins, and to 
the men of their respective detachments, must be given the credit 
for the immense amount of work accomplished. 

The works were well constructed and finished, and the infantry 
parapets are as strong as they could be made to answer a useful pur- 
pose. The artificial strength of the line was to a great extent increased 
by the naturally strong position chosen to resist any attack or assault 
by the enemy. 

On the 4th of the same month, notwithstanding the few officers of 
the corps that remained on duty, he was compelled to send Lieutenant 
Phillips to report to General Benham to assist in constructing the 
line in front of City Point; the latter was about three miles in length, 
comprising eight small redoubts. 

On the 12th the commanding general directed Colonel Michler to 
make an examination of that part of the line extending between 
Forts Hays and Fisher, to ascertain whether said line could be 
shortened, and to furnish a written report for Lieutenant-General 
Grant's information. As no particular advantage could be gained 
and a considerable amount of work would be required, he rexx>rted 
unfavorably. 

The weekly report dated October 22 informs the General-in-Chief 
"that the whole line occupied by the Army of the Potomac was 
entirely constructed and in a defensible condition. Some minor 
details still required attention. Additional obstacles, palisades, and 
fraises in connection with the abatis and wire entanglements had 
been rapidly pushed forward every night to strengthen it." In con- 
sequence of reports that the enemy were driving galleries at dif- 
ferent x>oints to undermine several works, he directed shafts to be 
sunk within them and listening galleries to be run out as precaution- 
ary measures, although no indications were found to exist after a 
most careful personal examination. 

On the 16th, accompanied by Captain Gillespie and Lieutenant 
Benyaurd, he examined critically the ground between Fort McGilvery 
and a point opposite Fort Clifton, to ascertain the strength of the 
enemy's position, and whether any new works were in course of con- 
struction, as well as to decide upon the possibility of forcing a 
passage of the river and severing his communication by rail with 
Richmond. 

On the 20th, by direction of the commanding general, he visited 
City Point in company with the medical director of the army for the 
purpose of selecting the ground for a general field hospital. An 
advantageous place was found on the bluff overlooking the James, 
between the railroad and Bailey's Creek. Besides the convenience of 
locality, it possessed the advantage of retirement and security, as 
well as that of health. Fine springs burst forth here and there from 
the banks sufficient to supply every want. 

The names of the different works of the line to the west of the 
Weldon railroad and of that in front of City Point were selected 
from among those of the many distinguished officers who were killed 
in action during the recent eampaifims, nobly fighting their country's 
battles, and so given in plan N 

•Plate -^ 



UNION AUTHOEITIBS. 177 

On the morning of the 24th of October two new redoubts were 
ordered to be thrown np at points he had previously selected, the one 
between the Norfolk road and the Aveiy house, the other near the 
Friend house, from both of which positions command was had over 
the main line of works. These were sufficiently far advanced for the 
movement ordered to commence on the afternoon of the 26th. The 
latter, in which the greater part of the army participated, continued 
through the 27th and 28th, extending west across Hatcher's Run, 
and reaching along and south of it as far as the Boydton plank road 
where the latter crosses the stream at Burgess' Mill. 

During the afternoon of the last day the different commands 
returned to their old camps. The engineer troops were then engaged 
along the entire line, in repairing damages, adding obstructions, 
driving galleries, and in every conceivable way rendering the line as 
strong as possible. 

On the 7th of November he was directed by the major-general com- 
manding the Army of the Potomac **to furnish General Benham, 
commanding defenses of City Point, with the project of the line of 
intrenchments from Prince George Court-House to Old Court-House, 
and also to indicate what was necessary to be done to connect the 
right of that line with the rear intrenchments resting on the Black- 
water." 

In consequence of a contemplated movement he had been com- 
pelled to susi>end work ux>on that section of the defensive line, and 
its construction was subsequently turned over to the above-named 
officer. 

By the 12th of the same month, the lines being completed, both as 
regards their external and internal arrangements, the foUowi^ig 
extract from Si)ecial Orders, No. 306, headquarters Army of the 
Potomac, of the same date, was issued for the information of all 
concerned: 

The attention of corps commanders is called to the necessity of preserving, in 
good order, the intrenchments front and rear, with the abatis, slashings, and 
other defenses. 

• • • • * • • 

The chief engineer officer will inspect the lines, both front and rear, from time 
to time, and report to these headquarters any f aUure to keep the same in good 
order, or any destmction of the defenses. 

From this time forward the engineer troops were principally occu- 
pied during the winter in attending to the needed repairs of the forts 
and batteries, in keeping in order the several corduroy roads, in over- 
hauling and placing in good condition the pontoon trains, in con- 
structing huts for winter quarters, and in building stabling for the 
large number of animals required for the transportation of the tool 
and bridge trains. 

The temporary quiet of the army was again interrupted for several 
days. On the 6th of December, by direction of the commanding gen- 
eral, an engineer officer, with a battalion of engineer troops and 150 
feet of canvas bridging, was directed to accompany the Fifth Corps 
during the movement of the latter south along the Weldon railroad, 
and subsequently all, both regular and volunteer, were called upon 
to be under arms to take part in the same operation. Orders were 
issued at the same time that all cami)s located, as well as huts, corrals, 
or other structures erected in the vicinity of the lines of defense, 
either in fi<ont or rear, which, in the judgment of the engineer, inter- 
fered with the proper defense of the works, should be immediately 

12 B B — SERIES UI, VOL V 



176 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. 

To the officers of the Corps of Engineers then present, under his 
orders — ^Harwood, Gillespie, Howell, Benyaurd, Lydecker, and Phil- 
lips — and to those of the Fiftieth New York Volunteer Engineers, 
nnder the immediate command of Lieut. CoL I. Spauldine, and to 
the men of their respective detachments, must be given tiie credit 
for the immense amount of work accomplished. 

The works were well constructed and finished, and the infantry 
parapets are as strong as they could be made to answer a useful pur- 
pose. The artificial strength of the line was to a great extent increased 
by the naturally strong position chosen to resist any attack or assault 
by the enemy. 

On the 4th of the same month, notwithstanding the few officers of 
the corps that remained on duty, he was compelled to send Lieutenant 
Phillips to report to General Benham to assist in constructing the 
line in front of City Point; the latt^er was about three miles in length, 
comprising eight small redoubts. 

On the 12th the commanding general directed Colonel Michler to 
make an examination of that part of the line extending between 
Forts Hays and Fisher, to ascertain whether said line could be 
shortened, and to furnish a written report for Lieutenant-General 
Grant's information. As no particular advantage could be gained 
and a considerable amount of work would be required, he reported 
unfavorably. 

The weekly report dated October 22 informs the General-in-Chief 
"that the whole line occupied by the Army of the Potomac was 
entirely constructed and in a defensible condition. Some minor 
details still required attention. Additional obstacles, palisades, and 
fraises in connection with the abatis and wire entanglements had 
been rapidly pushed forward every night to strengthen it." In con- 
sequence of reports that the enemy were driving galleries at dif- 
ferent points to undermine several works, he directed shafts to be 
sunk within them and listening galleries to be run out as precaution- 
ary measures, although no indications were found to exist after a 
most careful personal examination. 

On the 16th, accompanied by Captain Gillespie and Lieutenant 
Benyaurd, he examined critically the ground between Fort McGilvery 
and a point opposite Fort Clifton, to ascertain the strength of the 
enemy's position, and whether any new works were in course of con- 
struction, as well as to decide upon the possibility of forcing a 
passage of the river and severing his communication by rail with 
Richmond. 

On the 20th, by direction of the commanding general, he visited 
City Point in company with the medical director of the army for the 
purpose of selecting the ground for a general field hospital. An 
advantageous place was found on the bluff overlooking the James, 
between the railroad and Bailey's Creek. Besides the convenience of 
locality, it possessed the advantage of retirement and security, as 
well as that of health. Fine springs burst forth here and there from 
the banks sufficient to supply every want. 

The names of the different works of the line to the west of the 
Weldon railroad and of that in front of City Point were selected 
from among those of the many distinguished officers who were killed 
in action during the recent campaigns, nobly fighting their country's 
battles, and so given in plan No. 12.* 

♦Plate C, map 2, of the Atlas, 



UNION AUTHOEITIES. 177 

On the morning of the 24th of October two new redoubts were 
oideied to be thrown up at points he had previously selected, the one 
between the Norfolk road and the Avery house, the other near the 
Friend house, from both of which positions command was had over 
the main line of works. These were sufficiently far advanced for the 
movement ordered to commence on the afternoon of the 26th. The 
latter, in which the greater part of the army participated, continued 
through the 27th and 28th, extending west across Hatcher's Run, 
and reaching along and south of it as far as the Boydton plank road 
where the latter crosses the stream at Burgess' Mill. 

During the afternoon of the last day the different commands 
returned to their old camps. The engineer troops were then engaged 
along the entire line, in repairing damages, adding obstructions, 
driving galleries, and in every conceivable way rendering the line as 
strong as possible. 

On the 7th of November he was directed by the major-general com- 
manding the Army of the Potomac **to furnish General Benham, 
commanding defenses of City Point, with the project of the line of 
intrenchments from Prince George Court-House to Old Court-House, 
and also to indicate what was necessary to be done to connect the 
right of that line with the rear intrenchments resting on the Black- 
water.'* 

In consequence of a contemplated movement he had been com- 
pelled to suRx>end work upon that section of the defensive line, and 
iU construction was subsequently turned over to the above-named 
officer. 

By the 12th of the same month, the lines being completed, both as 
regards their external and internal arrangements, the followipg 
extract from Special Orders, No. 306, headquarters Army of the 
Potomac, of the same date, was issued for the information of all 
concerned: 

The attention of corps commanders is called to the necessity of preserving, in 
good order, the intrenchments front and rear, with the abatis, slashings, and 
other defenses. 

* « • • * • • 

The chief engineer officer will inspect the lines, both front and rear, from time 
to time, and report to these headqnarters any failnre to keep the same in good 
order, or any destruction of the defenses. 

From this time forward the engineer troops were principally occu- 
pied during the winter in attending to the needed repairs of the forts 
and batteries, in keeping in order the several corduroy roads, in over- 
hauling and placing in good condition the pontoon trains, in con- 
stracting huts for winter quarters, and in building stabling for the 
large number of animals required for the transportation of the tool 
and bridge trains. 

The temporary quiet of the army was again interrupted for several 
days. On the 6th of December, by direction of the commanding gen- 
eral, an engineer officer, with a battalion of engineer troops and 150 
feet of canvas bridging, was directed to accompany the Fifth Corps 
daring the movement of the latter south along the Weldon railroad, 
and subsequently all, both regular and volunteer, were called upon 
to be under arms to take part in the same operation. Orders were 
issued at the same time that all cami)s located, as well as huts, corrals, 
or other structures erected in the vicinity of the lines of defense, 
either in front or rear, which, in the judgment of the engineer, inter- 
fered with the proper defense of the works, should be immediately 

12 B B— SERIES ni, VOL V 



178 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. 

removed. Preparations were also made to move, if necessary, all 
surplus property and the sick in hospitals to within the lines of City 
Point. Arrangements in regard to the further disposition of troops 
were directed in the event of a general move; those not previously 
designated for holding the intrenched lines to be formed into a mov* 
able column, under the immediate orders of the commanding officer of 
the Second Corps. All work not necessary for the defense of the 
position held by the army was suspended. The movement had 
scarcely commenced when, in consequence of severe storms of rain, 
accompanied with sleet, the army was finally compelled to return to 
its old position, some considerable damage having been effected 
along the line of the railroad. 

Comparative quiet again reigned throughout the army, with the 
exception of the attempt of the enemy's iron-clads to come down the 
James River on the 24th of January, 1865, until the 4th of February, 
when a movement of the cavalry was ordered for the following day, to 
be supported by the Fifth and Second Corps. The cavalry success- 
fully captured a small train of the enemy on the Boydton plank road 
and entered Dinwiddie Court-House. In consequence of the destruc- 
tion of a bridge over Hatcher's Run, the Fifth Corps was detained for 
several hours in crossing, and the former, not being supported, fell 
back. A severe attack was made upon the Second Corps, but was 
repulsed, and little more was effected on that day. On the following 
morning (6th) the Fifth Corps was ordered to pass the stream at the 
crossing on the Yaughan road and take up position to the left of the 
Second, the cavalry protecting its flank. 

Some severe fighting took place during the day. Early on the same 
morning he had been sent to select a line between Fort Sampson and 
Armstrong's Mill, and choose sites for works to hold and command 
the crossing at the latter place and the one on the Yaughan road. On 
the 7th orders were issued to intrench the line, but on the following 
day were so modified as to cause the line to be run direct from Fort 
Sampson to the Yaughan road crossing. The length of this addition 
to the intrenched line is nearly four miles, making the front line from 
the Appomattox to Hatcher's Run fifteen miles of continuous earth- 
works. Heavy storms of rain and sleet again disturb^ this movement. 

With the exception of the attack on Fort Stedman on the 25th of 
March, and its temporary occupancy by the enemy, no event of 
importance occurred until the inauguration of the campaign on the 
28th of the same month. The distance from Battery No. 10, adjoin- 
ing Fort Stedman, to the point of the enemy's line (Colquitt's salient), 
immediately opposite, is only 613 feet between the main works, the 
shortest distance between the two at any point, excepting at Elliott's 
salient (the locality of the mine). The picket-lines of the two armies 
were only 435 feet apart, those of the enemy only a few feet in front 
of his main works. One of the advanced Union pickets was only 
separated 205 feet from his opposite neighbor, a narrow boyau leading 
to his pit from the main line. Without the exercise of the most 
untiring vigilance on the part of the picket and the garrison, any 
sudden dash at the first early dawn of the morning might prove 
momentarily successful; but a x>osition so well fianked by adjacent 
batteries, and commanded by others in its rear, proved so untenable 
as to cause the enemy to be most severely punished for his temerity, 
and to compel him to relinquish the object of an attack for which no 
reasonable explanation can be made. 



UNION AUTHORITIES. 179 

Before proceeding further lie calls attention to the topographical 
department of the Army of the Potomac. 

Owing to the limited degree of information which conld be obtained, 
either from published maps or inquiries made of the inhabitants — 
the latter generally being averse and in most cases unable from igno- 
rance to impart it, even in relation to the particular localities in which 
they lived — his assistants had a laborious although an interesting 
duty. They have not only been constantly engaged in following up 
every movement, and in most cases acting as guides to the different 
columns of troops, thereby obtaining a most reliable knowledge of 
the country by actual exi>erienoe, but have been compelled to antici- 
pate the geographical wants of a large army ever in motion by con- 
stant and careful researches. 

In order to be able to furnish the necessary data upon which to base 
the different military combinations, and thereby being made respon- 
sible to a great extent for the information upon which the command- 
ing general was able to hypothecate a reasonable degree of success in 
the execution of his plans, the department had necessarily to be 
ever active and always exact. 

The Engineer Bureau has been furnished from time to time with the 
many maps supplied the officers of armies operating against Rich- 
mond and Petersburg, including those of the campaigns from the 
Rapidan to the Appomattox; that of the carefully surveyed plan of 
the lines occupied during the siege of Petersburg; the several sheets 
representing the country adjacent to the latter city, and also about 
Richmond, comprising the several lines of the enemy for the defense 
of the capital; and also copies of those prepared in anticipation, and 
upon which were based the movements which terminated so success- 
fully and gloriously the last grand campaign of April, 1865. 

On the 27th of 5larch certain movements of the several corps of 
the Army of the Potomac were ordered to commence at an early hour 
of the 29th. On the 28th the instructions of the previous day were 
somewhat modified, but at the appointed time the several columns 
were in motion. 

A pontoon train accompanied the Fifth Corps to enable it to cross 
Hatcher's Run, and subsequently remained there for the passage of 
the general trains. The Second Corps, which had been replaced by a 
portion of the Twenty-fourth along the intrenched line heretofore 
occupied by it, crossed by the bridge on the Yaughan road. The 
cavalry passed over by a bridge still farther down, at Malone's Cross- 
ing, and moved toward Dinwiddle Court-House. 

In gaining their position but little opposition was encountered; one 
division of the Fifth had a spirited engagement on the Quaker road, 
and handsomely repulsed the enemy. 

On the 30th the Second and Fifth Corps advanced their lines to 
beyond the junction of the Quaker and Boydton plank roads, driving 
the enemy into his main works; the two lines were within easy artil- 
lery range; the right of the Second now rested on Hatcher's Run, 
near the Crow house. A division of the Twenty-fourth Corps crossed 
the run and connected the right of the Second with the tdte-de-pont 
on the Yaughan road; both lines were intrenched. 

During the night previous and throughout the whole of this day the 
rain poured down in torrents. The roads had become impassable for 
wagons and artillery, and the engineer troops were engaged in cordu- 
roying them and in rebuilding bridges over Hatcher's and Gravelly 
Runs. 



180 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. 

The wagon train stock fast in the mud. The cavalry had to be 
sent back by divisions to the terminus of the military railroad to 
replenish their supplies of rations, the wagons not being able to come 
up to them. 

During the night of the 30th the Second Corps extended its front to 
the left along the Boydton plank road, resting its flank on Gravelly 
Run. On the morning of the following day an unsuccessful effort 
was made by the Fifth Corps to drive the enemy from the White Oak 
road; subsequently, upon being re-enforced, the attack was renewed 
and possession gained of that road. 

Toward evening the cavalry had repulsed and held in check, in front 
of Dinwiddle Court-House, a superior force of the enemy. During 
the night of that day, the 31st, the Fifth Corps was sent to the assist- 
ance of the cavalry. From the commencement of the movement he 
had accompanied the commanding general over different parts of the 
field, in readiness to execute such instructions as might be given, and 
on the 1st of April, by his direction, rode along and inspected the 
lines from Hatcher's Run toward the west. The evening of that day 
witnessed a most brilliant engagement on the left, in which both the 
cavalry and the Fifth Corps participated, the enemy along that imme- 
diate front having been completely routed. 

This glorious news was communicated throughout the army, and 
orders were issued that a simultaneous attack should be made at dif- 
ferent points along the entire length of the intrenched line at 4 o'clock 
on the following morning. The grand assault of the 2d of April was 
made, and the exterior line of the enemy's works x>enetrated and pos- 
session gained of the larger portion of them. 

The enemy having been pierced at his center and divided, one 
portion was driven within an interior line of works immediately 
encircling the city, and the other moved off from the White Oak 
along the Claiborne road, rapidly pursued by a division of the Second 
Corps. The line of the army extended at noon of that day from the 
Appomattox, above Petersburg, to the Appomattox below, the two 
flanks resting on the river. 

Colonel Michler was at that time ordered to rectify this line if neces- 
sary, and later in the day to select a site for a pontoon bridge across 
the river, and positions for batteries to command the crossing and 
protect passage of the army in the event of the retreat of the enemy. 

Early on the morning of the 3d it was ascertained that the enemy 
had evacuated the city of Petersburg, and orders of march were imme- 
diately issued to the different corps to follow in pursuit. The roads 
were found in wretched condition, and a great deal of corduroying 
and bridging had to be done. About noon on the 5th he was ordered 
to proceed in advance of the Second and Sixth Corps to report to 
General Sheridan, who had arrived with the cavalry and Fifth Corps 
at Jetersville on the previous evening, to consult with him in regard 
to the position to be taken by the army in anticipation of an exx)ected 
attack by the enemy, it being reported that his whole force was con- 
centrating at Amelia Court-House. His line of retreat toward Dan- 
ville had been cut off, and it was presumed he would venture a heavy 
battle to regain it. In company with the general he rode over the 
line, and by the direction of the general the troops were posted as 
they arrived. A part of the line of battle had been previously 
intrenched, and work was commenced on other portions; the antici- 
pated fight, however, did not take place. 

On the following day (6th) the Army of the Potomac was put in 
motion in three parallel columns toward Amelia Court-House to 



UNION AUTHORITIES. 181 

attack the enemy, but the cavalry having early ascertained that he 
was endeavoring to escape by Deatonsvillo toward Farinville, the 
direction of the line of march was immediately changed; the Second 
moved directly on the former place and in a short time came upon and 
commenced a brisk skirmish with the retreating force and continued 
to drive him until night closed the operation; the Fifth Corps was 
shifted to the right flank and took the road to Paineville. 

Colonel Michler was directed to report the change of movement and 
explain its object. to the commanding officer of the Sixth Corps. His 
column was countermarched and thrown from the right to the left 
flank. After retracing its steps through Jetersville and passing some 
two miles beyond the village, it left the main turnpike and followed 
a road which he had found leading toward the northwest, and by 
which the troops moving along it were absolutely certain of striking 
the flank of the retreating army. The entire cavalry force was oi>er- 
ating on the -same flank. 

By night the battle of Sailor's Creek was fought, which will long be 
rememl^red as one of the most brilliant and successful affairs of the 
war. It was, in fact, the last de8i>erate engagement between these 
two armies. 

On the 7th of April the pursuit was continued. The enemy having 
succeeded in crossing the Appomattox at Farmville and High Bridge, 
he succeeded in destroying all the bridges at the former place, but 
failed in his efforts to damage the common road bridge at the latter 
crossing; three spans of the railroad bridge (Richmond and Danville 
road) were burnt; this structure is 2,400 feet long and 125 feet high. 
The enemy made some slight resistance at both these places and also 
on the Lynchburg plank road at a point about four miles beyond 
Farmville. 

The naturally very strong position at High Bridge was rendered 
additionally so by several redoubts which had been built there some- 
time previous for the protection of the bridge against cavalry raids. 

On the 8th the Second and Sixth Corps followed along the Stage road 
to Lynchburg, whilst the Fifth, Twenty-fourth, and Cavalry Corps 
pursued the one by Hampden Sidney College and Prosx>ect Stations 
toward Appomattox Court-House. 

During the day he returned to Farmville to hasten the construction 
of some additional pontoon bridges and rejoined the major-general 
commanding on the main road. On the previous evening Lieutenant- 
General Grant had demanded the surrender of General Lee to avoid 
the further effusion of blood. No skirmishing had taken place during 
the day, although the one army was close on the rear of the other. 

About noon on the 9th, in consequence of the negotiations in regard 
to the surrender which were pending and exchanged under flags of 
truce between the generals commanding the respective armies, the 
advance of the Army of the Potomac, still engaged in pursuit, when 
within three miles of Appomattox Court-House was ordered to halt 
and await the issue of the proceedings. The other column had, by 
rapid marching, succeeded in passing around and confronting the 
head of that of the enemy at the latter place. 

The few hours of anxious suspense were happily compensated by 
the glorious tidings which were soon proclaimed throughout the army 
announcing "the surrender of the Army of Northern Virginia." 

On the following day the army commenced a retrograde movement 
toward Burke's Station, where it remained in camp until ordered to 
take up its final march toward Washington, D. C. 



182 COBBESPONDENCE, ETC. 

On the 14th of April Colonel Michler was detached from the staff of 
the commanding general of the Army of the Potomac, and directed, 
in conformity with instructions from Lieutenant-General Grant, to 
proceed to Petersburg, in order to examine and direct military sur- 
veys of the respective intrenched positions held by the two opposing 
armies during the siege and prepare plans of the same, combined with 
a detailed and accurate topographical map of the adjacent country; 
also to assume charge of the surveys of the different battle-fields and 
lines of operations from the James River to Appomattox Court-Hoose. 

By the 30th of June, the termination of the fiscal year for which 
this report is called, the field-work had been far advanced, but in 
consequence of the necessity of continuing during favorable weather 
the survey of the several hundred square miles through which it 
extends, little or no office duty was accomplished — only sufficient 
drawing to answer necessary purposes at the time; and consequently 
the maps at that time were not sufficiently far advanced, and could 
not exhibit the large amount and the nature of the work accomplished. 



Narrative collated from reports of Major MendeU, 

PONTOON TBAINS. 

The companies of the U. S. Engineer Battalion with the Army of the 
Potomac were under the immediate command of Major MendeU, of 
the Corps of Engineers, with Captain Tumbull, Lieutenants Macken- 
zie, Benyaurd, Howell, Cuyler, and Heap, whose services, with the 
men under their command, are given in Major Michler*s reports. 

The pontoon trains for service in the field, and to accomi>any the 
several army corps, were under the command of Lieutenant-Colonel 
Spaulding, of the Fiftieth New York Volunteers. The services ren- 
dered by this branch of the Engineer Department were indispensable 
to the success of the army. Without these transportable bridges 
the armies could not have moved through a country intersected with 
numerous rivers, wide and deep, and oftentimes with rapid currents, 
as well as ebb and fiood tides. The material of this branch of our 
service is modeled from the French wooden trains and the Russian 
canvas trains. These trains, particularly that with light canvas boats, 
have, during this war, for the first time been proved advantageous and 
efficient and adapted to our country. They have been very generally 
used by the armies in the West and South, as well as the armies in the 
East. The officers having charge of these trains and their construc- 
tion have devised and adopted many useful modifications in the 
details. Lieutenant-Colonel Spaulding has added much to these 
modified improvements. The accompanying tabular statement from 
his report will exemplify the use and value of this indispensable 
branch of the engineer service.* 

From the above statement it appears that the total number of pon- 
toon bridges built was thirty-eight, and their aggregate length 6,458 
feet. 

During the whole time covered by this report he believes the pon- 
toon trains have been promptly on time when ordered, the bridges 
rapidly and skillfully built, and all other engineering operations of 
the command faithfully performed. 

*See Series I, Vol. XXXVI, Part I, p. 816. 



UNION AUTHORITIES. 183 

Whatever credit may be awarded to this is mainly dae to the energy 
and skill of the officers in immediate charge of the several works, and 
to the zealous and faithful co-operation of the men under their com- 
mand. 



Narrative from the report of LietU. P. 8. Michie, Corps of EnaineerSj 
brevet brigadier-general of volunteers^ to General Delafieldy Chief 
Engineer U. S. Army, dated October 10, 1865. 

(See plans 11 and 12.*) The Army of the James, consisting of the 
Tenth and Eighteenth Army Corps (and subsequently of the Twenty- 
foart.h and Twenty-fifth), commanded by Maj. Gen. B. F. Butler, 
oocapied a defensive position across the peninsula of Bermuda Hun- 
dred on a line 6,058 yards long, its right resting on the James River 
about one mile below the Hewlett house, and its left on the Appo- 
mattox River, on the high ground across the creek, from and on the 
high ground overlooking Port Walthall. 

This defensive line, from its position, was unusually strong. With 
its flanks resting on and protected by two rivers, and its front of 
attack being diminished to about one-fourth of its length, because of 
impassable ravines, it was capable of being held by a much inferior 
force than the enemy were required to keep in its front. But it had 
also its disadvantages; for the enemy intrenched on a line approach- 
ing not nearer than 800 yards, with flanks as secure as ours, and a 
front made unassailable by means of all the obstacles known to field 
defense, and thus effectually closed to our forces there every avenue 
to do damage to the railroad and turnpike, which were the lines 
of communication to the wings of the rebel army and the avenues 
to their capital. The position of the two lines is given below in the 
sketch. 

In addition to the line above described there was a strong work 
thrown up on Spring Hill, on the south side of the Appomattox River, 
just opposite Point of Rocks, and also strong works at Wilson's Wharf 
and Fort Powhatan, on the James River, all of which were con- 
structed and garrisoned by detachments from this army. 

These latter commanded the channel of the river at very important 
points, and on their occupation depended the uninterrupted supply of 
the '^Armies operating against Richmond." 

Brig. Gen. Godfrey Weitzel, U. S. Volunteers, captain U. S. Engi- 
neers, was the senior engineer of this army until October, 1864, but in 
consequence of his illness, in August, the duties of his office devolved 
upon General Michie. 

Jidy. — ^No engineering operations of any importance were carried 
on during this month. Attention was principally directed to 
strengthening the lines already laid out, in building water batteries 
for 100-pounder guns for the defense of Trent's Reach, and in general 
repairs to the line. During this month there was constant picket 
firing all along the front, constant surprises on the part of both forces 
of the picket-lines, and attempts to gain ground toward each other. 

A signal tower 120 feet high was built at Point of Rocks, from the 
top of which could be seen the Richmond and Petersburg Railroad 
and turnpike. This gave us the means of obtaining a great deal of 
information, and must have impressed the enemy with this idea, for 
they established a casemated battery of three Whitworth rifled field 

* Plate C, Maps 1 and 2, of the Atlas. 



184 



CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. 



gans for the special purpose of firing at this tower. But one shot of 
all fired at it struck it, and that only splintered one of the posts with- 
out damaging the tower itself. 




August. — On the 3d of August a pontoon bridge 560 feet long was 
built on the Appomattox River at Broadway Landing for the passage 
of the Second Army Corps. 



UNION AUTHORITIES. 185 

A second signal tower 126 feet high, and capable of being made 40 
feet higher, was built on the right flank of the line, on the high bluff 
known as "Crow's Nest," James River, opposite Aiken's. From the 
top of this could be seen the Richmond and Petersburg turnpike and 
the cross-roads connecting the main roads which ran to Richmond on 
the north side of the James River. A lookout constantly stationed 
here gave information of the enemy's movements. 

Major-Greneral Butler having conceived the idea of cutting a canal 
across the peninsula known as Dutch Gap, to pass iron-clads and 
other war vessels through to avoid Trent's Reach and the Hewlett 
Battery, and the idea receiving the warm support of the then com- 
mander of the navy in the river, a survey of the locality was made by 
his direction. 

From the sketch given below it will be seen that the river widens 
from 400 feet at the Hewlett house to 2,700 at Trent's Reach. As a 
consequence, at the latter place the channel becomes narrower and 
shallower, and at ordinary high water vessels drawing twelve feet 
ten inches of water can x>ass under favorable circumstances, but the 
channel was effectually blocked by the powerful battery (Dantzler) at 
the Howlett house, which had a plunging Are upon the whole channel 
from Trent's Reach up to within a few hundred yards of the Howlett 
house. This battery had also embrasures cut to look up the river, to 
give a fire in rear in case any vessel was successful in passing the 
heavy fire of its front. 

The survey of Dutch Gap showed a center section line 522 feet long, 
from a point in the channel on the south to a point in the channel on 
the north, 15 feet deep. The highest point on this center line was 
38.5 feet above high- water mark, and the lowest 4 feet, which was at 
the south mouth. On a line 60 feet from this center line, on either 
side, the ground rose to 42.8 feet at the north mouth, and to 11.4 feet 
on the south. The difference of water level was 10.1 inches, taken at 
extreme low tide, thus showing the natural fall of the river between 
these points to be 2.13 inches to the mile. To all appearances the 
soil offered no insuperable difficulties for excavation, although it was 
rumored that the James River granite, which outcropped a mile 
above the lower mouth and a mile and a half below, would be met 
with beneath the upper strata and cause a complete failure. 

The strata met with were as follows, viz: Yellow Virginia brick clay 
for twelve feet; layer of coarse sand and gravel, two to four feet; half 
an inch to two inches bog-iron ore; layer of pebbles and large gravel, 
two feet; then hard blue clay, or hardpan, containing a large quan- 
tity of sulphuret of iron or iron pyrites. This latter stratum was 
never exhausted, and the bottom and sides of the canal were chiseled 
out of this, presenting as smooth and compact a surface as if built 
with masonrj'. In round numbers, there were about 48,000 cubic 
yards to be excavated — ^the canal to be sixty feet wide at high water, 
forty feet wide at bottom, and fifteen feet deep. 

It is a question whether this project — one of the simplest in civil 
engineering — ^would have been of any advantage other than to bring 
our navy a few miles farther up the river; for after it was commenced 
it was well known that other and nearly as powerful batteries lined 
both banks of the James River, commanding almost impassable 
obstacles, and ready to do their share in disputing the passage to the 
rebel capital. And besides, it was an ascertained fact that the river 
was filled with torpedoes of the most delicate construction, most pain- 
ful evidence of which we had in the destruction of three of our vessels 



186 



CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. 



in reaching the position then occupied. If any advantage could have 
accrued to us from this canal in a military point of view, it would be 
a maximum only by keeping it a profound secret. 




The excavation being ordered to proceed, ground was broken on 
the 9th of August, and immediately thereafter the enemy began the 
constant annoyance with their rifle and morta-r batteries, which ended 



UNION AUTHORITIES. 187 

only with the suspension of labor on the canal, January 1, 1865. 
There were thrown in the vicinity of the working parties over 20,000 
shells during the whole period of the work. The canal was excavated 
mainly by soldiers and partly by dredges. The latter were old and 
almost worn out, and were worked by civilians, who did not come up 
to their promises, being driven off and frightened by the enemy's 
shells. Not more than 6,000 to 7,000 cubic yards were removed by 
the dredges, which were pi*omised to remove 400 cubic yards every 
ten hours. They worked from the south mouth 200 feet up into the 
canal, where an embankment separated the part on which the soldiers 
were working from the lower half. 

The whole canal, except an embankment at the north mouth to 
protect against direct firing, was excavated to the required dimensions. 
The soil was ver^' favorable below high-water mark. It was the * ' hard- 
pan" of miners — ^a hard, stiff, blue clay, perfectly impervious to and 
insoluble in water. Whatever leakage took place through the strata 
of sand and gravel was removed by a steam pump. 

About the middle of December the mines which had been made in 
the embankment were nearly completed. This embankment was 
much larger than was intended to be blown out with powder, for it 
had been General Michie's endeavor to reduce it far below what would 
have been almost certain to be removed, but during his absence the 
water had been let into the excavated part and up to the embankment 
without orders. It would have required a greater amount of labor 
and length of time to remove it than we were warranted to use at this 
period. 

It remained then only to do the best to blow out the mass between 
the water in the river and that in the canal; and the problem became 
to use an amount of powder large enough to remove the embankment 
and disturb its foundation so that it would be easy to remove after- 
ward and, at the same time, not so much as to disturb and cave 
down the walls of the canal in the vicinity. Twelve thousand pounds 
of powder were divided among five mines — one of 4,000 and four of 
2,000 each — distributed as follows : Three mines were placed at a depth 
of fifteen feet below high water, one of 4,000 being on the center .line 
of the canal and thirty-five feet from the face of the embankment, 
and two of 2,000 each were placed on the same level ten feet on each 
side of the center line and twenty-five feet from the face. Two remain- 
ing were at a depth of twenty-five feet below high-water mark, or ten 
feet lower than the three first, and twenty feet farther out than the 
central mine toward the channel on the north side. 

Toward the time of charging and tamping the mines the water 
leaked in very rapidly and the pumps were kept going night and day. 
The powder in the four smaller mines was in tin cans holding 126 
pounds each. In the larger mine the powder was in four large rubber 
bags holding 800 pounds, all opening into a water-tight box which con- 
tained 800 pounds, and in the center of which was the point of fusion 
of this mine. 

The method of exploding the mines was by means of the Gomez fuse, 
a quick-burning composition said to be instantaneous for distances 
under 100 feet. This method proved defective, and the results showed 
conclusively that all of the powder did not bum, and will not when 
ignited in the center of large mines. The effect would, in General 
Hichie's opinion, have been several times greater if centers of fusion 
could have been made for every hundred pounds of powder, which can 
be done now with an electric apparatus. 



188 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. 

In the method used, iu the center of each charge was placed the end 
of a length of Gomez fuse, cut at different points to allow the flame 
to ignite the powder in several places. This fuse was then grafted to 
an equal length in the same level running to the other mine. The 
three mines in the upper level were joined in the same way and, finally, 
the two lines were grafted together and joined to the end of a piece 
of slow-match cut to bum twenty minutes. The grafts had been tried 
repeatedly before being finally determined on, and had always been 
successful. 

On exploding the mine the embankment was thrown down and a 
current commenced running through the canal. Excavation by means 
of discharging cans of powder underwater deepened and widened the 
channel, aided by strong freshets, so that at high water six and a half 
feet of water is on the embankment. General Butler having been 
relieved from the department about this time, work was discontinued 
by order. 

The canal at present is used by the steamer O. S. Pierce and others 
of that class, which save by this way about five miles and a half of 
travel. A few days' work to clear up the disturbed mass and to widen 
and deepen the north mouth would make this the usual traveled route 
by all vessels navigating the river. The current and tide partly fiow 
through this way, but their action is unimportant in clearing it out, 
because the debris consists of large lumps of cemented gravel and 
hard blue clay. The above embraces all the data of interest in this 
much-talked-of project, and is given complete to avoid referring to it 
in the account of each month's labor. 

September. — During this month a line of works was built and a post 
established at Harrison's Landing. The defensive works consisted of 
a redoubt of four embrasures, with a stockaded gorge commanded by 
the gun-boats in the river, and infantry breast- works running from the 
flanks to the river. The length of the whole line is 1,412 yards. A 
canvas pontoon bridge of twenty-three boats was built on the Appo- 
mattox River September 19. Tbe pontoniers who built it, having no 
experience with these boats, were twelve minutes in building the first 
and three minutes in building the last, the average time being seven 
minutes and a half for each lK)at. Owing to the river being aflfected 
by the tide, the claw balks had to be lashed to the saddle piece, or 
they would slip up or down, according as the tide was ebb or flow. 
Often this bridge had to be covered with manure to deaden the sound 
of travel when troox)S crossed. In these cases the dust of the manure 
falling into the canvas boats would rot the threads of the canvas and 
cause more or less leakage. It was noticed that some of the canvas 
coverings would leak as much as six inches of water at night and none 
the following day. Teams heavily loaded would often sink these boats 
to within four inches of the gunwale. These were among the most 
prominent things noticed in the use of these boats in a permanent 
bridge, a use, however, for which they were never intended. 

During the night of September 28 a pontoon bridge 1,320 feet 
long was built on the James River at Aiken's Landing. Svith 100 
pontoniers the bridge was finished in six and a half hours, so quietly 
as not to disturb the enemy's pickets on the opposite side of the river. 

The army began to cross at 3 a. m. September 29 in two columns, 
one on the bridge above spoken of and the other on the bridge at 
Deep Bottom. A successful advance was made; Fort Harrison, the 
key point of the outer line of Riclimond defense, carried by assault, 
and the line of works extending to the Darbytown road occupied by 



UNION AUTHORITIES. 189 

our army. It havinpj been determined to remain in the position thus 
carried, the rebel works from Fort Harrison to the New Market road 
were occupied by our trooxw and their front turned during the night 
and following day. Shortly afterward a line was thrown up, with 
batteries at appropriate intervals, extending from our left flank, at 
Fort Harrison, to the James River, where it rested on a large work at 
a point a little above Cox*s Landing. This work, called Fort Brady, 
was on the site on which the rebels had commenced the erection of a 
powerful rifled battery to command the mouth of the canal. We 
armed the work with three 100-pounder Parrott guns and several 
4|-inch Rodman rifles, constructed a large bombproof for the protec- 
tion of the garrison, and surrounded it by strong lines of abatis. The 
line from this work to Fort Harrison afforded a secure defense in case 
of a flank attack on the left, as it subjected the attacking party to a 
chance of being defeated, cnt off, and captured, or driven into the 
river, after leaving their own lines. 

October, — Efforte were early made to strengthen the right flank by 
a strong line and redoubts, but the work was stopped by order from 
the then commander of the Tenth Army Corps. A strong attack on 
this flank was made by the enemy in force on the 7th of October, 
which the cavalry who guarded this flank were unable to withstand, 
and which at one time threatened to be very disastrous to this army. 

Terry's division, of this corps, with the artillery under Jackson, 
checked and finally drove back the enemy, and then the work of 
securing the flank was pushed rapidly along. 

About 400 yards east of the New Market road a strong redoubt fifty 
yards square was built, and formed a salient from which the whole 
country within 600 yards was commanded, and from its right flank 
an infantry parapet of strong proflle, well protected from assault by 
abatis, ran toward the New Market road, where it rested, about the 
vicinity of the Four-Mile Church. From this point to near the mouth 
of Four-Mile Creek strong isolated redoubts were built and manned 
with troops and artillery, so placed as to mutually support each other. 
Along New Market Heights the most salient points were taken and 
occupied by strong closed works, and in their front for 1,000 and 1,600 
yards the woods were *' slashed," thus making a continuous abatis in 
their front to the limit of the range of their artillery. Works were also 
placed to flank the valleys and sides of these hills. 

As there was some possibility of moving the greater part of this 
army to a new fleld of operations, leaving but a small force behind, 
a line of interior works, some 3,400 yards long, was built but for such 
a contingency. The right rested on Four-Mile Creek, and the left on 
the marsh below Aiken's Landing. The details of construction were 
the same as generally belong to field defenses, the stronger batteries 
being placed so as to command the most important roads or the most 
prolMkble points from which an attack would be made, with infantry 
parapets four to six feet thick on top joining them. 

In front were ditches from eight to twelve feet wide and six feet 
deep, and in advance of these a line of good abatis. This line was 
well indicated, the batteries completed, and infantry parapet two- 
thirds finished, the remaining work to be done after the troops occu- 
pied the line. Often the greatest difficulty has been in getting an 
army to take up a proper and exact line of defense at first, each regi- 
ment, company, and man digging where they find their spades, with- 
out reference to the fitness of things, indicating the necessity of more 
engineer officers. 



190 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. 

As detached works to tliis line, it was intended to hold those on 
New Market Heights and Camp Holly, which would have given us the 
command of New Market, Kingsland, and Darbytown roads. The 
necessity for this line never occurring, it was never occupied by 
troops. 

After the occupation of Fort Harrison and the rebel captured lines, 
the enemy heg&n the construction of a new line of defense joining 
their water batteries on the river at Chaffin's farm with Fort Gilmer, 
and running thence easterly to join on to that portion of the captured 
line which we could not occupy at the Charles City road, and so on 
to New Bridge on the Chickahominy. 

The line that our forces occupie<l was made as strong as possible, 
and possessed the advantage of having but a short part exposed to an 
attack of the enemy, which x>art was strongly manned and guarded. 

On the 27th a movement was made on the Darb3rtown and Williams- 
burg roads with no other result than to keep the enemy from send- 
ing re-enforcements to the right of their army at Petersburg, which 
was then being attacked by the Army of the Potomac. During this 
movement General Weitzel's troops fought on the same ground in 
advance of Seven Pines on which the Army of the Potomac fought 
in 1862. 

November. — Details of both engineers and infantry were constantly 
employed during this month in repairing the works of defense and 
perfecting and completing those alluded to. During this season the 
roads used by the supply trains from the wharves and bridges became 
much cut up, and corduroying was commenced. Wharves for the 
quartermaster, ordnance, commissary, and medical departments were 
built at suitable places on the river. Frequent rumors arriving at 
Fort Harrison that the enemy were mining the work, in order to allay 
the fears of the garrison well holes were dug on the glacis to serve for 
listening galleries. As the nearest approach of the rebel works was 
800 yards, and a valley twenty feet deep had to be crossed before 
reaching the work, but little attention was paid to these rumors. 

While attention was paid to the defensive operations we also found 
time to collect, repair, and put in working order three saw-mills, 
which were located in a splendid forest in the Bermuda woods. By 
these mills from 7,000 to 10,000 feet of lumber were sawed per day, 
the greater portion of which was used in the construction of a perma- 
nent hospital at Point of Rocks. Sufficient was obtained, however, 
to stock the engineer depot and build platforms and magazines in all 
the batteries, wharves, and bridges on the river. 

Below is a report of the engineer force of the army, and how employed, 
which may be taken as a fair standard of each day's detail during the 
period of quiet: 

Two officers, 80 men, building redoubts and corduroying roads; 2 
officers, 66 men, repairing Tenth Army Corps front; 2 officers, 90 men, 
repairing Eighteenth Army Corps front; 1 officer, 30 men, bomb- 
proof to dredge Dutch Gap and Fort Brady; 1 officer, 50 men, cordu- 
roying roads; 2 officers, 30 men, engineer depots at Bermuda and 
Fortress Monroe; 2 officers, 143 men, various small details, Ac, — 
12 officers, 489 men. First New York Volunteer Engineers — four 
officers, 105 men, on duty at saw-mills, building wharf, pontoon 
bridges, repairing wagons, Ac, 

December. — This month's labor was a continuation of the last, and 
the principal roads of supply wera ready for winter use quite early in 
the mouth. Whatever damages had been done to the defenses were 



UNION AUTHORITIES. 191 

repaired. Timber for a x)ermanent pile bridge was prepared in the 
woods, which bridge was to be built in January. A detachment of 
enmneer trooi)8 accompanied the expeditionary force to Fort Fisher. 

January. — As the enemy frequently opened a heavy mortar fire 
from in front of his works opposite Fort Harrison, and as the artil- 
lerjTnen were unable to stand to their guns during its continuance, 
it was deemed advisable to make protection to the guns on the front 
of Fort Harrison. The mortars used by the enemy were Coehorns, 
placed outside of their works and behind the line of picket reserves, 
protected in their front by a strong line of abatis. It was designed 
to bombproof the whole front of the work and put in casemates 
enough, constructed somewhat on the IIoxo plan, for the guns on the 
front. There was a banquette for infantry on top, reached by broad, 
wide stairs in rear, which gave the infantry good cover and enabled 
them to see perfectly every point in advance. The ditch was deep- 
ened and widened and a fraise placed in the scarp to prevent scal- 
ing. But four of these casemates were constructed, and two bomb- 
proofs, a sketch of which is shown on the opposite page. 

There were also three strong lines of abatis and wire entanglement 
placed in front of the ditch, making the whole work quite formidable 
and easy to hold. 

In order to save sand-bags, which at this time became very expen- 
sive, Lieutenant King, Engineer Corps, designed some loop-holes for 
riflemen and for use in the picket-lines, which proved admirably well 
adapted for their purpose, and being prepared at slight cost at the 
saw-mills, were used on all the works and rifle-pits. They were con- 
structed of boards, and of the form shown in the diagram. They 
presented a smaller target for the enemy's sharpshooters and at the 
same time gave a large field of fire. They were not easily discernible 
at any distance and could easily be removed and replaced. 

Note. — ^The rebel device for the same purpose consisted in plac- 
ing logs of various lengths, ten to fourteen inches in diameter, hewn 
on two sides, with notches cut in the lower side once in about six feet 
along the interior crest of the parapt, and banking these logs in 
front with earth. The notches which formed the loop-holes were 
tapering toward the outside, similar to our own, and where there was 
much sharpshooting the orifice was still further reduced by a plate of 
thin boiler iron eight or ten inches square, with a hole in the center 
but little larger than the barrel of a musket. These plates were 
spiked to the front side of the logs (covering the notches), and in 
some cases were found with fifteen to twenty bullet marks ujwn them, 
many of which were so near the edge of the opening that the bullets 
probably went through, and it is quite likely that all the bullets that 
struck the plate would have struck the man in the rear of it had ordi- 
nary sand-bag loop-holes been used. 

The engineer may at times find this expedient worthy his attention, 
observing that the logs near the crest of the parapet are not suitable 
where artillery can be used against them. 

The permanent pile bridge was finished after a little more than two 
weeks' labor, being 1,368 feet long. It became necessary as a substi- 
tute for the pontoon bridge owing to the great freshets in the river, 
the floating ice, and the driftwood that came down the river at this 
time. It was a pile bridge, each pier consisting of three piles driven 
firmly into the bed of the river and connected by a cap piece, and the 
piers joined by strong pieces to form bays each fifteen feet wide. An 
inclined log was attached to each pier to ward off drift and ice. This 



192 



CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. 




UNION AUTHORITIES. 



193 



was securely attached to a pile driven a short distance above and 
in the prolongation of the pier, which pile was nearly sawed off. 
When driven by the pile-drivers suflSciently it was broken off, and 
the end of the inclined pile thus anchored to the bottom; the other 
was spiked to the pier, as shown in the sketch below. 

The river deepens to 16 feet about 1,000 feet from the north shore, 
and then to 30 feet for a distance of nearly 180 feet, and then decreases 
rapidly to the shore-line. At the channel a draw of pontoon-boats 
was made 180 feet wide. The lumber which was used in the construc- 
tion of this bridge was obtained from the engineer depot saw-mills. 

February. — ^There were additional river batteries on the south side 
of the James, constructed and armed with 100-pounder guns, as an 
additional protection against another rebel raid of iron-clads. During 
this month and early in March the engineer force of the army 
decreased rapidly, owing to the expiration of their term of service. 

March. — There were at this time less than 300 effective men for 
duty, and but a small number of these were engineer soldiers proper. 
Rex)air8 of the batteries were constantly going on. To obviate the 
effects of winter weather, platforms were relaid, magazines drained, 




and their cover renewed and thickened, and generally the lines of the 
army put in good defensible condition. 

The mules belonging to the pontoon train were worked continu- 
ously at the saw-mills during the winter, and only relieved when 
directed by Major-General Barnard, the engineer of the combined 
armies operating against Richmond, to be used in preparing four 
pontoon trains for active service and marching. New mules were 
obtained, and every effort made to break them to harness in time. 
The whole artisan force was put at work to repair and strengthen the 
wagons and boats. Finally orders were issued to take a train of but 
fifteen canvas boats, which was ready for the march on the day speci- 
fied. The engineer force was divided; one part under Bvt. Maj. 
W. R. King, U. S. Engineers, remained with General Weitzel's forces, 
and entered the city of Richmond with his command. They began 
and continued the erection of a defensive line until the news of 
Lee's surrender reached the city. They also built a i)ontoon bridge 
joining Richmond and Manchester 2,400 feet long, upon which after- 
ward the Armies of the James, the Potomac, Sherman's army, and 
Sheridan's cavalry crossed. The engineer force with the moving 
column consisted of six companies of engineers and one of pontoniers. 

13 R R^-8KRIBS m, VOL V 



194 C0EEE8P0NDENCE, ETC. 

A tool train of ten wagons moved with the pontoon trains; the latter 
consisted of thirty-two wagons, carrying forage, spare chess, and 380 
feet of bridge material. The weight, drawn by eight mules, was ascer- 
tained by weighing a pontoon wagon with its material two weeks after 
the campaign closed, and was found to be as follows: 

Pounds. 

Two boats of canvas and box 805 

Transoms 470 

Claw balks 1,440 

Saddle balks 244 

Boat sides 224 

Anchor lines 175 

Anchors 810 

Wagon load 8,168 

Wagon 1,278 

Weightdrawn 4,446 

During the march there were rains, which wpuld increase the weight. 
On the 29th of March the moving column of the Army of the James, 
consisting of Turner's division of West Virginia troops, of the Twenty- 
fourth Army Corps, and Foster's (First) division of the same corps, 
commanded by Major-General Gibbon, and Birney's division of the 
Twenty-fifth Ai'my Corps, all commanded by Major-General Ord, 
occupied the left of the Army of the Potomac, intrenched lines resting 
on Hatcher's Run. 

On the 30th an advance was made across the run by Turner's and 
Foster's divisions, rebel picket-line captured, and a position secured 
beyond Armstrong's house, with 800 yards of the rebel line of works. 
Turner's division joined the Second Army Corps by a bridge built 
over the run. On Turner's right Foster and Birney made the con- 
nection with the Sixth Army Corps, still in position behind their 
intrenched lines. Attempts were made during the night to build 
intrenchments and cover for a battery, but< the ground would not 
stand, being saturated with water from recent heavy rains, and so 
spongy that it would not bear the weight of a horse. 

April. — On the morning of the 2d, the successful assault being made 
and rapidly followed up by an attack on Fort Gregg, which was taken 
after some desperate fighting, the troops occupied a x)osition entirely 
surrounding Petersburg. During the night everything was got in 
readiness for a rapid march in the morning. Starting at 5 a. m., and 
taking the Cox road, our army made a rapid march toward Burke- 
ville; a part of the engineer force moved ahead to repair roads and 
bridges; the pontoon trains followed headquarters, to be in readiness 
in case of necessity. Burke ville was reached on the night of the 5th 
and occupied during the next day. A small force being sent out to 
bum the High Bridge at Farmville was met by the rebel advance and 
captured, after desi)erate fighting. The troops moved in that direc- 
tion on the 6th, and engaged a portion of the advance of the enemy, 
while the cavalry headed them off on the Prince Edward Court-House 
road. On the afternoon of the 7th the troops entered Farmville, the 
enemy burning the bridges at this place and retreating across the 
river. The pontoon train of our army having been well kept up to 
the front, notwithstanding its overloaded condition, was fortunately 
able to be used to pass over the artillery and trains of the Sixth and 
Second Army Corps and enable them to follow in rapid pursuit of 
the enemy that night. The pontoons were relieved by those of the 
Army of tlie Potomac before daybreak, and once more in jiosition for 
a new march. 



UNION AUTHORITIES. 



195 



At daylight on the 8th the Twenty-fourth Army Corps moved from 
Farmville, taking the road running nearly with the South Side Rail- 
road, and made a forced march 
of nearly thirty-three miles be- 
fore mid[night, resting for a few 
hours on the railroad where 
Sheridan had captured several 
cars loaded with bacon and 
com. At 3.30 a. m. on the 9th 
the infantry moved again, and 
at 8 a. m. were in action on the 
extreme left of the army. The 
leading brigade of Foster's di- 
vision, of the Twenty-fourth 
Army CoriM, went into action on 
the double-quick, and delivered 
the volley which staggered and 
drove back the advance of the 
enemy, who had at that moment 
gained some temporary advan- 
tage over the cavah^. The 
action lasted until 10 a. m., 
when a truce was granted pre- 
liminary to the surrender. 

May. — During this month a 
bridge was built at Fredericks- 
burg. Surveys were made, by 
direction of Major-General Bar- 
nard, of the detached works 
surrounding the city, and orders 
were afterward received to con- 
tinue the survey of the in- 
trenched lines and country 
adjacent to Richmond. 

June, — Brevet Major King 
was intrusted with the charge 
of rebuilding a bridge, called 
Mayo's Bridge, connecting Rich- 
mond and Manchester. The 
following is an extract from his 
report on the completion of the 
bridge. The plan adopted for 
the bridge is represented by the 
accomi>anying drawing, page 
45 [195]. 

DBSCBIPTION. 

c / i, main chords made of 
four pieces, four by twelve 
inches, breaking joints, and 
forming continuous beams the 
entire length of the bridge. 

j t, corbels, fourteen by six- 
teen inches, resting on wall plates w w, and supporting main chords. 

ab g hy Ac, straining beams, ten by twelve inches, oak, supported 
by posts and struts. 




196 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. 

bcgf, ^c, main suspending rods in pairs, secured at 6 and g by 
wrought-iron plates, and at c and / by cast-iron connecting pbktes 
bolted to the chord. 

c d and e/, lower suspending rods, secured at c and /to cast-iron 
connecting plates, and at d and e to horizontal wrought-iron bars; 
these bars being connected by three small rods (2 6, d fe, and e /c, diag- 
onal iron braces, to prevent vertical undulations. 

k k, floor girders, ten by fourteen inches, supporting 4-inch by 
12-inch ioists and d-inch plank. 

dkeJcf oak supports, six by ten inches, resting in cast-iron shoes, 
which are supported by wrought-iron bars d and 6. 

Lateral braces (not shown in drawing) connect the floor girders to 
prevent horizontal swaying, and diagonal braces steady tibie jKWts d k 
and e k. 

DIBCENSIONS. 

Entire length, 1,396 feet; entire width, including sidewalks, 31 feet; 
width of carriage-way in clear, 19^ feet; number of bays, 18; width of 
bays, 69 to 78 feet; height of piers at low water, 20 feet. 

The strains on the different rods were computed as follows: Allow- 
ing for a load of 40 pounds per square foot of roadway, 40 jiounds per 
cubic foot of timber, and 60,000 pounds as the breaking weight of iron 
I>er square inch, then the greatest strain on the upper suspension rods 
win be nearly 32,600 pounds. 

PMmds. 

Breaking weight of same 90,000 

Lower inclined saspension rods, greatest strain 16,000 

Breaking weight 46,500 

Lower horizontal suspension rods, greatest strain 10,200 

Breaking weight 26,000 

The entire amount of wrought-iron used, including bolts, plates, &c., was. 44, 068 
Cast-iron 13,586 



Narrative from General Tower* s reports of February 1 
1866, to General Delafield, Chief Engines 



and March Sly 
tneer. 



Nashville was flrst occupied by our army on the 15th and 16th of 
December, 1864 [sic]. The officers of the Corps of Engineers com- 
menced to fortify it at that time, and as its importance increased from 
time to time, by making it the depot for the armies of the West, the 
labors of the engineers continued, and were not relaxed to the date of 
the last effort of the rebels to capture it, and thus endeavor to frustrate 
Sherman's march through Georgia and the Oarolinas to Virginia. To 
hold it and check the advance of Hood through Kentucky to the Ohio 
called forth all the zeal and talent of the engineers. General Tower 
had been sent thither in September, 1864, and labored to perfect the 
incomplete defenses. On the advance of the rebel Greneral Hood, and 
while the army was falling back from Franklin, the necessity for 
strengthening and completing these defenses became more uigent. 
He then wrote to the assistant adjutant-general of Major-General 
Thomas, suggesting that the forces of the Quartermaster's Department 
might throw an intrenched line over the high hills in advance of the 
Lorenz house, should it be thought expedient. (See plan No. 4.*) 

* Plate LXXn, Map d, of the Atlas. It ai>pear8 that the map published in the 
Atlas omits the numoers desiflniating the hills herein mentionea. For the map 
containing these numbers, see Executive Document No. 1, House of Bepresenta- 
tives, TUxty-ninth Ck>ngre6s, first session, Vol. II. 



UNION AUTHOBITIES. 197 

At 12 m. Greneral Thomas visited Fort Morton and informed him that 
about 5,000 men wonld report at 1 o'clock. To his question, *' Shall 
they intrench the Lorenz Hills?" he replied, "No; let them construct 
your interior line connecting with the forts. The army will hold the 
hills and intrench them." 

He therefore gave Captain Jenney, who was assisting him, direc- 
tions to run the line of infantry intrenchments from Fort Morton 
around the Taylor house to hill 210. Captain Jenney was assisted by 
Major Powell, of the Tennessee Army reserve artillery. Major Dick- 
son, inspector of artillery of the Army of the Tennessee, superintended 
assiduously the construction of the large and important battery on 
hill 210. Captain Barlow, of the Corps of Engineers, took charge of 
the line from the Cumberland River to the Chattanooga railroad, 
south side of the city. 

A iwrtion of the line from hill 210 to Hyde's Ferry was laid out by 
Captain Barlow and himself, the rest by Major Willett. During the fif- 
teen days preceding the battles before Nashville more than seven miles 
of infantry parapet and rifle-pit intrenchments were thus constructed 
by the quartermaster's and railroad forces. This gave a continuous 
line (see plan No. 4*) in advance of all the hospitals, store-houses, 
and other structures, except the scattered houses of the suburbs in 
front of College Hill, and held the elevated positions which looked 
upon the buildings within range. It is the line indicated in his report 
of October, 1864. It is just as long a line as that occupied by the 
army over the hills, but the shortest that would effectually secure the 
hospitals and other important structures. The line over the hills was 
the best army line, but deriving no support from Forts Morton, Hous- 
ton, Gillem, and Hyde's Ferry, could not be held by the usual forces 
occupying Nashville. 

It would have required a large number of redoubts of expensive 
construction, owing to the rocky nature of the soil, to have fortified 
the line of hills, but such line would hold an enemy well away from 
the city, covering it effectually. It was his opinion that completing 
the works already described, and strengthening the principal batteries 
at intermediate points, would make Nashville secure with its usual 
garrison, aided by the quartermaster's organized forces. Hill 210 
must be strengthened, as it is a key x>osition, and the Taylor house 
knoll should be supported by a keep. Small block-houses in batteries, 
like the construction for Battery Donaldson, are a good arrangement 
when well covered by the parapets. Unfortunately, wood construc- 
tions are the most difficult of accomplishment. Embrasures, maga- 
zines, and block-house bombproofs cause the great delay in making 
forts and batteries. A great deal, however, has been accomplished 
during the past three months in spite of extremely unfavorable 
weather, mud, and muddy roads. It has rained more than half the 
time. 

When General Sherman apx>ointed him inspector-general of forti- 
fications for his military division he requested him to look well to the 
defenses of Nashville. He also called his attention to Murfrees- 
boTough and Columbia, the line of defense for the army falling back. 
Murfreesborough was known to be well defended. Columbia was the 
position on Duck River which would have been held by our army had 

opiate LXXU, Map 3, of the Atlas. It appears that the map published in the 
Atlas omits the ntmiDers designating the mUs herein mentionea. For the map 
contaiiung these numbers, see Executive Document No. 1, House of Repreeenta- 
tives. Thirty-ninth Congress, first session, Vol. U. 



198 CORBESPONDENCE, ETC. 

the corps from Missouri arrived a week sooner. As things occurred, 
Nashville was the threatened point, and he gave his attention to its 
defenses, using all his personal influence to get aid from every source 
possible. The plans submitted vrill show works devised by him for 
the defense of this depot and alticrations in original works. He had 
to thank the railroad department for much assistance rendered, and 
especially the quartermaster's department for aid in laborers and 
material. These laborers were mostly organized as brigades, and 
turned out as such and guarded two miles of the interior line during 
the battles of the 15th and 16th of December, 1864, and in case of an 
attack on the city would doubtless be an efficient assistance to this 
garrison. 

Captain Barlow understands this x)osition well, and would doubt- 
less do everything in his power to forward its defenses. Waiting for 
plans has delayed this synopsis of engineer operations at Nashville. 

He was getting up a plan of the magnificent battles of December 
15 and 16, gained by the U. S. army commanded by Major-General 
Thomas over the rebel forces under General Hood. (See phin No. 4. *) 

Having accompanied the commanding general during these fights, 
it was his special request that he should direct the survey and draw- 
ing of the plan illustrating them. 

Captain Barlow, U. S. Engineers, in immediate charge of the 
defenses of Nashville since the middle of December, had much 
improved his department and heartily responded to his efforts to 
push forward the defensive line. Captain Jenney, aide-de-camp on 
General Sherman's staff, in charge of topographical office there, had 
voluntarily assisted and had done excellent service superintending at 
Forts Houston and Gillem, and in the construction of infantry line 
of intrenchments. 

He has sent the map (see plan No. 4*) of the battles of Nashville, 
which shows the dispositions of troops before and during the battles, 
and which, with the exception of sections, seems clear and complete. 
By a little attention it will be perceived how admirably the battle was 
planned. Its execution was in accordance with the plan. 

X was the turning point on which the army wheeled as on a pivot. 
From that point to the river on the left the lines were held by new 
troops under General Steedman, while the three infantry corps, com- 
manded by Generals Wood, Smith, and Schofield, and the Cavalry 
Corps under General Wilson, were hurled upon the enemy's center 
and left. Our army, thus in position, formed nearly a straight line, 
of which the left, far refused (made up of new troops), held lines sup- 
I)orted by works and covered by a brilliant dash of General Steedman 
with a small force in advance toward the enemy's right. The right 
was the old fighting ai*my, which, though requiring much time to 
swing into position (about 40,000 strong), necessarily broke the 
enemy's left and drove him from his main line. 

The second day the rebel general had concentrated his forces; but 
the moral effect of his first day's fight, his losses, especially in artillery, 
together with our superiority of cavalry, which dismounted and 
attacked his left rear, all contributed to his defeat; and the left of 
his line was broken about 4 o'clock by a dash of General Smith's corps. 
The battle is worthy of study. 

• Plate TiXXU, Map 2, of the Atlas. 



UNION AUTHOBITIES. 199 

Narrative from the report of Bvt. Brig. Gen, O. M, Poe to the Chief 
Engineer, dated October 8, 1865 ^ 

Narrative collated from the report of lAeutenant and Brevet Captain 
SticJeney, Corps of Engineers, June 3, 1866, to General Richard 
Delafietd, Chief migineer U. 8. Army, {See plans Nos. S and ii. f) 

While remaining in Goldsborough, from March 24 to April 10, the 
pontoon train was put in complete repair as far as material at hand 
woald admit. Thirty new canvas boat covers were received and all 
but ten of the old covers sent to New Berne. 

April 10 the army moved out from Goldsborough toward Raleigh, 
arriving at the latter place on the 14th. The next day the Fifteenth 
Army Corps proceeded to Morrisville and the Seventeenth Army Corps 
to Jones' Station, at which places they were halted on account of the 
negotiations for the surrender of the enemy's army. None of the 
bridges over the streams between Goldsborough and Raleigh were 
destroyed, but the planks were in most cases thrown off and were 
soon replaced, causing no delay of any consequence. The roads were 
in very bad condition between Goldsborough and Pineville, the Fif- 
teenth Army Corps being obliged to build 214 feet of wagon bridges 
over sloughs, 175 feet of foot bridges, and 13,196 yards of corduroy. 
The-Seventeenth Army Corps made 426 feet of bridges and 16,918 yards 
of corduroy. The army remained in the vicinity of Raleigh till April 
29, when, the rebel army having surrendered, it started on its home- 
ward march toward Petersburg, where it arrived May 6. The roads 
were in excellent condition and bridges standing over all the rivers 
except the Neuse and Roanoke. The army arrived at Robinson's 
Ferry, on the Roanoke, May 3, the pontoon train being in advance. 
This river is 740 feet wide at the point at which the army crossed, 
and the depth of water from five to ten feet. The pontoon train 
contained only 580 feet of bridging, but they found four large wooden 
boats on the river, which were rigged up with centerpieces, made 
four trestles, and the bridge was ready for crossing by 8 a. m. on the 
4th, after a hard night's work. After remaining two days at Peters- 
burs the army moved to Manchester. 

The major-general commanding informed Captain Stickney that 
from Manchester up they would find bridges over all streams, as they 
were to be left for them by the Army of the Potomac, which preceded 
them; consequently he did not think it necessary to procure more 
chesses. 

On the 12th of May the Seventeenth Army Corps started for Alex- 
andria, the Fifteenth Army Corps on the following day, and arrived 
there on the 19th. The roads were generally good all the way from 
Raleigh to Alexandria, and the army moved with surprising celerity. 
He was disappointed, however, about the bridges, there being none 
over the Pamunkey or Occoquan Rivers. The former was very much 
swollen, the water overfiowing the southern bank to the depth of 
about two feet and a half when they first arrived, the morning of 
May 13, and continued to rise during the day and following night. 

The pontoon bridge was laid and some trains passed over that 
afternoon, but before the next morning the water ros^ so high that 
it became necessary to build a kind of trestle bridge about thirty 

♦Here omitted in view of the full report published in Series I, Vol. XXXVIII, 
Part I, p. 127 ; Vol. XLIV, p. 68, and Vol. XLVII, Part I, p. 109. 
tPIate LXXVI, Map 2, and Plate C, Map 1, of the Atlas. 



200 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. 

yards in length to approach the pontoons. This was done by the First 
Michigan Engineers and Seventeenth Army Corps pioneers. 

Lieut. Col. William IVeeddale, with his regiment, the First Mis* 
souri Engineers, had charge of the pontoon train. 

The pontoon train has most of the time been divided into two 
sections — one section moving with each army corps and each section 
being accompanied by a portion of the First Missouri Engineers. 

The First Michigan Engineers moved with the Seventeenth Army 
Corps, but were under Captain Stickney's orders only on the occasion 
at the Roanoke River. 

Following is a statement of places where pontoon bridges were laid: 

April 14, over Neuse River, at Battle's Bridge, 160 feet. 

April 20, over Neuse River, at Powell's Bridge, 200 feet. 

May 3, over Roanoke River, at Robinson's Ferry, 740 feet. 

May 13, over Pamunkey River, at Littlepage's Bridge, 200 feet. 

May 18, over Occoquan River, at Occoquan, 280 feet. 



Narrative collated from the report of LietUenant- Colonel and Brevet 
Brigadier- General ComstocfCy of the Corps of Engineers, of the 
27th of January, 1865, addressed to General Terry, and copy to 
General DeLafieid, Chief Engineer.* 



War Department, Payila^ster-General's Office, 

Washington, October 31, 1865, 
Hon. Edwin M. Stanton, 

Secretary of War: 
Sir: I have the honor to submit a report of the official transactions 
of the Pay Department of the Army for the fiscal year ending June 
30, 1865. 

The tabular statements herewith presented exhibit the details from 
which the following statement in gross is madetf 

Balance in hands of paymasters and tinisstied requisitions in Treas- 
ury at beginning of fiscal year (Jnlv 1,1864) $86,089,808.87 

Received from the Treasury during the fiscal year (including un- 
issued requisitions in Treasury on June SO, 1865) 837,200,000.00 

Received by paymasters from other sources, exclusive of sums 
transferred among themselves 6,815,187.50 

Total to be accounted for 480,054,946.87 

Accounted for as follows : 

Disbursements to the BeRular Army 7, 889, 235. 47 

Disbursements to the Military Academy 153,099.11 

Disbursements to the volunteers 300,738,635.95 

Total disbursement 308, 730, 960 . 53 

Amount of unissued requisitions in the Treasury on June 80, 1865. 65, 900, 000. 00 
Balance actually in bands of paymasters on June 30, 1866 55,428,985.84 

430.054,946.87 

This large amount in the hands of paymasters at the end of the 
fiscal year was an unavoidable necessity from the fact that at that 

♦ Here omitted in view of the publication of full report in Series I, Vol. XLYI« 
Part I, p. 406. 
t Tabular statements omitted in view of the general summary following. 



UNION AUTHORITIES. 201 

precise period of time the department was everywhere throughout 
the country under the greatest pressure of payments to mustered-out 
troops, and money in large sums had to be kept thus distributed. 

From the above it will be seen that the sum actually disbursed dur- 
ing the fiscal year and in process of disbursement at the end thereof 
was $430,054,946.37. 

Since the beginning of the current fiscal year, besides the above 
sums in the hands of paymasters and the unissued requisitions 
stated, $94,000,000 have been disbursed and distributed for disburse- 
ment, making a total expenditure of $524,054,946.37 during the last 
fiscal year and the present one to this date. 

Of this large sum more than one-half ($270,000,000) has been paid 
to disbanded volunteer troops mustered out of service. 

From the early days of June to the present time this department 
has made final payment to more than 800,000 officers and men. The 
number paid cannot be definitely stated for the want of time for full 
official returns to be received from the many various and distant 
points of payment throughout the country, especially as these pay- 
ments are still continuing. £nough, however, is known with cer- 
tainty to establish the fact that the figures stated are not in excess. 

This is an extraordinary exhibit of work performed chiefiy within 
the three months of June, July, and August — $270,000,000 of money 
paid to 800,000 individual men. When the manner of these payments is 
observed, with a knowledge of the particularity required in each case — 
the accounts varying in amounts, each to be separately computed in 
its several items of pay, clothing, bounty, ^c, with such stoppages 
as may be chargeable deducted; the final amount stated and the sig- 
nature of each officer and man to be appended in duplicate to the 
receipt rolls — a just appreciation may be formed of the stupendous 
labor involved. No similar work of like magnitude, regarding its 
immensity both as to men and money and the small limit of time in 
which it has been performed, has, it is believed, any parallel in the 
history of armies. 

The troops for dischaige were, under the orders from the Adjutant- 
General's Office, transported to their respective State rendezvous as 
rapidly as the proper officers of the various organizations could dis- 
patch the duty of mustering out. 

This department engaged to prepare with funds officers at all the 
sixty different places of designated rendezvous throughout the States, 
and to make prompt payment in the shortest practicable time on the 
arrival of each organization, so as substantially to avert delays, 
with all their evil consequences, at the places of rendezvous. How far 
this pledge on our part has been redeemed the country can answer. 
The facts of record in the War Department show no delays of moment 
occurring in any quarter; none, at least, chargeable to this depart- 
ment. The work is mainly accomplished, satisfactorily accomplished, 
beyond the most sanguine anticipations of those who could under- 
stand and properly measure the vastness of the undertaking. 

For this result the country is indebted largely to the zeal, intelli- 
gence, and sleepless industry of a corps of experienced paymasters 
who signalized themselves in this the closing act of their military staff 
service by a faithfulness and devotion which reflects the highest honor 
upon them as a body and as individual officers. To them, under the 
skillful management of their supervising district chiefs, this depart- 
ment owes its success; and I take occasion, as the head of the 
department, in this public official communication to render to them 



202 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. 

the homage of my grateful acknowledgments. The credit is theirs, 
for without their experience and cordial co-operative efforts not all 
the powers of the Government combined could have wrought so 
favorable a solution of a difficult problem. 

It becomes my duty also to notice here, in most favorable terms, the 
valued services of the officers and clerks connected immediately with 
this office. They appreciated the emergency and bent themselves 
to the difficult work which, for a time, pressed upon the office with 
almost overwhelming weight. With payments simultaneously pro- 
gressing at sixty different points, widely separated, with the necessity 
of keeping each one supplied with funds from day to day, and a neces- 
sity also that each should have no more than required for immediate 
disbursement — drawing from the Treasury at the rate of •20,000,000 
per week and compelled to make close estimate and careful watch of 
its daily distribution, so that the demand at each given point should 
be surely supplied and yet no more than supplied ; telegrams and let- 
ters continually pouring in noting the movement and destination of 
troops, and repeating these notices to the proper points of rendezvous; 
applications and appeals constantly arriving requiring immediate 
answers; new questions arising and refeired to this office for 
instructions, <fec. — kept our thoughts, our pens, our press, and the 
telegraph in constant requisition by day and by night. Mid all this 
I am happy to bear testimony that every one labored with cheerful 
alacrity — in some instances, indeed, during the heated season, even 
beyond their strength. It may be said of these, as I have said of tlie 
paymasters in the field — but for their willing efforts, rendered with 
self-denying devotion, the work could not have been a success. 

The unstinted facilities extended, sir, by your authority and orders, 
in the free use of the military telegraph, the printing press, and all 
other agencies that could be profitably applied to the end, together 
with the liberal confidence which you were pleased to repose in this 
office, leaving to it an almost unrestricted discretion to manage, with- 
out hindrance, its own details; your concurrence in and support 
of its acts and orders — ^these reveal the vital secret of a result so 
favorable. 

I cannot close this branch of my subject without a grateful expres- 
sion of indebtedness to the officers of the Treasury Dex>artment for 
the courteous and zealous attention with which, during the trying 
exigency, they always entertained the imx>ortunate demands of this 
office. What often seemed as hopeless impossibilities obstructing the 
financial path were, by their fervent efforts, readily dispelled, and 
thus all our requisitions were met with most satisfactory promptness. 

At the date of my last annual report, besides the small number of 
officers constituting the Pay Department of the Regular Army (and 
which is without casualty or change since), there were in the service 
409 additional paymasters, contingent appointments under the law of 
July, 1838. Afterward, up to March 3, 38 others were appointed 
and confirmed, making a total of 447, accounted as follows: Resigned, 
89; commission declined, 1; dismis8ed,4; apx>ointments canceled, 21; 
dropped, 2; died of disease, 5; lost at sea, 1; killed by guerrillas, 2; 
died while prisoner of war, 1 ; mustered out. Ill; total casualties, 237; 
remaining in service, 210. 

This reduction may still continue, following with even pace, as their 
services can be spared and their accounts be rendered, the progress 
of the reduction of the Arm}'. 



UNION AUTH0BITIB8. 203 

The sadden difibandment of our volunteer hosts, besides their final 
payment on the ordinary forms of muster-out rolls and other discharge 
papers, has devolved upon this department an inordinate accumula* 
tion of ''referred claims" transmitted for adjustment and payment. 
These have arisen from various causes, but chiefly from the inability 
of the ofBcers charged with the execution of the muster-out papers to 
reach a complete history as to pay, clothing, bounty, Ac^ of large 
numbers of enlisted men, so as to enable a final settlement at the time 
of discharge. To all such certificates of discharge are furnished, 
upon which are indorsed the fact of non-payment, and the holders 
are directed to forward the same, as the basis of their claim, to the 
Paymaster-General for adjustment. 

Such magnitude has this demand attained that it has been found 
necessary to organize a special division of paymasters as an attach- 
ment of this Bureau to take exclusive cognizance of this class of 
claims. 

This ''division of referred claims" is now composed of a chief 
supervising paymaster of much intelligence, judgment, and experi- 
ence, with twelve other paymasters; also competent officers of 
experience and a corps of sixty-four active clerks. The x>eculiar 
labors of this division could not be near so well performed under any 
other organization, having, as this does, enlightened paymasters to 
supervise every branch of the work, each being responsible for his own. 

Every claim sent to this division requires for its elucidation a care- 
ful and laborious search through all the previous rolls on file in 
this and the Second Auditor's OfSce, besides constant reference to the 
Adjutant-Generars Office, to trace out through the past records all 
the facts touching the case, the charges, stoppages, forfeitures, cfec, 
that it may be stated with accuracy the balance due the claimant. 
This done, vouchers in form covering that balance are filled out and 
transmitted to the claimant for his signature, which returned to the 
paymaster, the latter remits a check for the amount. From this it 
will be seen how tedious is the work of this division, what careful 
industry it demands, and how inevitable are the delays complained of 
by impatient claimants. 

The clerical force of this Bureau is without material change since 
the date of my last annual rei)ort. 

For months past, in anticipation of an early permanent reduction 
of that force, I have refrained from recommending new appointments 
to fill such vacancies as have occurred by resignation and other 
casualties. 

This course, I apprehend, may continue without injury or material 
inconvenience to the public service. Such, however, is the sudden 
accumulation of the business of the Bureau, by reason of the present 
influx for examination of rolls and other classes of vouchers, result- 
ing from the recent and continued large payments to disbanded troops 
already adverted to, that but a very slight reduction in the number 
of clerks employed will be practicable for some months to come. 

I need hardly urge the unqualified conviction that the compensa- 
tion allowed by the Government to this indispensable class of public 
agents is quite inadequate in view of the present exorbitant cost of 
the necessaries of life. The clerks of this Bureau as a body are 
highly meritorious and deserving public servants. None, I am sure, 
better than they have by faithful industry earned just title to favor- 
able consideration. It becomes my duty, therefore, respectfully, but 



204 C0RKE8P0NDEKCE, ETC. 

urgently, to recommend a reasonable increase of the rates of compen- 
sation now by law fixed for the clerks employed in this Bureau. 
Especially is this demanded by every consideration of the public 
interest, of enlightened public economy, for the clerks of the higher 
grades and for the chief clerk. I feel sure I have only to present 
this subject to your attention to insure your influence in the further- 
ance of a consummation so proper. 

In another paper communicated to you, dated the 11th instant, I 
have had the honor to submit for your consideration a plan for the 
better organization and a permanent increase of the Pay Department 
of the Army, to which I respectfully invite your attention in connec- 
tion with this report. 

The entire of the Regular Army and the volunteer forces of every 
description retained in service, and not embraced in orders for muster 
out, have been paid, or are provided for and in process of payment, 
to the end of the last fiscal year (to 1st of July last). 

Many organizations have been paid to the later date of September 1. 

All discharged troops have been paid in full, and all being dis- 
charged or under orders for discharge are provided for, and will be 
paid as fast as they arrive at their respective places of rendezvous. 

Paymasters are held in readiness to make another payment to the 
troops who shall be continued in the service, whenever the needful 
funds for that purpose may be available. 

In conclusion, I beg to present to your attention the following 
remarkable summary statement of the results in this department 
during the past four years of war: 

The total of money disbursed by the department from July 1, 1861, 
to the present date is $1,029,239,000. 

Total defalcations in the department for same iieriod, 8np];x)sing that 
nothing is made from snreties (it is believed that more than one-half 
wiU be coUected from these sonrces) $541,000 

Total expenses for disbursements, including pay and aUowanoee to pay- 
masters and their clerks, mileajze, and traveling expenses, &c.,an 
average of 350 paymasters and 400 clerks for the term of four years 
and four months (a large average) 6, 429, 600 

Total defalcations and expenses 6,970,600 

Thus it is seen that the total of every character of expense to the 
Government arising from the disbursement of the pay to the armies 
during the period stated is less than seven-tenths of 1 per cent, of 
the sum disbursed. 

Surely this is a cost most wonderfully cheap for the execution of 
duties so important and responsible. It is much questioned if there 
is another instance on record of public disbursement so cheaply 
performed. 

Respectfully submitted. 

B. W. BRICE, 
Paymaster- Oener at U, S, Army. 



Provost-Marshal-General's Office, 

WashingtoUy D. C, November i, 1865, 
Brig. Gen. James B. Fry, 

Provost'MarsJial' General of the United States: 
General: In obedience to instructions I have the honor to submit 
the annual report of the operations of the Disbursing Branch of the 



UNION AUTHORITIES. 



205 



Provoet-Marshal-GeneraPs Bureau for the year ending November 1, 
1865: 

Upon assuming the duties of this branch in March, 1865, it was not 
deemed necessary to make any changes in the system then in oper- 
ation, which was fully described in the last annual report. No mate- 
rial change in the status of the employ^ of this Bureau had occurred 
up to the 31st day of March, 1865, from that shown in the annual 
report dated November 7, 1864, the number of i)ersons employed and 
the salaries paid them being nearly alike at both dates. Since that 
time the number of employ^ and all expenditures have been reduced 
as rapidly as circumstances and the interests of the public service 
would permit. 

The following exhibit of the employ^ of this Bureau as they stood 
on the 1st day of November, 1864, will, on comparison with the state- 
ment given on the succeeding page, show the relative status at the 
two dates: 



SUte. 


1 




} 


^ 


1 




1 
1 


1 


1 


i 

1 


i 

1 


^ 


MftiiM ..................... 


10 

31 
24 

1» 

11 
18 


14 

» 

7 

le 

4 
3 

67 
20 
70 
8 
19 
14 
85 

eo 

17 
59 
89 
52 
25 
40 
57 


25 
3 
8 
23 
10 
5 
89 
12 
80 
7 
17 
12 
26 
58 
85 
23 
48 
15 
8 
37 
22 
7 
4 
2 


17 
12 
11 
33 
6 
11 
99 
14 
93 
8 

22 

10 

25 

63 

19 

28 

41 

16 

9 

19 

22 

6 

7 

1 

1 

2 

1 

2 

6 

1 


46 

1 

13 
178 
55 

130 

8 

12 

6 

19 

163 

40 

68 

77 

16 

14 

44 

2 

3 


5 
3 

1 

3 
22 
11 
14 
1 
2 
1 
5 
15 
5 
7 
14 
6 
2 
7 
8 
2 
1 


4 
1 
1 
7 
1 
4 

25 
4 

24 
I 
5 
4 
7 

11 
8 
3 
7 
7 
8 
1 
4 








112 


NewHJunMhire 








35 


Vermont. : 










17 


Hamarhniwttn 


1 






' 


143 










25 


CojuMcUent 










39 


N«w York 


81 






5 


644 


Kew Jersey 


118 


PeDneylvania 






1 


443 


Dfllawiurft 






28 


UMXjlMDd 

Wfitt VfrginlA . 








8 


80 








47 


XentnckjT 








1 
4 

1 


168 


Ohio 


19 






888 


Michiinn 






120 


THton» .,,, 


7 






195 


niinoU 








1 
1 


237 


Iowa 




113 


Mmneeota 


( 




82 


Wieocmaiu 






148 


Mieioari 








115 


Biatnet of ColmnbiA 


1 






18 


KjOilUtM 












16 


Nebraska Territory 















Colorado Territory 


















IMkota Territorr 






1 












Nerada Terri tory 




1 












Waahiuffton Territory 




""4' 


1 
2 

1 












California 














16 


Ore|;oii 





































Total 


189 


098 


577 


600 


958 


140 


132 


115 


1 


4 


18 


8.243 





206 



COBRBSPONDENCE, ETC. 



The BtLbjoined statement will show the number and classification of 
all employes on duty in the offices of proyost-marshals and acting 
assistant provost-marshals-general at this date: 



Stole. 


1 


, 


j 


1 


H 


*» 


►» 


1 


1 




i 


^ 


ICftine 


10 

81 
M 

19 
11 
18 






6 
5 
6 
13 


1 




1 










7 


Nftir HMDMhlrft r . . 














5 


YenDont.. 


















.... 


5 












4 










18 




























5 
42 

•7 
25 
1 
7 
1 
6 
18 
11 
S4 
18 
IS 
8 
8 
8 
4 
4 






1 
11 

8 
10 

1 
1 










9 


New York 


















58 


NewJeney..... 


















10 


PvnntylTMiiA ..»- » 






1 












88 


DoIaw An 














S 


MairlAnd r.. 


















g 


Dtetxiotof GdlnmblA 












" 




" 


1 


WMtVireinlA 










2 
8 

4 
2 
6 

7 

1 
4 
2 
1 
2 










7 


Kentacky 






1 
1 






*. 






17 


MiMonii 














18 


Ohio 














M 


Indiana 


















S 


lUinoia 


















VlAhlffAn 


















9 


fowmT?!.:::::::":::::::::::::":::"::::::! 


















IS 


WiMKmatn ....^r-^^r-- .tt-t 


















10 


Minneeoto 


















5 


Kan8aa • ■■••.. .-- 










' 








5 


NAbraakaTerritorv 
















.... 




Cokinido Territory 




















.... 


.... 


Dakoto Territorv 
























Oregon Territory..... 
























WaMtnirton Territory 




















.... 




CalifonSa 






• 






3 










9 


Kerada 


































.... 


*' 




• ••• 


... 


Total 


180 






234 


4 


.... 


88 










808 



















The number of clerks, messengers, and watchmen at present 
employed in the Disbursing Branch is as follows: 





Clerka. 


ll 


j 


^ 




Offlceof- 


1 

1 


1 


(D 


J 

1 


s 


1 


MaJ. H. R. Rathbone 


1 


2 


8 
8 

4 


7 
3 



I 


8 


.... 


2 
.... 


U 


Capt R. tiodor. First and Second DlTisiona 


7 


Capt. 8. Dana, Third and Fourth Divieiona 








1 


12 










Total 


1 


2 


10 


10 


1 


8 1 ^ 


8 


87 











As rapidly as the number of employes was reduced and expenses 
curtailed it became necessary to reduce and consolidate the diYisions 
of this branch, the first consolidation going into effect on the 1st day 
of June, 1865, at which date Capt. F. H. Barroll, disbursing officer in 
charge of Third DiYision, was relicYcd, and his duties transferred to 
Capt. S. Dana, in charge of Fourth DiYision, both diYisions being 
consolidated in one. 



UNION AUTHORITIES. 207 

The continaed reduction of the business of this branch necessitated 
a still further consolidation, which took effect September 4, 1865, 
Bvt. Lieut. Col. J. McL. Hildt, disbursing officer in charge of First 
Division, being relieved on that date, and his duties transferred to 
Capt. R. Lodor, disbursing officer in charge of Second Division, both 
divisions being consolidated in one. 

The number of letters received, letters sent, and indorsements 
made during the year ending November 1, 1865, is as follows: 

Letters received 86,880 

Letters sent 4,635 

Indorsements made 8,8S)0 

The amount of funds received, disbursed, and turned over during 
the year ending November 1, 1865, on account of ''enrollment and 
draft" is as follows: 

Capt. James McMillan, formerly in charge of the First Division, 
received, disbursed, and turned over from November 1, 1864, to 
December 19, 1864 (the date at which he was relieved), the following 
amounts: 

On hand November 1,1864 1304,618.27 

Iteceived since 480,319.43 

Total 684,887.69 

DUbnised 1851,865.75 

Turned over 882,971.94 

Total disbnxsed and tamed over 684,887.69 

Capt. H. R. Rathbone, who succeeded Capt. James McMillan in 
charge of the First Division, received, disbursed, and turned over 
from December 20, 1864, to March 23, 1865 (the date at which he 
was relieved by Capt. J. McL. Hildt), the following amounts: 

Received from Captain McMillan $857,929.54 

Received since 460,084.60 

Total 807,964.04 

Disbursed »485,088.18 

Tamedover 872,875.86 

Total disborsed and tnmedover 807,964.04 

Capt. J. McL. Hildt, who succeeded Capt. H. R. Rathbone in charge 
of the First Division, received, disbursed, and turned over from 
March 23, 1865, to August 31, 1865 (the date at which he was relieved 
from duty in the Provost-Marshal-Generars Bureau), the following 
amounts, viz: 

Received from Capt. H. R. Rathbone .. $267,875.86 

Received since 460,803.99 

Total 718,178.85 

Disbursed $486,905.18 

Turned over :.. 381.278.67 

Total disborsed and turned over 718, 178.85 

Capt. R. Lodor, in charge of Second Division, has received, dis- 
bursed, and turned over from November 1, 1864, to November 1, 1865, 
the following amounts: 

On hand October 81. 1864 $188,072.65 

Received since 1,878,085.89 



208 COBRE8PONDEKCE, ETC. 

Received from Bvt. Lieat. Col. J. McL. Hildt September 1, 1865 ... $145,018.83 

Total 1,686,121.86 

Diflbursed $1,168,253.87 

Turned over 858,800.00 

Total disbursed and turned over 1, 521, 553.87 

Balance on hand November 1, 1865 164,567.99 

Capt. F. H. Barroll, formerly in charge of the Third Division, 
received, disbursed, and turned over from November 1, 1864, to June 
1, 1865 (the date at which he was relieved from duty in the Provost- 
Marshal-GeneraPs Bureau), the following amounts, viz: 

On hand November 1,1864 $41,450.99 

Received since 104,888.08 

Total 146,284.07 

Disbursed $129,259.17 

Turned over 17,024.90 

Total disbursed and turned over 146,284.07 

Capt. Samuel Dana, in charge of the Fourth Division, has received, 
disbursed, and turned over from November 1, 1864, to November 1, 
1865, the following amounts: 

On hand November 1,1864 $84,881.44 

Received since 575,650.45 

Total 660,540.89 

Disbursed $588,218.45 

Turned over 14,000.00 

Total disbursed and turned over 602,218.45 

Balance on hand November 1, 1865 58,827.44 

Maj. T. C. English, Fifth U. S. Infantry, acting assistant provost- 
marshal-general for Portland, Greg., has received, disbursed, and 
turned over from November 1, 1864, to August 31, 1865 (the date of 
his last report), the following amounts, viz: 

On hand November 1, 1864 Nothing. 

Received since $51,000.00 

Disbursed 27,418.26 

Balance on hand August 1, 1865 23,581.74 

Brig. Gen. John S. Mason, formerly acting assistant provost-marshal- 
general for San Francisco, Cal., received, disbursed, and turned over 
from November 1, 1864, to March 28, 1865 (the date of the transfer 
of the funds to Capt. H. B. Fleming, his successor), the following 
amounts, viz: 

On hand November 1,1864 $42,207.60 

Received since 60,085.00 

Total 108,282.60 

Disbursed $21,826.48 

Transferred 81,406.12 

Total disbursed and transferred 108, 282. 60 

Capt. H. B. Fleming, Ninth U. S. Infantry, acting assistant 
provost-marshal-general for San Francisco, Cal., has received, dis- 



UNION AUTHORITIES. 209 

bnrsed, and turned over from March 28, 1865, to September 1, 1865 
(the date of his last return), the following amounts, viz: 

Received from Brigadier-General Maaon $55,406.12 

DisboTHed $10,507.60 

Tranflferred 25,000.00 

Total disborsed and transferred 85,507.60 

Balance on hand September 1,1865 10,808.52 

The amount of funds received, disbursed, and turned over during 
the year ending October 31, 1865, on account of incidental expenses, 
Quartermaster's Department, is as follows, viz : 

Capt. F. H. Barroll, in charge of Third Division, has received, dis- 
bursed, and turned over from November 1, 1864, to June 1, 1865 (the 
date at which he was relieved), the following amounts, viz: 

On hand November 1,1864 $86,868.18 

Reoeivednnce 12,182.40 

Total 48,995.58 

Disbnrsed $11,987.46 

Tnmedover 87,058.07 

Total disbnrsed and tnmed over 48,995.58 

Capt. Samuel Dana, in charge of Fourth Division, has received, 
disbursed, and turned over from June 1, 1865, to November 1, 1866, 
the following amounts, viz : 

On hand Jnne 1,1865 $87,058.07 

Disborsed $51.00 

Tnmedover 8.50 

Total disbnrsed and turned over 69. 50 

Balance on hand October 81, 1865.. 86,998.57 

Capt. Hugh B. Fleming, Ninth U. S. Infantry, acting assistant 
provost-marshal-general for San Francisco, Cal., has received, dis- 
bursed, and turned over from March 28, 1865, to August 31, 1865 (the 
date of his last return), the following amounts, viz: 

On hand $500.00 

Disbursed 170.12 

Balance 829.88 

Capt. S. Dana has received, disbursed, and turned over on account 
of the fund for sick and wounded soldiers during the past year 
the following amounts: 

Beceived $30,000.00 

Disbnrsed : 9,300.00 

Balance on hand November 1, 1865 20, 700.00 

Total amount disbnrsed on account of enrollment and draft during 
the present year 3,175,744.06 

Total amount disbnrsed on account of incidental expenses of 
Qnartermaster's Department daring the present year 12, 158. 58 

Total amount disbnrsed in refunding commutation money to non- 
combatants, from the fund for * ' sick and wounded soldiers " 9, 800. 00 

The amount of commutation money received by receivers thereof 
(collectors of internal revenue) and deposited by them to the credit 

14 R R— SBRIBS in, VOL V 



210 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. 

of the Treasurer of the United States, from November 1, 1864, to 
November 1, 1865, is as follows: 

On accoant of draf t and subBtitntes $317,180.00 

On account of sick and wounded soldiers $387,500.00 

There was also deposited to the credit of the Treasurer 
on account of sick and wounded soldiers by the Provost- 
Marshal-General, beinff funds turned over to him by 

the ez-Govemor of Ohio 3,487.53 

840,987.53 

Total 658.117.53 

There has been disbursed on account of the commutation fund 
the following amounts, as follows : 

PBRCBNTAOB. 

Amount disbursed to receivers in payment of the percentage allowed 
them in conformity with the rates established November 4, 1863, is 
from November 1,1864, to November 1, 1865 $42,781.63 

Amount reimbursed to receivers and paid to others for expenses of 
stationery, blanks, express charges, exchange, postage, &c., from 
November 1,1864, to November 1,1865 2,440.08 

REFUNDED. 

Amount refunded to persons who had paid commutation money and 
furnished substitutes and afterward were exempted for various 
causes, from November 1, 1864, to November 1, 1865: 

By disbursing oflacers of this branch $39,070.00 

By disbursing officers C, D., and O. Branch 10, 500. 00 

Total 60,470.00 

Thinking that a r^um4 of all transactions relating to the com- 
mutation fund would be more satisfactoiy, a statement is herewith 
appended showing the entire amounts received, disbursed, and turned 
over: 

Amount of commutation money received — 

Prior to November 1,1868 $10,518,000.00 

From November 1,1863, to October 31, 1864 15,188,609.35 

Amount received from November 1, 1864, to November 1 , 1865 657, 817. 53 

Total commutation money received from July 22. 1863, to 
October 81, 1864 26,364,516.78 

Amount deposited. to credit of Provost-Marshal-Oeneral from 

July 22 to October 31, 1868 10,518,000.00 

Provost-Marshal-General from November 1, 1863, to October 81, 

1864 4,946,800.00 

Amount deposited to credit of the Treasurer of the United States — 

Prom February 28, 1864, to October 81, 1864 10,242,599.25 

From November 1,1864, to November 1,1865 658,117.53 

Total deposits 26,864,516.78 

Amount deposited on account of— 

Appropriation for draft and substitutes 25,902,029.25 

Sick and wounded 462, 487. 53 

Total 26,864,516.78 

Amount of commutation money deposited by receivers to credit 
of the Treasurer of the United States 10,900,716.78 

Balance in the hands of the Provost-Marshal-Oeneral deposited to 
the credit of the Treasurer in compliance with the joint resolu- 
tion of Congress 7,439,035.20 



UNION AUTHORITIES. 211 

Amount deposited to credit of the Treasaier of the United States 
byCapt.J.McL.Hildt <870.00 

Total 18.840, 021.1W 

Amount of commntation mon^y deposited to the credit of the 

ProTost-Marahal-Qeneral 15,468,800.00 

Amonnt donated... 900.00 

Amonnt left by deserters 742.50 

Amoontoftax 88.45 

Amonnt tamed over by mnstering and disbursing 'olBcers 200,000.00 

Total - 15,665,475.06 

Amonnt disborsed and tamed over to mastering and disbnrsing 
officers by Provo6t-Manihal-(>eneral 8,226,440.75 

Amonnt tnmed over to Treasurer of the United States by Provost- 
Harshal-Qeneral 7,480,086.20 

Total 15,665,475.05 

At the date of the last annual report the total number of officers 
and employ te of the Provost-Mnrshal-Generars Bureau was 4,716, at 
a cost per month of $311,868.60. The number now on duty and in the 
employ of the Bureau is 383, at a cost per month of $35,050.32. It 
is thought that no further requisitions for funds need be made by 
this branch. 

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

H. R. RATHBONE, 
MoQOT and Aaat Adjt Gen-y in Charge Disbursing Branch. 



Wab Department, Adjutant-General's Office, 

Washingionj November 5, 1866, 
His Excellency Charles Anderson, 

GhverrujT of OhiOy ColwmJbus : 

Sir: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of 
the 27th ultimo relative to the muster out of Ohio regiments, and in 
which you refer to your letter of September 16 past, giving in full 
your views on the subject. 

The attention of the Secretary of War has this date been invited to 
both communications, and in reply I have the honor to inform you 
that your letter of the 16th of September was received during the 
absence of the Secretary and was not then considered by him, but 
referred to the GeneraMn-Chief for his information and retained at 
his headquarters until receipt of your recent letter. No reply to it 
was sent you, but the views expressed, taken in connection with sim- 
ilar ones from authorities of other States, were duly considered, and 
no means have been spared to hasten the muster out of volunteer 
organizations as rapidly as their services could be dispensed with. 

Since the letter of September 16 many Ohio organizations have 
been discharged, and of the eighteen (seventeen regiments and one 
battery) yet reported as in service thirteen regiments are in Texas. 
Major-General Sheridan has recently ordered the discharge of some 
additional troops, and it is believed that some from your State will 
be ombraced, although the organizations selected have not yet been 
reported. All volunteer troops are being relieved in the field and 
mustered out as rapidly as the public interest will permit; but as 



212 COBBE8PONDENGE, ETC. 

from necessity some organizations have to be retained longer than 
others, an order for the discharge of all at the same time cannot be 
given. 

The attention of the commanding general of the Department of the 
Missouri has been invited to the discharge of the Eleventh Ohio Cav- 
alry, specially referred to in your letter of the 27th ultimo. 

I have the honor to remain, sir, very respectfully, your obedient 
servant 

THOMAS M. VINCENT, 

AssistarU AdjiUarU- General. 



Washington, November 6, 1865. 
Maj. Gen. G. G. Meade, 

Commanding Military Division of the Atlantic: 

In view of the x>caceful condition of the South, I think now the 
number of interior posts held may be materially reduced in number, 
and where regular ti-oops are used they can generally be one and two 
company posts. In this way you may be enabled to discharge from 
service most of the white volunteers still remaining within your 
command. 

I wish you would send one or more of your staff officers through 
the Southern States of the command with full instructions to desig- 
nate the posts to be held [and] the garrisons to be put in them. Let 
all surplus troops then be mustered out of service. Instruct your 
inspectors to see that all previous orders for the reduction of trans- 
portation and expenses in every way be carried out. Let them also 
report all public property which in their judgment may be removed 
or sold with advantage to the public service. 

Property is many times so scattered as to make a large force neces- 
sary for performing guard duty alone, where, but for the public prop- 
erty to be cared for, but few troops would be necessary. Let this 
subject receive attention also. 

U. S. GRANT, 

L/ievienant' General. 



Quartermaster-General's Office, 

Washingigrij November 8, 1865. 
Hon. Edwin M. Stanton, 

Secretary of War: 
Sir: I have the honor to submit the annual report of operations of 
the Quartermaster's Department during the fiscal year ending 30th 
of June, 1865: 

On the 1st of Jnly, 1864, the balance of appropriation in the Treas- 
ury nndrawn was $8,099,768.16 

Appropriation for fiscal year ending 80th of Jane, 1865 199, 250, 000. 00 

Deficiency bill, March 2,1865 83,181,137.00 

Appropriation for fiscal year ending 30th of June, 1866 168, 500, 000. 00 

Total 459,630,905.16 

Requisitions on Treasury in fiscal year ending 30th of Jane, 1865. 431, 706, 057. 44 

Balance remaining 30th of June. 1865 27,924,847.72 

A financial statement in detail will be found in a table at the end 
of this report. 



UNION AUTHOBITIEB. 218 

This department is charged with the duty of providing means of 
tran8x>ortation by land and water for all the troops and for all the 
material of war. It furnishes the horses for artillery and cavalry, 
and the horses and mules of the wagon trains; provides and supplies 
tents, camp and garrison equipage, forage, lumber, and all materials 
for camps and for shelter of the troops. It builds barracks, hospi- 
tals, and store-houses; provides wagons and ambulances, harness, 
except for cavalry and artillery horses; builds or chai-ters ships and 
steamers, docks, and wharves; constructs and repairs roads, railroads, 
and their bridges; clothes the Army, and is charged generally with the 
payment of all expenses attending military operations not assigned 
hy law or regulation to some other department. 

While the Ordnance Department procures and issues arms and 
ammunition, and the Subsistence Department supplies provisions, and 
l^e Medical Department medical and hospital stores, the Quartermas- 
ter's Department is called ux)on to transport the stores of all these 
departments from the dei)Ots to the camps, upon the march, and to 
the battle-field, where they are finally issued to the troops. 

These duties have been efficiently x>erformed during the year. 

In the last, as in former years of the war, under the energetic and 
liberal administration of the War Department, the wants of the troops 
have been regularly supplied, their comfort, health, and efficiency 
have been amply and regularly provided for. The Army itself does 
justice to the wise and enlarged administration which has enabled it 
to move successfully in a field of warfare constantly widening. 

Atlanta, the key of the rebel defense, was secured after a campaign 
involving a line of operations of 300 miles in length, maintained for 
months through a hostile country so effectually as to enable an army 
of 90,000 men, with over 40,000 animals, to subsist not only while 
advancing, but, what is much more difficult, while laying siege for 
weeks to that advanced ix)sition. 

The enemy's army, driven from Atlanta, but still formidable in 
numbers and in courage, threw itself upon this long line of oper- 
ations — ^two slender n^s of iron, crossing wide rivers, winding 
through mountain gorges, plunging under the mountain ranges, and 
eveiywhere exposed to the raids of an enterprising enemy, favored 
by the thick forests which bordered the railroad throughout nearly 
its whole extent. 

The guards of the i>osts upon the line of communication did their 
duty, and the Railroad Construction Corps of this department, thor- 
oughly oi^anized, strong in numbers, in skill, and in discipline, 
repaired broken bridges and railroads. New engines from the work- 
shops of the North replaced those which torpedoes or broken rails 
threw from the track. Trains loaded with timber, with iron, with 
water and fuel for the engines, preceded the trains of subsistence 
and ammunition, and scarce was the communication broken before it 
was re-established. 

The conquering army followed the desperate garrison of Atlanta 
and drove him off the lines of communication. The railroad was 
worked night and day to its full capacit>y; supplies for a new cam- 
paign for an army of 90,000 men were i)Oured into Atlanta. All 
surplus stores, all sick and all enfeebled men were sent by railroad to 
the rear, and the army of General Sherman, with its 3,000 wagons full 
loaded with every material of war, accompanied by droves of many 
thousand beef -cattle, re-enforced by the return of those who, disabled 
in the earlier events of the campaign, had been recruited in the 



214 

hospitals of Nashville, 300 miles to the rear, and forwarded by rail- 
road to resume their places in its ranks, marched out of Atlanta, 
blew up that depot, destroyed all the railroads which made that city 
of value in the war, and bent its steps toward the ocean. 

In no other country have railroads been brought to jierform so 
important a part- in the operations of war. Scarce in any other 
country could be found the workmen to perform the feats of construc- 
tion which have illustrated this campaign. 

At no time during the march from Chattanooga to Atlanta were 
the railroad trains five days behind the general commanding. 

The reconstruction of the bridges over the Etowah and the Chat- 
tahoochee are unparalleled feate of military construction. 
. The Etowah bridge, 625 feet long, 75 feet high, was burned by the 
rebels, and was rebuilt by the labor of 600 men of the Construction 
Corps in six days. 

The Chattahoochee bridge, six miles from Atlanta, is 740 feet long 
and 90 feet high, and was built in four and a half days by 600 men of 
the Construction Corps. 

The army under General Sherman moved southeast from Atlanta; 
it plunged into the forests and sands of Georgia and was lost to our 
view. The rebel army moved into Tennessee and advanced upon 
Nashville, to be dashed in pieces against the army of Major-General 
Thomas, and thus perished the last great army of the rebellion in the 
central South and West, east of the Mississippi. 

The rebel press reported defeats, disastei*s, repulses to the army, 
with which we had no communication. No anxiety as to their fate 
oppressed the minds of those who had in the War Department 
directed the measures and provisions for their equipment for this bold 
and decisive march. A bare possibility that, by the abandonment of 
all eastern positions, the rel)el Army of Virginia might throw itself 
across Sherman's path, induced the department to order supplies to 
Pensacola, to relieve any immediate wants should the army be obliged 
to move southward; but the great work of preparation to meet and 
refit this array upon the southeastern Atlantic Coast was at once com- 
menced and steadily prosecuted. While a few vessels went to Pen- 
sacola to await orders, a great fleet of transports was collected at 
Port Royal, laden with everything that experience indicat-ed as neces- 
sary to repair the consumption and the losses of this adventurous 
march. Clothing, shoes, shelter tents, forage, provisions, spare parts 
of wagons, wagons complete, harness, leather, wax, thread, needles, 
and tools for all the trades which were plied on the march and in the 
camp were collected in the harbor of Hilton Head. 

All this was done in the dead of winter. Light-draft, frail river 
steamei-s trusted themselves, under daring Yankee captains and 
crews, to the storms of the stormiest coast of the world, and all 
arrived safely at their destination. And here let me pay a tribute to 
those gallant seamen of the merchant shipping of the Natioii, who in 
war entered its transport fleet. No service has been so difficult or so 
tedious — none so dangerous as to discourage or to daunt them. 

No call for volunteers has ever failed to meet a ready response, 
whether to tempt the shoals and storms of a tempestuous coast, the 
hidden and mysterious dangers of the dark bayous of the South, 
strewn with torpedoes by the devilish ingenuity of deserters from our 
own military and naval service, or to run in frail river steam-boate 
the batteries of the Potomac, the James, and the Pamlico, or the still 
more formidable works of Vicksburg. Urged by the spirit of adven- 



UNION AUTHORITIES. 215 

ture, supported by the patriotism of freemen, they have always stood 
ready, and have cheerfully obeyed every order, incurred every risk. 

On the 13th of December Fort McAllister fell before the assault of 
General Sherman's veterans. The transport fleet was ordered at once 
to the mouths of the Ogeechee and of the Savannah. The city of 
Savannah was carried within a few days, and a wrecking party, then 
employed upon the coast of Florida, with all the ingenious equipment 
which modern science has contrived for submarine operations, was 
towed by a steamer to the Savannah River and set to work to remove 
the formidable obstacles to its navigation. These for four years 
seemed to have employed all the ingenuity and mechanical skill of the 
people, who had torn up the pavements of their commercial streets to 
supply mat'erial to obstruct the channels of their harbor. 

In a few days a passage was cleared, and the steamers and vessels 
of the transport fleet discharged their cargoes at the long-disused and 
dilapidated wharves of Savannah, and sailed for the North richly 
freighted with captured cotton. 

On the 22d of January General Sherman again moved northward. 

A division of the Railroad Construction Corps had been ordered from 
the Tennessee to the Savannah to meet him. It had crossed the AUe- 
ghanies in midwinter and was promptly at the rendezvous with men 
and officers and all tools, materials, and machinery for rebuilding the 
railroads of the coast. 

It was decided not to operate directly against Charleston, the great 
stronghold of the rebellion, which had for four years defied our ships 
and the forces we could spare for the siege. The wiser and more 
daring plan of marching inland, cutting oft its means of supply, cap- 
turing the capital, and devastating the agricultural portion of the 
State, was pursued. 

Charleston soon fell and the Construction Corps was moved to More- 
head City, there to open up the railroad from the harbor of Beaufort, 
N. C, toward Kinston, at which point General Sherman, when I 
parted from him in January — ^his army reclad, reshod, supplied, and 
ready to resume its march — told me to look out for him next. 

His chief quartermaster, General Easton, who had accompanied the 
army in its march from Chattanooga to Savannah, remained on' the 
coast, taking charge of the fleet lo£Mded with supplies. The fleet and 
supplies were transferred to the harbor of Beaufort. Fort Fisher fell 
in January and the Cape Fear River was opened to our transports. 
The troops which had captured, with the aid of the navy, the defenses 
at the mouth of this river, re-enforced by the Twenty-third Army 
Corps, which in January was transferred from the Tennessee to the 
Atlantic, captured Wilmington and advanceil toward Goldsborough. 
The two railroads, e/ich ninety-five miles in length, from Wilmington 
and from Morehead City to Goldsborough, were repaired by the Con- 
struction Corps. They were stocked with cars and engines, and when 
the Right Wing of General Sherman's army entered Goldsborough 
on the 22d of March it met supplies of provisions brought by the 
railroads from the transport, fleet on the coast, and found Golds- 
borough occupied by a corps which on the 15th of January had been 
encamped on the banks of the Tennessee. 

Again was the army supplied with fuU equipment of clothing, 
shoes, and of all the various articles of necessity for itself and its 
trains, worn out in the long march from Savannah, and by the 10th 
of April, the appointed day, fully equipped, it moved against the 
enemy at Raleigh. 



216 COREESPONDENCE, ETC. 

Upon the surrender of the rebel armies in Virginia and North 
Carolina the armies of Greneral Sherman and of Lieutenant-Creneral 
Grant marched for Washington, where they were reviewed by the 
President and Cabinet, after which they went into camp on the heights 
surrounding the capital, and the preparations for their transfer to 
other fields of operation and for their disbandment were made. 

While the coast was the scene of the efforts of the department to 
support and supply the army of General Sherman, the armies in front 
of Richmond also required a vast expenditure. These armies were 
stronger in numbers than General Sherman's. Their equipment for 
march as well as for siege was constantly kept in the highest state 
of efficiency. The country in which they lay furnished no supplies, 
and food and forage and all stores were brought by rail and by sea 
from the North and Northwest. The shipments of forage alone to the 
armies on the James averaged over $1,000,000 per month throughout 
the winter. 

The tables at the end of this report give information as to the 
strength of the fleet and the magnitude of the operations involved in 
the supply from distant ports of an army over 100,000 in strength, 
with at times over 5,000 wagons to keep in repair and over 65,000 
animals, horses, and mules to be fed. 

From the depots in the West, under the general direction of Bvt. 
Maj. Gren. Robert Allen, senior quartermaster in the Mississippi 
VaUey, the wants of the armies on the Tennessee, the Cumberland, 
the Mississippi, the Missouri, the Arkansas, and the Gulf of Mexico 
were supplied. 

The Northwest was the store-house from which were drawn subsist- 
ence, forage, and all other material which, by steam-boats and rail- 
road trains, were distributed to the posts. 

Lists of steamers employed on the Atlantic, upon the Gulf, and upon 
the Western rivers are attached to this report. 

The transport fleet exceeded 1,000 vessels of every variety of con- 
struction, impelled by sail or steam. Details of this fleet and its cost 
will be found in another part of this report. 

Great movements of troops continued to be made. The army of 
General Thomas, having dispersed the rebel army in the campaign 
which culminated in the battle of Nashville, on the 15th and 16th of 
December, 1864, and the pursuit which followed it, was divided. The 
Twenty-third Corps, under General Schofield, 15,000 strong, was in 
January, as hereinafter detailed, transported to the coast of North 
Carolina to co-operate with General Sherman, expected at Kinston. 
The Sixteenth Corps, under General A. J. Smith, 17,000 strong, with 
artillery and baggage trains, was sent to New Orleans to co-operate 
with the troops then under General Canby in the reduction of Mobile. 

The cavalry, under Major-General Wilson, was refitted, remounted, 
equipped, and launched into the interior of Alabama to capture the 
principal interior cities of Alabama and Georgia. Selma, Montgomery, 
Columbus, and Macon fell before them. 

In all these movements the troops were kept well supplied with the 
necessary material. Horses, forage, food, and clothing were promptly 
delivered at the appointed rendezvous and depots, and steamers were 
ready on river and coast to move the troops and their supplies 
promptly. 

During the whole year — I believe I may say during the whole war — 
no movement was delayed, no enterprise failed, for want of means 
of transportation or the supplies required from the Quartermaster's 
Department. 



UNION AUTHORITIES. 217 

The close of hostilities made even greater exertions on the part of 
this department necessary. Two hundred and thirty-three thousand 
men were distributed from Washington alone to their homes in the 
North— carried to every hamlet and village, camps of discharge being 
established in every State, at which the regiments rendezvoused until 
paid off, when the men dispersed. 

Sixty thousand men of the army of General Sherman were moved 
from Washington to Louisville, from which place, after a short time, 
they were put in motion for tlieir homes and discharged. Twenty- 
five thousand men were moved from the James River to the Rio 
Grande. Seven thousand were sent from the Potomac to Savannah. 
Sixty thousand prisoners of war, released, were sent to their homes in 
the Southern States. 

Regiments were brought from the Gulf and South Atlantic coasts 
and sent to their States to be discharged. Their places were in some 
cases supplied by the transfer to the South of the regiments which 
had longer to serve. A large force of cavalry was moved from the 
Potomac to the Arkansas and to the Western plains. 

The activity of the transportation branch of this department has 
never been greater than since the cessation of hostilities, its duty 
embracing the transportation to their homes of the greater part of an 
army of a million men, the collection and transportation to depots, 
for storage or for sale, of the animals and stores surplus from the rapid 
reduction in the forces employed. 

Officers were sent to inspect the various depots and posts to report 
what stores should be sold and what preserved. Stringent orders were 
issued directing reductions in purchases, in lists of persons employed, 
ordering the sale of surplus material,the reduction of the strength of 
the trains, the sale of all surplus animals of the cavalry, artillery, and 
trains, and the discharge or sale of transports not needed for the 
returning troops. Reports in detail herewith contain such informa- 
tion as to these operations as can be collected at this time and embraced 
within the limits of this report. 

The examination, collation, and analysis of the records of this depart- 
ment are not complete. The material is abundant, and I propose, 
with your approbation, to establish a board of officers whose business 
it shall be to collect from the official reports full statistics of the vast 
operations which, during the last four years, have taxed the fullest 
enei^ies of every officer of ability and experience in this department. 

The work has been accomplished, the record is in possession of the 
office, but the labors of execution have not left leisure for that exam- 
ination and comparison of the records which is necessary for a full 
statistical report of operations of this department during the four 
years of war. 

In the last annual report I had the honor to make nominal report of 
the officers who held the most important and responsible positions in 
this department during the previous year, and to call attention to 
their merits and their worth. Many of these officers have received 
the promotion which they have so well deserved, and which they so 
highly prize as the recognition by their Government of faithful serv- 
ice. I am grateful for the recognition of the service and success of 
the department under my control thus given to its officers. 

The general distribution of duties has not materially varied during 
the year. The officers had, in the course of three years of active serv- 
ice, generally found the positions in which their respective qualities 
made them of the greatest service to their country. 



218 CORRBBPONDENCE, ETC. 

Bvt. Maj. Gen. Robert Allen continued to exerewe the authority 
and control with which he had been invested as senior and supervis- 
ing quartermaster in the Valley of the Mississippi. His duties have 
remained the same as during the previous years. His annual report 
is herewith. Had it been more full in detail it would have given a 
better idea of the magnitude of his responsibilities, his labors, and 
his merits. There passed through his hands during the fiscal year 
$33,933,646.45. 

Bvt. Maj. Gen. Rufus Ingalls continued in the field to control the 
service of the quartermaster's department with the armies operating 
under Lieutenant-General Grant against Richmond. 

The admirable manner in which the duties of his post were per- 
formed is shown in the efiiciency of the operations which supplied the 
troops during the long siege and the rapid marches which, after the 
enemy was driven from his works, resulted in the capture of his 
entire army. The disbursements have been (under his direction) 
$1,636,759.08, principally for wages of workmen. The supplies for 
this army were purchased under direction of this office and shipped 
to it from the depots at the North, as required. 

Bvt. Maj. Gen. D. H. Rucker has continued in charge of the great 
depot of Washington, the depot through which a great part of the 
supplies of the armies before Richmond and upon the Atlantic Ck>ast 
passed. Here the animals and the clothing for these armies were col- 
lected. To this point their worn-out and disabled animals and equip- 
ment were returned for recuperation or repair, or to be disposed of 
and replaced. 

Upon this depot, after the fall of Richmond, 250,000 troops were 
concentrated, and here wei*e made all the arrangements for their trans- 
portation to the West and North before their final dispersion. The 
expenditures of the year under his direction have been $8,822,065.33. 

Bvt. Maj. Gen. James L. Donaldson has continued in charge of 
the great base of supplies of the armies of Sherman and Thomas. 
He is now supervising quartermaster of the Military Division of the 
Tennessee, and is engaged in the supply of the troops still quartered 
in the South and in returning them as discharged to their homes, 
and in disposing of the vast accumulation of stores no longer needed 
since the cessation of hostilities and consequent reduction of the 
Army. He has controlled the expenditure of $24,821,005.79. 

Bvt. Brig. Gen. Thomas Swords, senior quartermaster in the De- 
partment of the Ohio, assisted by Colonel Moulton, has been in charge 
of the ox>erations of the department at the important depot of Cin- 
cinnati, which has furnished nearly one-third of the clothing for the 
armies of the United States. He has received and distributed to 
other officers or disbursed during the year $17,402,501.95. 

Bvt. Brig. Gen. G. H. Crosman, who had been on duty in Philadel- 
phia from the 30th of August, 1861, to the 24th of August, 1864, in 
charge of the Philadelphia depot and the providing of clothing and 
equipage, was then temporarily relieved by Col. A. J. Perry, chief of 
the division of clothing and equipage. He has since been engaged 
in preparing a manual of the service of the Quartermaster's Depart- 
ment, intended to fix the forms, sizes, and construction and qualities 
of the various articles of equipment which are supplied by the Quar- 
termaster's Department, in order that the experience gained in all 
these details may not be lost, but may be at hand to instruct the 
officers of the deimrtment in future operations. The records and 



UNION AXJTHOBITIE8. 219 

details of these models should be preserved. They have enabled 
oar armies to make unexampled marches with less suffering, priva- 
tion, sickness, and loss than we find recorded in the history of the 
campaigns of other nations. His disbursements have been during 
the year $6,274,278.55. 

Bvt. Brig. Gen. D. H. Vinton has continued at the head of the 
depot of clothing and equipage at New York. No officer has more 
thoroughly and efficiently pe^ormed his duty. He has received and 
expended (34,637,511.11. 

Bvt. Brig. Gren. L. C. Easton, chief quartermaster of the army of 
General Sherman, accomx>anied that army in its campaign from Chat- 
tanooga, and during the siege of Atlanta superintended its outfit for 
and accompanied its march to the sea. At Savannah he took charge 
of the transport fleet and of the stores sent to meet the army on the 
coast, conducted them to the coast of North Carolina, and sent for- 
ward the supplies which, by the 10th of April, enabled it again to 
march against the rebels at Raleigh. After the dispersion and reduc- 
tion of the army he was assigned to duty ftB chief quartermaster at 
the headquarters of the major-general commanding the Military 
Division of the Mississippi, with his ix)st at Saint Louis, where he exer- 
cises a general supervision and control. He has received and 
accounted for $981,822.27. 

Bvt. Brig. G^en. Charles Thomas, assistant quartermaster-general, 
has aided me in the management of the business of this office, hav- 
ing charge of the finances and accounts of the office. 

Bvt. Brig. Gren. William Myers, as chief assistant to General Robert 
Allen in the Mississippi Valley, has been in charge of the depot at 
Saint Louis. His responsibilities have been great and have been 
met to the satisfaction and approbation of his senior officers. Gen- 
eral Allen, in his report, speaks of him in the highest terms. He 
reports the receipt and exjienditure or transfer of $49,871,975.35. 

Bvt. Brig. Gen. Stewart Van Vliet has continued at New York in 
chaise of the operations of the department at that important post. 
His disbursements and transfers during the year have reached the 
sum of $20,170,162.00. 

Col. C. W. Moulton has been, during a portion of the fiscal year, 
in charge of the clothing and equipage depot at Cincinnati. He reports 
the receipt and expenditure of $31,287,324.49. 

Bvt. Brig. Gen. George S. Dodge, chief quartermaster of the Army 
of the James, accompanied the naval and military expedition which 
reduced Fort Fisher, on the coast of North Carolina. He displayed 
great energy and skill in disembarking upon an open coast men and 
material for the siege and assault of that formidable work, and was 
specially rewarded by brevet promotion for signal services on that 
occasion. He has since been actively employed in extensive inspec- 
tions, both North and South, which have been most efficiently per- 
formed and have aided this department in enforcing great reductions 
of expenditure. Ho is a most deserving officer. 

Col. William W. McKim, for some time in charge of the depot of 
Cincinnati, has been in charge of the depot at Philadelphia, including 
the operations of the great depot of clothing and equipage at the 
Schuylkill Arsenal, since the 15th of February last. He is a most 
efficient and deserving officer. He reports an expenditure during the 
year of $24,986,188.16. 

The depot of Baltimore has been in charge of Col R. M. Newport 
since the 24th of September, 18G4. In the earlier part of the fiscal year 



220 COBBSSPOHDENCBy ETC. 

it was under charge of Maj. C. W. Thomas, Qaartermaster's Dei»art* 
ment. Colonel Newport's expenditures and transfers are reported at 
$8,167,971.73. 

Col. S. B. Holabird has continued on duty at New Orleans, where 
his long experience and his business capacity have made his service 
most valuable. He accompanied the army of Greneral Banks to Loui- 
siana when that officer first assumed command in the Southwest, and 
has always been zealous and successful in the discharge of the heavy 
duties which have been imposed ni)on him. His receipts, transfers, 
and expenditures during the year were $15,290,396.67. 

Col. C. G. Sawtelle, as chief quartermaster of the command, first of 
Greneral Canby, and lately of the troops and military division under 
Major-General Sheridan, has rendered most valuable service. As 
chief quartermaster of General Canby's army, he directed the oper- 
ations of the quartermaster's department in the movements against 
Mobile. After the fall of Mobile, and the assignment of Major-Gen- 
eral Sheridan to command in the Southwest, he was attached to his 
staff as chief quartermaster of the military division, and forwarded 
the army which was sent from New Orleans to Texas, including the 
later movements of the Twenty-fifth Army Corps, which, embarking 
on the James, rendezvoused on the northern coast of the Gulf of 
Mexico, before proceeding to Texas. He reports the receipt, trans- 
fer, and expenditure during the fiscal year of $684,857.45. 

The principal disbursements in the command to which he is attached 
have been made by officers at depots. 

The limits of this report will not permit me to notice here all the 
officers of the department who have held important positions during 
the extended operations of the last year of this most active and event- 
ful war. I mention the names merely of some of the officers whose 
merits have promoted them to most imx>ortant positions. 

Lists of officers of the Quartermaster's Department who have served 
as chief quartermasters of armies, of great territorial divisions, and 
in charge of important depots, and of those who have been specially 
noted in the records received at this office for good service, are 
attached to this report. 

The officers who have been my personal assistants in charge of the 
several divisions of this office are noticed in referring to the branches 
of the service in which they have had special control. 

HORSES AND MULBS. 

The purchase and supply of the animals of the Army pertains to 
the First Division of this office, of which Bvt. Brig. Gen. James A. 
Ekin, of the Quartermaster's Department, has charge. He reports: 

Purchases of cavaby horses dnrine the year ending Jane 90, 1865 141 , 632 

Total from January 1 , 1864, to May 9, 1865, at which time purchases ceased. 198, 888 
Of artillery horses, from September 1, 1864, to June 30, 1865, purchases 

having ceased May 9 20,714 

Of mules, from July 1, 1864, to June 80, 1865, purchases having ceased 

May 9 58,818 

The earlier purchases of horses delivered in Washington at the 
beginning of the war were at $125. Subsequently, for a time, horses 
were delivered here as low as $100. The price gradually advanced 
until the close of the war. 

The prices of cavalry horses during the last fiscal year have varied 

from : $144 to $185 

Of artillery horses 161 to 185 

Of mules 170 to 195 



UNION AUTHORITIES. 221 

Thei« have been sold at the depots since January 1, 1864, of cavalry 

horses 40,070 

There have died at these depots 88,277 

Artillery horses reported as having died at the depots, September 1, 

1854, to June 80, 1865 484 

Males sold September 1,1864, to June 80, 1865 18,479 

Died in depots in same time 7,886 

The deaths rei)orted occurred at depots principally among animals 
sent in from the field as broken down and unserviceable. 

The destruction in the field was greater, probably nearly equaling 
the number supplied by purchase and capture, as neither the trains 
nor the cavalry of the armies have been materially increased during 
the last year of the war, and the purchases have been almost entirely 
to supply losses. 

The issues of cavalry horses to the Army of the Shenandoah, actively 
engaged under Major-General Sheridan, have been at the rate of 
three remounts per annum. The service of a cavalry horse under an 
enterprising commander has therefore averaged only four months. 

Of the animals which are sent to the depots for recuperation about 
60 per cent, recovered, and, becoming serviceable, have again been 
issued. 

SALES. 

There hf>.ve been sold, so far as reported, to October 17, and since 
May 8, 1865, and in accordance with Qeneral Orders, No. 28, of the 
Quartermaster-G^nerars Office, dated May 8, 1865, 53,794 horses and 
52,516 mules, for the sum of $6,107,618.14. It is probable that when 
the full returns are received the total amount of sales from May 8 to 
October 17 will prove to exceed $7,000,000. 

With few exceptions these sales have been made by persons 
employed at fixed daily rates by the Quartermaster's Department. In 
a few cases officers who have failed to receive the general order of the 
Quartermaster-General prescribing this mode of sale have employed 
local auctioneers at various rates of compensation. The results in 
most cases have been less satisfactory than when the sales have been 
made in the first mode, and such sales have given rise to some com- 
plaints of excessive fees. All the officers of the department now, it 
is believed, have received General Orders, No. 42, Quartermaster-Gren- 
eral's Office, 1865, and understand their duty in this respect. 

Creneral Ekin names the officers who have acted under his orders in 
the business of providing and disposing of animals of the Army, and 
bears testimony to their good service, for which I respectfully refer 
to his report, herewith. 

He reports the expenditures of the fiscal year as follows: 

Od hand July 1, 1864, and received during the fiscal year $8,501,078.84 

Expended $8,719,070.18 

Transferred to officers 4,295,968.72 

8,015,088.85 

Bemaining to hia credit Jxme 80, 1865 486,044.99 

Estimates of onartermasters for purchase of horses, submitted to 
and approvea by him dnring the year: 

For horses 28,800,456.66 

For mules 6,434,687.66 

Total 80,086,094.88 



222 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. 

CLAIMS FOR ANIMALS. 

Under the law of July 4, 1864, 4,174 claims for animals have been 
filed in the First Division of the Quartermaster-General's Office; of 
these 2,792 have been acted on, leaving 1,382 not acted on. This 
business is increasing rapidly. 

General Ekin states, succinctly, some of the difficulties attending 
just decisions upon these claims. Generally when the animals have 
been taken by officers of this department, reference to the official 
records shows that they have been properly reported and accounted for. 

But when officers' papers have been captured by the enemy or 
destroyed, and where the seizure has been made by officers not of the 
Quartermaster's Department, as many of the officers have been dis- 
charged from the service, it is difficult to communicate with them by 
letter, and to ascertain whether the signatures and memorandum 
receipts offered in evidence are true or forged. To arrive at certain 
conclusions upon evidence entirely ex parley and without cross-exam- 
ination, is impossible, and this department will be unable to arrive at 
that conviction necessary to enable it to report many claims, some of 
them no doubt just, without some further action. It ma3% after a 
time, become expedient to create boards of officers to visit the locali- 
ties in which most of these claims originate, and there take testimony 
as to the facts, the truth of the documentary evidence presented, and 
especially as to the loyalty of the claimants and witnesses. Judging 
from the papers presented with these claims, there are few persons 
unable to present certificates of loyalty. 

Copies of the more important orders regulating the mode of pur- 
chasing and disposing of public animals accompany this report. 

They are the result of the experience gained during a great war, in 
which the consumption of horses and mules has been very large. 
The specifications have been amended from time to time as experience 
has shown defects. 

Under the system which these orders and regulations set forth the 
Army has been well supplied with animals adapted to the military 
service. The order, regularity, and abundance of supply, the cor- 
rectness and clearness of the record of this branch of the service, 
since the organization of the First Division of this office, are most 
creditable to Bvt. Brig. Gen. James A. Ekin, who has been at its head. 

CLOTHING AND EQUIPAGE. 

The clothing and equipage of the Army are provided by contract, 
by purchase, and by manufacture at the several principal depots, 
which during the fiscal year have been: 

New York depot, under charge of Bvt. Brig. Gen. D. H. Vinton, 
Quartermaster's Department. 

Philadelphia depot, under charge, successively, of Bvt. Brig. Gen. 
G. H. Crosman, Col. A. J. Perry, Col. and Bvt. Brig. Gen. H. Biggs, 
and Col. W. W. McKim, who is still in charge. 

Cincinnati depot, under charge of Bvt. Brig. Gen. Thomas Swords, 
Col. C. W. Moulton, Col. W. W. McKim, who, on his transfer to Phil- 
adelphia, was relieved by Col. C. W. Moulton. 

Saint Louis depot, under charge of Bvt. Brig. Gren. William Myers, 
Quartermaster's Department. 

There are several branch depots established at points at which the 
war had collected many destitute women, either of the families of ref u- 



UNION AUTHORITIES. 



223 



gees or of soldiers, whom employment in making up army clothing 
relieved from dependence upon public charity. 

These depots were supplied with material from the three principal 
depots of New York, Philadelphia, and Cincinnati, and their oper- 
ations were confined to the making up of such material into garments. 

Such depots are established at Quincy, HI., and Steuben ville, Ohio. 

The quality of the clothing and equipment furnished to the Army 
has been excellent; very few complaints of inferior quality have been 
made, considering the immense quantity of material which has been 
issued to the troops. The marches made from Atlanta to Savannah, 
and from Savannah to Goldsborough, by armies which during their 
marches had no opportunity to replace articles of equipment worn 
out, are evidence of the good quality of the shoes and clothing with 
which the Army is supplied. 

Of the principal articles of clothing and equipage the following 
quantities have been purchased and manufactured at the three prin- 
cipal depots during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1865: 

Uniform coata 811,507 

Uniform jackets 410,667 

Uniform trouserB 8,468,858 

Drawers 8,708,308 



Shirts, flamiel 8,268,166 

Greatcoats 878,280 

Blankets: 

Woolen 1,746,084 

Waterproof 635,624 

Canteens 1,163,347 

Hospital tents 10,265 

Wafl-tents 8,412 

Wedge or conunon tents 1, 412 

Shelter tents... 608,187 

Bedsacks 10,610 

Begimental colors 1,321 

Camp colors 4, 167 

National colors. . 760 

Flags 4,185 

The stock on hand ready for issue on the 30th of June, 1865, but not 
transferred to the armies for issue, was: 



Blonses 2,617,874 

Shoes pairs.- 1,688,017 

Boots do-.. 050,548 

Stockings.. .do.-. 5,684,572 

Hats 442,832 

Caps 1,151,048 

Knapsacks 058,287 

Haversacks 1,066,647 

Guidons 1,203 

Picks 42,446 

Axes 108,106 

Spades and shovels 150,081 

Hatchets 88,054 

Mess-pans 160,206 

Camp-kettles 73,805 

Bugles 8,705 

Drums 16,880 

Fifes 1,400 



Uniform coats 462,105 

Uniform jackets 504,811 

Uniform trousers _-. 1,185,234 

Drawers 1,166,541 

Shuts, flannel- 1,542,204 

Greatcoats 020,725 

Blankets: 

Woolen _ 1,000,106 

Waterproof 884,075 

Blouses I,410,a50 

Shoes pairs.. 1,582,156 

Boots do... 485,082 

Stockings do... 1,803,710 

Hats 807,505 

Caps 026,022 

Axes 00,548 

Spades and shovels 152,523 

Hatchets 111,247 

Hess-pans 864,086 



Camp-kettles 106,417 

Knapsacks 868, 578 

Haversacks 522, 621 

Canteens 845,200 

Hospital tents 6,121 

Wafl-tents 15,672 

Wedge or common tents 53, 002 

Shelter tents 701,254 

Bedsacks 167,087 

Regimental colors 780 

Camp colors 7,270 

National colors 600 

Flags 7,607 

Guidons 2, 030 

Picks 103,228 

Bugles 8,803 

Trumpets 8,860 

Drums 5,865 

Fifes 11,747 



For further details of the supply of clothing, camp and garrison 
equipage, during the fiscal year, and during the whole war, I respect- 
fully refer to the tables accompanying this report. They give infor- 
mation as to the quantities of the various materials purchased, as well 



224 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. 

as of the articles mannfactured therefrom, or purchased ready made, 
in a compact form and with greater precision than is i)Ossible in this 
narrative. 
There have been purchased during the fiscal year — 

Cloth and other materialfl to the value of $81,416,858.84 

Clothing 70,087,282.20 

Equipage 18,615.801.09 

The expenditure for all objects relating to clothing and equipage, 
including payment of rents, compensation to workmen, cferkB, 
and others, at the principal depots, has been during the year end- 
ing June 80, 1865 106,019,406.18 

Two of the tables herewith give approximately the quantities of 
material and of ready-made articles of clothing and equipage, which 
the three principal depots have supplied during the war. 

At the commencement of the war the department had but one 
depot for the supply of clothing and equipage, the Schuylkill Arsenal, 
at Philadelphia. This was organized for the equipment of an army 
of 13,000 men. The material was purchased by contract from manu- 
factories, and the clothing, shoes, Ac, were made up at the arsenal. 

The sudden increase of the Army made it necessary to greatly 
enlarge the operations of this depot and to establish new ones, and 
also to accept the aid of State authorities in providing the clothing of 
the numerous regiments of volunteers oi^anizing in every district in 
the country. Eight thousand or 10,000 work-people were employed in 
Philadelphia in the manufacture of clothing and equipage. The new 
depots established at New York and Cincinnati went into operation 
early in 1862, under energetic and able officers. Contracts were made 
for the supply of clothing ready made. The manufacturers of the 
loyal States were urged to turn their machinery upon army goods. 
The clothing merchants who had before the war supplied the South- 
ern markets made contracts with the department for the supply of 
army clothing, and in a few months the industry and manufacturing 
power of the country were turned into the new channel, and the diffi- 
culties at first experienced in procuring a sufficient supply for the 
immense army which sprang into being ceased. 

The only domestic branch of manufacture which has not shown 
capacity to supply the Army is that of blankets. The department has 
been obliged throughout the war to use a considerable proportion of 
army blankets of foreign manufacture. 

The condition of the property stored at the Schuylkill Arsenal at 
Philadelphia is a source of apprehension. About 120,000,000 of prop- 
erty are in store there, and it is i*ecommended that alterations and 
additions be made in the buildings, or within the walls, to enable the 
department to remove much valuable property now stored in tempo- 
rary sheds and exposed to danger from fire into proper fireproof 
buildings. 

The prices of clothing and equipage have constantly advanced dur- 
ing the war. A table of the lowest and highest prices paid accom- 
panies this report. It will be seen that toward the termination of the 
war the prices of many important articles had more than doubled; 
of some articles the price has quadrupled. 

The Second Division of this office has charge of the provision and 
distribution of clothing and equipage. It has been under the charge 
of Col. A. J. Perry, of the Quartermaster's Department, who has in 
this office had charge of this branch of its business since the com- 
mencement of the war. He is an officer of rare merit, and I have taken 



UNION AUTHORITIES. 225 

occasion heretofore to ask that he receive promotion as a testimony 
that his services have been recognized and appreciated by his country 
as they are by the chief of this department. 

Although in the active operations of the past four years, and espe- 
cially during the unprecedented movements of the last year, very 
heavy demands have been made upon this branch of the department, 
it has been able to place the material needed at the right places and 
at the right moment. 

During the last year large armies have changed their bases. The 
army of General Sherman from the Tennessee and Ohio to the Atlan- 
tic Coast at Savannah; then again to the harbor of Beaufort, N. C, 
seversd hundred miles distant. Yet at each of these new bases this 
army, from 70, 000 to 100,000 strong, found the supplies for a complete 
new outfit ready for issue. Most of the clothing and equipage for 
this purpose was sent from New York. Details of the operation are 
found elsewhere in this report. 

So armies of 15,000 to 25,000 men have been during the past year 
suddenly moved from the Tennessee to the Atlantic; from the Ten- 
nessee to the Crulf Coast; from the James to the Rio Grande ; but from 
none of these new fields and bases of operation, in the midst of these 
sudden and gigantic movements, has the complaint been made of 
suffering for want of any of the supplies which it is the duty of this 
department to provide or to transport. 

OCEAN TRANSPORTATION. 

Col. George D. Wise, in charge of the Third Division of this office, 
reports that during the first month of the fiscal year the office work 
of the division — t£[it of ocean and lake transportation — ^was embar- 
rassed by the absence of most of the clerks and officers, who were 
called to active service in the field during the demonstration and 
attack on the capital by the rebel army under Early and Breckinridge. 
During this time, however, the necessary steamer transportation was 
assembled at City Point and moved to Washington and Baltimore the 
Sixth Army Corps in time to meet the advancing enem3'at the battles 
of the Monocacy and the attack on Washington. The Nineteenth 
Army Corps was also brought from the Chesapeake, where it was 
arriving by sea from New Orleans, and reached Washington in tim» 
to take part in the operations for its defense and in the pursuit of the 
baffled enemy. 

During the month of July, also, the army of Major-General Canby 
was moved by sea from New Orleans to Mobile Bay, co-operating with 
the navy in the reduction of the fortifications at its entrance. 

From August to December no great movements of troops by sea 
were made, but a large fleet was constantly employed in supplying 
the armies before Richmond and the troops at the various stations 
along the coast from the Chesapeake to New Orleans. 

In the inclement month of December the approach of General Sher- 
man's army to the coast required a large fleet to be employed in readi- 
ness to supply and reflt that army after its long march from Atlanta. 

Transports were disi>atched to Pensacola with supplies to await the 
arrival of the troops, should unexpected opposition compel General 
Sherman to change his course to the south. 

The greater part of the stores intended for his use, however, were 
sent direct to Port Royal Harbor, there to await his arrival at some 
point on the coast of the Caroliuas or Georgia. 

15 R R — SERIES in, VOL V 



226 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. 

When he appeared in rear of Savannah, and capturing Fort McAl- 
lister by a cotup de mairiy communicated with the naval squadron, the 
transports were sent round to the mouths of the Ogeechee and Savan- 
nah Rivers, and light-draft steamers, fitted for river and bay service, 
which had been dispatched upon the first news of his approach, 
arrived in time to transfer to the river landings the clothing, camp 
and garrison equipage, quartermaster's stores, and forage and pro- 
visions which had been of necessity sent in seagoing vessels, both 
sail and steam, and which were of too heavy draft to enter the Ogee- 
chee or pass through the opening first made in the artificial obstruc- 
tions of the Savannah. 

The army was quickly reclothed, reshod, and refitted; its wagons 
filled with rations and forage. 

A large portion of the anny was transferred by steamers from the 
Savannah to Beaufort, S. C, or Port Royal Harbor, at which place 
the vessels of heavy draft could land their sliores without the labor of 
transshipment. 

After a short and much-needed rest, the army, re-equipi)ed, left the 
coast, and the transports and fleet of light-draft steamers repaired to 
the harbor of Morehead City, where they awaited the arrival of the 
troops, who, after a march of 500 miles through a hostile country, 
withoiit communication with their base of supplies, depending solely 
upon the stores in their wagons and the resources of the enemy's 
country for their subsistence, were ceitain to arrive in a condition to 
require an entire renewal of their clothing and shoes and a new 
supply of provisions. 

When I parted with General Sherman at Savannah on the 19th of 
January he told me to look out for him at Kinston, and also to be 
prepared for him lower down the coast should the rebel Army of Vir- 
ginia, abandoning Richmond, unite with the troops in the Carolinas 
and succeed in preventing his passage of the Santee. 

During the month of December, also, an expedition was embarked 
at City Point and Fortress Monroe,* which made an unsuccessful 
attempt, in co-operation with the navy, upon Fort Fisher, at the mouth 
of Cape Fear River. The troops failing to attack were re-embarked 
and returned to Hampton Roads. The transportation by sea, the 
landing and return, were successfully performed. 

In January the expedition was re-embarked with a larger force and 
successfully landed above Fort Fisher, which place, with the aid of a 
naval bombardment unexampled in severity, they carried by assault. 

The troops of the Twenty-third Army Corps, under General Scho- 
field, having borne their part in the campaign in Georgia and Tennes- 
see, after the battle of Nashville, which took place on the 16th and 
16th of December, and the termination of the pursuit of the rebel 
army on tlie Tennessee, were moved by rail and river to Washington 
and Baltimore, where, amid many difficulties from the severity of the 
season, ice entirely suspending for a time the navigation of the Poto- 
mac, they were embarked on ocean steamers and dispatched to the 
Cape Fear River and to Beaufort, N. C, to move, in co-operation with 
the victors of Fort Fisher, upon Wilmington and Kinston, N. C. 

In anticipation of the arrival of General Sherman's army, I had 
ordered to Savannah a portion of the Military Railroad Construction 
Corps. Two divisions of the corps, as organized, with tools and mate- 
rials and officers, were brought from Nashville to Baltimore by rail- 
road. At Baltimore they were re-enforced and embarked on ocean 
steamers and were promptly at the rendezvous. 



UNION AUTHORITIES. 227 

As the army moved, however, without depending npon railroad 
communication, destroying instead of repairing railroads in its 
march, the Construction Corps was transferred to Wilmington and 
Beaufort Harbor, and the railroads which, starting from Wilmington 
and Morehead City, meet at Goldsborough were repaired and stocked 
with engines and cars, either captured or sent from the North. 

Two hundred miles of railrcMul were thus repaired and stocked 
under the protection of the troops of Grenerals Schofield and Terry; 
and when, after the battle of Bentonville, the Right Wing of General 
Sherman's army, under Howard, marched into Goldsborough, on the 
22d of March, ragged from their struggles with the thickets and 
swamps, and blackened by the smoke of the burning forests of Caro- 
lina, they met these railroad trains from the Atlantic loaded with 
three days' rations for their immediate wants. I met. General Sher- 
man at Morehead City on the 25th of March, when he advised me that 
he desired to move again on the 10th of April. 

This army of nearly 100,000 men needed to be entirely reclad and 
reshod; the troops were to be fed while resting, for as soon as the 
army ceased its march it ceased to supply itself by foraging, and 
depended upon the supplies from the coast. Nevertheless, on the 
7th of April I was able to inform General Sherman that the necessary 
supplies were in his camps. 

Every soldier had received a complete outfit of clothing and had 
been newly shod. The wagons were loaded with rations and forage, 
and each of the 3,000 wagons, whose canvas covers had been torn on 
the march from Chattanooga, was supplied with a new cover. The 
army moved on the appointed day against the enemy, interposing 
between it and the Army of the Potomac, then holding the principal 
rebel army fast behind the lines of Richmond. 

A tug-boat of this department, under the command of Captain 
Ainsworth, had reached FayetteviUe by the Capo Fear River on the 
12th of March, and first bore greeting to the Army of the West from 
their comrades whom they had left on the banks of the Tennessee, 
and who, joined with others of the Army of the Potomac, were then 
forcing a communication with them from the new base which they 
sought on the Atlantic Coast. 

l^e demands upon the department at this time compelled it to 
take into its service not only the fieet which it had gradually acquired 
by purchase, but nearly every new steam vessel that had been built 
in the United States to navigate the ocean. 

A fleet of powerful propellers, vessels of 900 to 1,100 tons, swift 
and staunch, burning twelve to sixteen tons of coal per day, w^ith a 
speed of eight to ten knots, had been created during the war, and 
nearly the whole of them were at this time in the service of the 
department. 

Large sailing ships were also employed, loaded with forage and sub- 
sistence, and compelled to anchor on the exposed coast of Carolina, 
where they rode out the winter storms. 

A large quantity of railroad engines and cars were shipped to 
Beaufort Harbor for the railroads in North Carolina, most of which 
were on the termination of hostilities sent to the James River to be 
sold. 

To aid in the rapid supply of General Sherman wh>le at Golds- 
borough and relieve the railroad, and also to enable the department 
to supply him at Winton by the shallow waters of North Carolina in 
his northern inarch, a large number of canal-boats and barges was 



228 COBREBPONDENCE, ETC. 

sent to New Berne. Some of them were used in the Trent River carry- 
ing supplies to Kinston bridge, but the greater part of them were 
released from service by the surrender of the rebel armies and have 
been returned to the Chesapeake and to their owners or sold. 

In all the active movements by sea during the fiscal year, employ- 
ing a fleet in which nearly all the seagoing steamers of the country 
have been employed, but three vessel^ have been lost while in the 
service of this department. 

The North America, a chartered side-wheel steamer of the first 
class, perfectly new, went down in a gale off Cape Hatteras, the Gen- 
eral Lyon was burned, and the Admiral Du Pont was run down at sea. 

After the surrender of the rebel armies orders were given to dis- 
charge all the chartered steamers and to sell those which were the 
property of the department as fast as they could be spared. Very 
heavy movements, however, ordered before much progress in the 
reduction was made, have delayed the discharge and sale of some of 
the transports. 

In Maj' the Twenty-fifth Army Corps was ordered from City Point 
to Texas. The corps numbered about 25,000 men, with artillery and 
baggage. Its guns, ambulances, wagons, and harness, subsistence 
and ammunition, went with it. About 2,000 horses, and mules also 
accompanied it. The greater part of its artillery, cavalry, and team 
horses were left behind. This movement required a fleet of fifty-seven 
ocean steamers, one of which made two voyages. The entire tonnage 
of the fleet was 56,987 tons. The vessels were all provided for a 
twelve-days' voyage, consuming 947 tons of coal and 50,000 gallons 
of water daily. The daily expense of this fleet amounted to $33,311. 
The vessels were fitted with bunks for the troops, and with stalls for 
2,139 horses and mules, which formed part of the expedition. The 
vessels were all rigidly inspected before sailing, and all reached their 
destination in safety. No accident to any of them has been reported. 
A list of the vessels accompanies this report. 

While this expedition of 25,000 troops was afloat another, of 7,000 
troops, was sent by sea from Washington to Savannah, and 3,000 
rebel prisoners were sent from Point Lookout, on the Chesapeake, to 
Mobile. Besides this large numbers of convalescent and discharged 
men were then returning from the Southern ports, and recruits were 
forwarded to the regiments on the coast. 

There were, therefore, more than 30,000 troops and prisoners afloat 
upon the ocean in steam transports at the same time. 

The last annual report of this department gives information as to 
the army transport fleet owned and employed on the 15th of October, 
1864. 

This list omitted to give the names of the Western river st-eamers, 
of which the department then owned a large number. 

There were in the employment of the department of ocean and lake 
transportation, in the spring of 1865, owned by the department — 
steamers, 106; steam-tugs, 29; sailing vessels, 15; barges, 21; total, 
171 vessels, with a tonnage of 49,358 tons. The department also had 
under charter at that time — steamers, 275; tugs, 91; sailing vessels, 
75; barges, 171; w^ith a tonnage of 191,149 tons. 

Total number of vessels employed, 783; tonnage, 240,507 tons. 
Average daily expense of this fleet, $97,500. 

On the Ist of July, 1865, the fleet owned consisted of — steamers, 
115; tugs, 23; sail- vessels, 12; barges, 20; tonnage, 55,496 tons. 



UNION AUTHOBITIBS. 229 

The chartered fleet consisted of — steamers, 177; tugs, 69; sail- 
vessels, 74; barges, 100; tonnage, 138,440 tons. 

Total number of vessels, 590; tonnage, 193,936 tons; daily cost, 
$82,400. 

During the fiscal year the average size of the transport fleet 



StMinera .... 
Hteam-tegs-. 
Soil-TeMttU.. 
BargM 

Total.. 



851 
111 
89 
168 



171,061 
13,2a 
17,rj8 
22,003 



719 



224,984 



Its average daily cost was $92,414. 

The report of Colonel Wise, who is in charge of this branch of the 
Qnartermaster-Generars Office, contains some important observations 
upon the Construction and management of steam ocean transports. 

At the beginning of the war the department was Imposed upon. 
Officers and agents had little experience, and inferior vessels were 
sometimes chartered, and excessive prices were paid for steamers 
chartered from the regular trade, not then entirely and hopelessly 
broken up by the war. 

Stringent measures of reform were adopt>ed ; a scale of prices for the 
different classes of vessels was fixed by the order of the Quarter- 
master-General. The examination and audit of all accounts for 
charter of vessels was brought to this office. All charters contained 
provisions to enable the United States to purchase the vessels at a 
reasonable price, provided that should prove advantageous, and 
system, order, and regularity were introduced into the service. 

This branch of the service, on the reorganization of this office under 
the law of the 4th of July, 1864, was assigned to the Third Division 
of the office, under the direction of Col. G. D. Wise. The safety^ 
efficiency, dispatch, and punctuality with which its affairs liave been 
conducted do him high honor. 

At one time 40,000 men have been afloat. The fleet has averaged 
719 vessels of all classes, with a burden of 225,000 tons. But three 
vessels have been lost during the year, though the greatest and most 
important movements were made during the inclement months of the 
winter — from January to May. 

Very full tables which accompany this report give details in refer- 
ence to the transport fleet and the operations of the department upon 
the ocean and upon the waters of the coast. 

RAIL AND RIVER TRANSPORTATION. 

The service of 'transportation upon the Western rivera has been 
under the direction of the Fourth Division of this office. 

Col. L. B. Parsons, who had been placed in charge of the Western 
river transportation in 1863, just before the preparations for the cam- 
paign of Atlanta commenced, was upon the organization of the 
division of rail and river transportation in this office called to its 
head. He has conducted the service with great efficiency, and econ- 
omy. Of some of the more important movements his report gives 



280 CORRBSPONDBNCB, ETC. 

detaib. When he took charge of this service the Mississippi had 
been opened and the merchants of the West were in condition to 
establish lines of steamers to all parts of its navigable waters. The 
S3rstem of time-charter of steamers was as fast as possible abandoned, 
and contracts were made on public advertisement with the lowest 
responsible bidders to move the stores of the department at fixed 
rates per pound. The rapid accumulation at Na6hville and at other 
points of supplies, which enabled General Sherman to move success- 
fully into Georgia, have been detailed in the last annual report of 
this office. 

WESTERN RIVER TRANSPORTATION. 

In the course of the war a considerable fleet of river steamers and 
other vessels had become the property of the department upon the 
Mississippi and its tributaries, by purchase, by construction, or by 
capture. A list of the steamers accompanies the report. It contains 
the names of — 

Side-wheel steamers 84 

Stem-wheel steamers •. 87 

Center-wheel steamers 8 

Perry-boats 1 

Screw-togs 16 

Total steam-boats 91 

Of other vessels the department owned upon those rivers — 

Steam-boat htOls 2 

Model barges '. _ . 74 

Gmiwale barges 226 

Small wood barges 26 

Box barges : 3 

•^ ( not classified 23 



Total barges 352 

Wharf-boats '. 18 

Canal-boats : 3 

Coal-boats 60 

Yawl-boats i 56 

Sail-boats 1 

MetaUic boats 1 

Total boats 189 

Skiffs 9 

Sectional docks 3 

Smallflats 2 

Floatingdocks 1 

Total boats and barg^ of all kinds 509 

Nearly all of these have been advertised for sale. Those which 
have been constructed or purchased by the department have been or 
will be sold. Those which have been captured or seized will be 
turned over to the Treasury Department, to be disposed of under the 
law, or will be returned to their original owners, if pardoned, and, if 
so ordered, upon full consideration of their claims. 

RAILROAD TRANSPORTATION. 

The agreement made early in the war with a convention of railroad 
companies has continued in force through all the changes in values 
which the war has brought. The railroad officers have responded to 



UNION AUTHORITIES. 281 

every demand of the transportation department of the Government, 
and by their cordial co-oi>eration with the officers of the Quartermas- 
ter's Department have made these great movements of troops easy of 
execution and unexampled in dispatch. 

To Brig. Gen. L. B. Parsons, who has been in charge of the Fourth 
Division of this office, and to Bvt. Col. Alexander Bliss, his assistant, 
and frequently, in his absence, in charge of the office, and the officers 
at the various posts and depots, charg^ with the duty of transporta- 
tion, great credit is due for the safety, order, and speed with which 
this immense business has been conducted. 

There have been filed in the office of the Fourth Division since its 
organization 442 claims, amounting to $268,545.02; 202 have been 
allowed, amounting to $68,712.34; 92 have been referred to the Third 
Auditor or to disbursing officers for examination and settlement, 
amounting to $87,462.30; 99 have been rejected, amounting to 
$60,138.34; 48 await action, amounting to $16,891.04; 1 has been 
withdrawn, amounting to $5,341. 

From the imperfect reports yet received at the office of the Fourth 
Division the number of passages granted to prisoners and refugees 
who have been transported by the division during the fiscal year is 
356,541, costing over $1,300,000. 

General Schofield's movement from Clifton, on the Tennessee, by 
the Tennessee River, the Ohio, and the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, 
to the Potomac, and thence to the coast of North Carolina, was accom- 
plished in the midst of a very severe winter, during which the navi- 
gation of the Ohio and the Potomac was at times interrupted by ice. 
Within five days after the movement was decided on in Washington 
the troops upon the Tennessee, nearly 1,400 miles distant, were 
embarking. The movement to Washington occupied an average time 
of only eleven days. It took place during the month of January. 

The special report of Colonel Parsons, of the Quartermaster's Depart- 
ment, who was dispatched by the War Department to attend to it 
personally, accompanies this report; it is an interesting detail of 
the difficulties overcome, and of the success with which they were 
surmounted. 

On the conclusion of the campaign in Tennessee, while the Twenty- 
third Corps, under General Schofield, was ordered across the Allegha- 
ni«3, by Washington, to the coast of North Carolina, to co-operate 
with C^eneral Sherman, the Sixteenth Corps, under Maj. Gen. A. J. 
Smith, was ordered to New Orleans to co-operate with General Canby 
in the reduction of Mobile. A fieet of forty steamers was promptly 
assembled at Eastport, on the Tennessee, below the Muscle Shoals. 
The entire command, including a brigade of artillery and the Seventh 
Division of the Cavalry Corps, was embarked on the fieet. It consisted 
of 17,314 men, 1,038 horses, 2,371 mules, 351 wagons, 83 ambulances. 
The embarkation began on the 5th of February, 1865, and was com- 
pleted on the 8th. The fieet sailed on the 9th, and the command 
arrived at New Orleans on the 23d, having been moved in thirteen 
days 1,330 miles. 

DISPERSION OF THE ARMIES CONCENTRATED AT WASHINGTON. 

The armies of the West and of the Potomac, after the fall of Rich- 
mond and the surrender of the eastern rebel armies, marched through 
Washington, were reviewed by the President and Cabinet, and 
encamping upon the heights surrounding the capital, prepared for 
their final dispersion and disbandment. 



232 COBRE8PONDENCE, ETC. 

Daring the forty days between the 27th of May and the 6th of July 
233,200 men, 12,838 horses, and 4,300,850 pounds of baggage were 
moved from Washington by the Washington Branch Railroad to the 
Relay House, where a large portion of them turned westward. The 
i-emainder passed through Baltimore, dividing at that city into two 
streams, one of which moved north through Harrisburg, the other 
northeast through Philadelphia. 

The general instructions of the Quartermaster-General, preparing 
for this movement, will be found among the papers attached to this 
report. They designate the routes and prescribe certain precautions 
and preparations for the comfort and safety of the troops moving by 
rail. 

Of the troops there were returning home for discharge from service 
161,403 men, with 4,630 horses, and 1,828,450 pounds baggage, dis- 
tributed as follows: 

To the Northeastern States, 28,803 men, 1,307 horses, 287,000 pounds 
baggage. 

To the Middle States, 100,309 men, 2,323 horses, 907,000 pounds 
baggage. 

To the Western States, 32,291 men, 1,000 horses, 634,450 pounds 
baggage. 

The Army of the Tennessee, ordered to move to Louisville, from 
which place they were, in a few weeks, sent to their homes for dis- 
charge from service, 60,904 men, 2,657 horses, 2,424,000 pounds 
baggage. 

Cavalry ordered West for active service, 10,893 men, 5,757 horses, 
308,000 pounds baggage. 

Total number in forty days, over the Washington Branch Railroad 
and the various railroads diverging from the Relay House and from 
Baltimore, 233,200 men, 12,838 horses, and 4,300,850 pounds baggage. 

The Army of the Tennessee, the troops ordered West for active 
service, and a portion of those ordered to their Western homes for 
discharge, passed over the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad to Parkers- 
burg, its western terminus, on the Ohio River, where boats were pro- 
vided for their march to Louisville, Lawrenceburg, Camp Dennison, 
and Cincinnati. Between May 27 and July 6, within forty days, dur- 
ing twelve of which no troops arrived at Parkersburg from Washing- 
ton, there were moved from that place : 





To— 


Men. 


HoraM. 


LoniBTiUe 


78.450 
7,082 
8,424 
1.479 
1.861 


5.855 


Saint Lonis 


8,314 
153 




Camp DenniaoD, Ohio 


29 


ClneiDDftti - 


545 








Total 


96.796 


9 896 







In this movement by water ninety-two steam-boats were employed 
an average of seventeen days and a fraction for each boat, at an aver- 
age compensation of $175 per day each. Each boat consumed on an 
average 200 bushels of coal per day. 

The total service of all the boats was 1,601 days, costing for charter 
$280,175, and consuming 320,200 bushels of bituminous coal, $48,030. 

Total cost of transportation from Parkersburg by water to various 
points on the Ohio and to Saint Louis of 96,796 men and 9,896 horses, 
$328,205. 



UNION AUTHORITIES. 233 

The same movement if performed by railroad, at the reduced rates 
at which the railroads serve the Government, would have cost $746,964. 

Thus 96,000 men and 10,000 horses were, in the short space of forty 
days, moved from Washington, on the Potomac, across the Alleghanies 
and, descending the Ohio and ascending the Mississippi, were placed 
in the several positions to which they had been ordered. 

During these same forty days 233,000 men in all were moved by 
railroad from Washington, 96,000 of them to the posts above named; 
the others were distributed to every hamlet and village of the States 
north of the Potomac and Ohio Rivers, and restored to their homes, 
the labor of war over, to return to the pursuits of peaceful industry 
which they had left at the call of their country in her hour of need. 

In all these movements there have been few accidents, and the 
safety and economy of the service are not less noticeable than its 
speed. 

Had the armies marched to their several places of destination the 
pay of the men, the subsistence of men and animals, the maintenance 
of the immense trains which would have accompanied them, consider- 
ing the time which the march would have consumed, would have far 
exceeded the cost of this rapid movement by rail and river. 

It is understood that since the close of the war 800,000 men have 
been safely brought back from the rebellious districts, transported by 
this depaii^ment to the several camps of discharge established in every 
loyal State, and finally sent to their homes.* Many of these men came 
from Texas and the Gulf Coast; others from the territories of all the 
lately rebellious States. 

Such a movement is unexampled. It illustrates the resources of 
the countiy for the oi)erations of war, and the great advantages it 
possesses in its system of navigable rivers and its 40,000 miles of 
railroads. 

MILITARY RAILROADS. 

In the winter of 1863, when the rebel armies were driven back from 
Chattanooga, the immediate repair and almost total i*econstruction of 
the track of the railway from Nashville to Chattanooga became an 
imperative necessity. 

The i)ositions taken up by the trooi)s along the line of the Tennes- 
see River, for the winter, required for their supply that the railroads 
from Nashville to Decatur, and from Decatur to beyond Knoxville, 
should also be repaired and equipped. Bridges were rebuilt; new 
and heavier iron was laid down upon the road from Nashville to 
Chattanooga; locomotives and cars in gi*eat numbers were manufac- 
tured at the North and transported to the scene of active operations. 

As the Louisville and Nashville Railroad proved insufficient for the 
heavy traffic thrown upon it, and was sometimes cut by guerrillas, the 
Nashville and Northwestern Railroad, from NashvUle to Johnson ville, 
on the Tennessee River, was repaired, completed, and opened to trade. 
This afforded a new avenue by which the products of the Northwest 
were transported to the base of operations at Nashville, the Tennes- 
see River being navigable for light-draft boats from the Ohio to 
Johnsonville. 

Seventeen hundred and sixty-nine miles of military railways were 
at one time rei)aired, maintained, stocked, and operated by the agents 
of this department, under the energetic supervision of Bvt. Brig. Gen. 
D. C. McCallum, general manager of military railways of the United 
States. 



284 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. 

In the repair of so many miles of railway great quantities of iron, 
burned and twisted by the contending forces, both of which, on occa- 
sion, destroyed raibx)ad8 which they were obliged to abandon, came 
into our possession. 

To make this iron serviceable in the repair of the railroads toward 
Atlanta and to the Gulf, should the same stubborn resistance be offered 
beyond Atlanta as was met with on the advance to that place, I directed 
the completion of an unfinished rolling-mill captured at Chattanooga. 

For local military reasons Major-General Thomas required that the 
mill should be constructed within the intrenchment of the city of Chat- 
tanooga, instead of on the foundations of the mill, some two miles 
from that town. A rolling-mill capable of rerolling fifty tons of rail- 
road iron per day was constructed and put in operation. It Utilized 
a large quantity of iron taken from the lines of Southern railroads, 
and was of important aid in restoring the railroad communication 
between Chattanooga and Atlanta, broken up by order of Greneral 
Sherman when, in the fall of 1864, he destroyed the latter city and 
set forth on his adventurous march to the sea. 

The termination of the war having relieved the War Department 
of the duty of repairs and reconstruction of railroads, this rolling- 
mill was advertised and sold at a satisfactory price. It will be of 
great advantage to the Southwestern railroads, on all of which the 
iron is much worn by constant use during the war, with little means 
of renewal. 

Most of their iron will require rerolling, and this mill is now in full 
operation upon the work. 

General McCallum reports 1,769 miles of railroad as operated dur- 
ing the fiscal year, with an equipment of 365 engines and 4,203 cars 
either in use or in reserve, and an expenditure of $22,000,000. His 
report is among the papers submitted herewith. 

The force employed in the repair, construction, and operation of 
the military railways has been very large. A table herewith shows 
the strength at several different periods. In April, 1865, the number 
employed in this branch of the service was 23,533. 

TRANSFER OF MILITARY RAILROADS. 

As soon as the surrender of the rebel armies and the cessation of 
hostilities made it possible, efforts were made to induce the railroad 
companies of the rebellious territories to reoi^anize by the election of 
loyal directors and managers, and to resume the charge of the lines 
which had fallen into the hands of this department and been repaired 
and used for the supply of our armies. 

At this date nearly all the roads have been transferred, either to the 
presidents and directors or to boards of public works of the States in 
which they are situated. In the Atlantic States the policy pursued 
has been to deliver up the roads in whatever condition they were left 
by the fortune of war at the moment of transfer. 

Questions of ownership, claims to material of the road tracks trans- 
ferred either by rebel or by U. S. authority from one road to another, 
are left for decision of the courts. The United States merely retires, 
leaving the lawful owners to resume their property. Such material 
as had been collected for repair or construction and not used, and 
such as was in depot, has been sold to the companies at a fair valua- 
tion, and upon credit of greater or less extent, as circumstances 
seemed to require. 



XmiON AUTHOBITIEB. 235 

The department does not propose to charge the railroads for expend!- 
tares or repairs, or for materials actually used on the roads; nor 
does it propose to allow any charge against it for the use and profits 
of the roads while occupied as military routes, nor for damages done 
by its troops or agents under the pressure of military operations. 

A railroad is an engine of war more powerful than a battery of 
artillery, subject to capture and to use; and there is, it would seem, 
as little reason for paying damages or rent for its occupation and use 
as there would be for a captured battery. 

The rolling-stock and movable machinery have been hired to the 
railroads desiring their use until arrangements could be made for a 
sale. Most of that collected in the Atlantic States has at this date 
been disposed of at public auction, either for cash or in payment of 
debts for transportation due by the department to railroads. 

In the Southwest the rolling-stock belonging to the United States, 
some 220 engines and 3,000 cars, was all of the wide gauge, fitted for 
the Southern roads. It could not be used without expensive altera- 
tions upon the Northern railroads, and these could not be expected, 
therefore, to purchase it at prices approaching its value. 

The railroads and the territory of the Southwest were too much 
impoverished by the events of the unsuccessful rebellion to be able 
to purchase for cash the rolling-stock and machinery which had cost 
this department several millions of dollars. 

The reconstruction of the Southwestern railroads and their oper- 
ation were of the greatest importance to the pacification, restoration, 
and prosperity of the country, and on the 8th of August an Executive 
order was issued prescribing the terms upon which these railroads 
should be restored to their lawful owners. 

Difficulties having arisen in carrying this into full effect, additional 
orders were issued on the 14th of October, 1865. 

Under these orders the railroads and the railroad property of the 
department in the Southwest are being disposed of. Copies of the 
orders, as published by this department for the information and guid- 
ance of its officers, accompany this report; they are General Orders 
of the War Department, No. 276, 1863, and Quartermaster-Generars 
Office^ Nos. 56 and 62, 1865. 

This branch of the service has been a very costly one, but its expendi- 
tures have accomplished their objects. They have supplied our armies, 
and have enabled them to move and accomplish in weeks what with- 
out them would have required years, or would have been impossible. 

Of the skill and ability of General D. C. McOallum, director and 
general manager of the U. S. Military Railroads, and of the able body 
of engineers, superintendents, and assistants, who have enabled the 
department to repair, to build, and to manage the railroads during 
these great operations, it is impossible to speak too highly. 

The commanding generals of armies as well as the Quartermaster- 
General recognize their courage and devotion, their services, and their 
merits. 

TELEGRAPH. 

The Military Telegraph has continued to be a most important instru- 
ment in the conduct of military operations. Its officers^ have shown 
the same fidelity and devotion as in former years. 

Col. Anson Stager has been chief of the Military Telegraph, and 
Maj. Thomas T. Eckert, assistant quartermaster, has been assistant 



236 COBBE8PONDBNCE, ETC. 

saperintendent, on daty at the War Department, and in charge of all 
telegraph lines in the Departments of the Potomac, Virginia, North 
Carolina, and the Sonth. 

The f nnds for the support of the Military Telegraph are famished 
from the appropriations of the Quartermaster's Department, and are 
disbursed under the direction of the chief of Military Telegraphs, 
whose reports, with those of his assistants, are submitted herewith. 

The duties of these officers have brought them more directly under 
the notice of the Secretary of War than of the Quartermaster-Oeneral, 
and their merits are well known to the War Department. 

Expenditures during the year were $300,000 for material and sup- 
plies, of which about $130,000 was expended for purchase of 285 miles 
of submarine telegraph cable for use in case of necessity upon the 
coast and bays. The greater part of this is still on hand. 

Referring to Colonel Stager's report, herewith, it appears that the 
estimated cost of supplying and maintaining and operating military 
lines now in use is $75,000 per month: 



Military telegraph i& operation July 1, 1864 

Couatrncted diuing the yeer 

Total in operation daring the flacal year ending Jane 80, 1885.. 
Taken down or abandoned daring the year 

Total In operation June 80, 1866 



Land. 



4.M6i 



8.2011 
2,048 



fi>lfi2| 



Sab- 
marine. 



JTiiM. 



1214 



754 



Aggro 
gate. 



JTilw. 

8.3S3i 
0,228 



During the rebellion there have been constructed and operated 
about 15,000 miles of military telegraph. 

The cost of the Military Telegraph from May 1, 1861, to December 
1, 1862, was about $22,000 per month. 

During the year 1863 it averaged $38,500 per month. 

In 1864 the telegraph was greatly extended, and the cost reached 
$93,500 per month. 

The total expenditure during the year ending June 30, 1865, has 
been $1,360,000. 

The total expenditure from May 1, 1861, to June 30, 1865, $2,655,500. 

Upon the fall of the rebellion the telegraph lines throughout the 
South were taken possession of by the Government. The telegraph 
companies were called upon to repair their lines and put them in 
good working order, furnishing all labor and material therefor, the 
United States to be at no outlay beyond the expense of maintaining 
purely military lines and military stations. An account of Govern- 
ment business is kept, subject to future consideration or settlement. 

FOBAQB, FUEL, AND REQUIiAR SUPPLIES. 

From the records in this office it appears that the armies in the 
field required, under the organization prevailing during the third 
year of the war, for the use of cavalry, artillery, and for the trains, 
one-half as many horses and mules as they contained soldiers. 

The full ration of forage for a horse is fourteen pounds of hay and 
twelve pounds of grain daily, twenty-six pounds in all. The gross 
weight of a man's ration of subsistence is three pounds; the forage 
for an army therefore weighs, when full rations are supplied, about 



UKION AUTHORITIES. 237 

four and a half times as much as the subsistence stores. The forage, 
probably, exceeds the subsistence as much in bulk as in weight. 

With armies marching in the field, the forage is in great part gath- 
ered along the line of march. 

Thus the* army of General Sherman, on its march through the 
Southern States, supplied itself with abundant forage. The moment 
that the army halted, as at Savannah and at Gk)]dsborough, large 
shipments of grain and hay were necessary to keep the animals alive. 

So the army which ox)erated in the vicinity of Nashville, and Gen- 
eral Sherman's aimy during its slow progress from Nashville [Chat- 
tanooga?] to Atlanta, and during the siege of that city, drew immense 
quantities of grain and hay from the Ohio River at vast expense. 

The armies operating against Richmond during the past fiscal year 
occupied a fixed position in the lines of their fortified camps, and 
drew all their supplies from the North by sea. 

The animals of the Army have been well supplied throughout the 
year, notwithstanding the extent of the territory over which they have 
been scattered, and the sudden and great changes of base, and con- 
sequently of lines of supply. 

When General Sherman's army reached Savannah, and before the 
opening of the obstructed channels leading to that city permitted the 
approach of the fleet which had been dispatched to Port Royal, laden 
with forage and other stores, there was for a short time a scarcity of 
forage. The rice straw and rice which alone the country about 
Savannah furnished were soon consumed, and I am informed that 
some artillery horses perished. But the opening of the river soon 
enabled the department to deliver ample supplies, and his army 
moved north with abundance of animals and of food. 

Col. S. L. Brown was placed in charge of the purchase and supply 
of forage to the armies on the Atlantic Coast in December, 1863, and 
upon the organization of the Fifth Division of this of^ce was trans- 
ferred to its head. His administration has been successful, and his 
reports record a business of magnitude and importance seldom 
equaled. Between the 8th of December, 1862, and the 30th of June, 
1865, he purchased and shipped to the depots and armies 2,787,758 
bushels of com, 20,997,289 bushels of oats, 43,311 bushels of barley, 
269,814 tons of hay, 8.243 tons of straw; the cost of which was 
$31,308,563.98. The grain was purchased at certain points, under the 
direction of Colonel Brown, and transported to Portland, Boston, 
New York, and Philadelphia by rail, canal, river, and lake, making 
8,567 car-loads, 560 barge-loads by canal, and 49 schooner, 29 bark, 
and 20 propeller cargoes on the lakes. The hay, purchased upon the 
line of railroad, was transported to the coast in 5,555 car-loads. The 
whole was reshipped from the above-named ports to the depots of the 
armies on the coast in 2,570 cargoes. The freight paid to these ves- 
sels was $2,576,152.14. 

Daily reports' from the depots of the various armies, when daily 
mail or telegraphic communication was open, have been required, 
and have kept this office advised of the state of supply. Contracts 
made at a distance have been subjected to a careful examination by 
Colonel Brown himself, and every effort made to correct and prevent 
extravagance and fraud, both in the purchase and consumption of 
forage. 

The loss by wastage, fire, and the perils of the sea upon shipments 
of forage amounting to $25,000,000, has been less than seven-eighths of 
one per cent. — about eighty-three hundredths of one per cent. That 



238 



GOBBEBPONDENCB, ETC. 



there has been waste is undeniable; but in the handling of 30,000,000 
bushels of grain, and its daily distribution to the manger or nose-bag 
of every horse or mule in the public service, over a country of 2,000 
miles in width, this was unavoidable. 

The abstracts with the report of the Fifth Division show, as approxi- 
mate results, that during the fiscal year there have been supplied to 
the Army: 



Articles. 


Qosntity. 


Valoe. 


Com 




bvttaela.. 


5.M2,878 

38,784.880 

48,811 

407, 7M 

10,666 

146 

614 


$8,568,M 

88.794.880 

64,867 

18.048.568 


Oftto 




do 


Barlev 




do.... 


H»y 




, tons.. 


8tiiw 




ilo 


S18,800 
810 


Feed 




do 


Foddor 




do.... 


804 






1 




Forage 




4S, 681. 584 









Fuel for the troops has, generally, in the field, been cut by them- 
selves. At positions held for some time and not in the enemy's terri- 
tory, it is supplied by contract, the labor of troops being employed in 
different degrees, according as the exigencies of military duty, in the 
view of commanding generals, will permit. 

Fuel for steam-vessels is procured by contract, principally at 
Philadelphia and Pittsburg. 

The reports in the Fifth Division show an aggregate of supplies of 
fuel during the fiscal year of — 



Fael. 


Quantity. | 


Value. 


Wood 




cords.. 


336,160 
882.452 


81.680,840 


Coal 




iona. 


8,824.580 





These numbers, however, are imperfect and subject, probably, to 
important increase upon a complete exitmination and analysis of the 
records and reports and accounts of officers. 

The reports from the depot of Washington show the issue during 
the war of— 

Com boBhels.. 4,500,000 

Oats do.-.. 29,000,000 

Hay tonfl.. 400.000 

Straw do 15,000 

Coal do.... 802,000 

Wood cords.. 210,000 

Capt. E. D. Chapman, forage officer at Saint Louis, reports the 
purchase of forage at that depot during the war of— 

Com buflhela.. 8,847,480 

Gate - do.... 17,408,778 

Hay tons.- 218,216 

Straw do.... 8,206 

But I am of opinion that there have been many purchases of which 
Captain Chapman cannot have knowledge, and that the quantity 
actually purchased at that dei>ot is considerably greater than above 
stated. 



UNION AUTHORITIES. 239 

Imx>erfect aniilyses of contracts and reports in this office indicate 
a supply of forage during the war exceeding — 



ArtlclM. 



Quantity. 



Valae. 



Corn bnsheU.. 

OaU do..., 

Haj tout.. 

Sfeimw do..., 

Total mtimatfld ooat of rorace dnring the war, ao far as asoartained 
from raporta analysed in tbla office. 



22,810,271 

78,683,799 

1.518.621 

21.276 



$29,879,814 

78,862,090 

48,096,872 

485.580 



150,90SI.782 



Bat vast quantities of forage were purchased and issued at remote 
or subordinate posts, the accounts of which cannot be made up without 
a complete analysis of the vouchers of disbursing officers. Much was 
purchased or taken on the march by officers subsequently killed or dis- 
abled, or by officers not reporting to this department. For much of 
this memorandum receipts were given; and these are among the 
claims continually reaching this office under the law of July 4, 1864. 

The total quantity of fuel reported as furnished is — 











1 Quantity. 


Valoe. 


Wood 






copde 


551.138 ' 
1.080.910. 


(2, 757. 160 


Coal 






tone.. 


13,777.785 













The wood was generally used near the place of purchase. The coal 
has been transported, at the expense of the department, from the 
market in which it was purchased to all the Atlantic, Gulf, and 
Western river ports between Saint Louis and Pittsburg. 

CLAIMS FOR REGULAR SUPPLIES. 

To the Fifth Division is intrusted the examination of claims for fuel, 
forage, and other regular supplies, irregularly taken by the armies, 
and not accounted for or imperfectly reported by officers of this 
department. Such of these as appear to be just and equitable are 
referred to the Third Auditor of the Treasury, with a recommendation 
for settlement, under the law of July 4, 1864. 

A copy of General Orders, No. 35, which contains the rules for 
examination of these claims, accomx)anies this report. 

These claims are examined as to the actual use of the supplies by 
the Army, as to the past and present loyalty of the claimants and wit- 
nesses, and as to the genuineness of the signatures. Information as 
to loyalty is sought from provost-marshals; and a very large number 
of claims is rejected upon evidence of disloyalty of both claimants 
and witnesses. 

lliere have been received and referred to the Fifth Division, from 
January 1 to October 16, 1865, 4,245 packages, containing 14,455 
claims, vouchers given by officers of the Quartermaster's Department, 
and claims presented under the act of July 4, 1864, and Grcneral 
Orders, No. 35. 

HOSPFTALS AND BARRACKS. 

Daring the fiscal vear hospitals of importance have been erected at Indian- 
apolis, at an estimated coet of $80,000 

AtNewark,N.J 70,000 



240 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. 

Worcester, Maes. , conversioii of the Eclectic College into a hospital $86, 800 

Manchester, K.H SO, 000 

Hicks Hospital, Baltimore 75,000 

Nashville 25,000 

Hilton Head hospital, extended 80,000 

At the commencement of the fiscal year the capacity of the hos- 
pitals of the Army was 120,521 beds. The capacity of the principal 
hospitals erected during the fiscal year is 7,300 beds. 

By the pitching of hospital tents adjacent to the wooden hospitals, 
great additions to their capacity have been made. 

Hospital buildings are erected and hospital tents are furnished by the 
Quartermaster's Department. The hospitals, after being constructed, 
are turned over to the Medical Department, to be administered under 
direction of the Surgeon-General. Repairs and extensions are made 
upon his requisition, approved by the War Department, as they become 
necessary. 

When the hospitals are vacated they are returned to this depart- 
ment, to be sold or otherwise disposed of. 

The hospitals throughout the country (and during the war they 
have been located in almost every State) have been built bj' the 
Quartermaster's Department upon plans generally prepared or sug- 
gested by the Surgeon-General. 

They are temi)orary structures built of wood with a view to econ- 
omy, but from their magnitude some of them have been costly. 

The Mower General Hospital, at Chestnut Hill, Philadelphia, with 
a capacity for nearly 4,000 patients; the hospital at Davids Island 
and that at Willets Point, N. Y. ; the Jarvis and the Patterson Park 
Hospitals, at Baltimore; the general hospital at Jeffersonville, Ind.; 
the several hospitals in the District of Columbia and adjacent thereto; 
the hospitals at Fortress Monroe and at City Point, on the James 
River, and the hospitals at Nashville and at Chattanooga, Tenn., are 
among the largest and most expensive which have been constructed 
by this department. 

The material (wood) used in these hospitals is cheaper than any 
other, cheaper even than tents; but to provide for the cooking, warm- 
ing, ventilating, and purification of such numbers of sick men 
requires at all these great general hospitals very expensive and costly 
arrangements for cooking, for laundries, and for supplying water in 
great abundance. Many of them are heated by steam; some are sup- 
plied with water from the pipes of city water- works, at others special 
provisions have been made for an independent water supply. Most 
of them have steam machinery for washing and for pumping. At 
one of these hospitals the daily consumption of water has exceeded 
100,000 gallons. 

The principal barracks erected duiing the year have been barracks 
for draft rendezvous. 

Spring MillB, near Philadelphia $84,000 

Slocnm, N. Y 25,000 

Johnson's Island, for guard of prisoners of war, Sandusky, Ohio 15, 000 

A depot for prisoners of war was also constructed on Hart's Island, 
N. Y. 

Necessary repairs have been made from time to time upon these 
and upon the numerous other baiTacks scattered throughout the 
country. 

As the reduction of the Army and cessation of enlistments have 
vacated the various barracks, they have been inspected and reported 
to the War Department, most of them with recommendation for sale. 



UNION AUTHORITIES. 241 

Very large numbers of buildings erected as hospitals, store-houses, 
offices, and barracks have already been sold, and others are now being 
advertised for sale. These sales are at public auction to the highest 
bidder. The materials generally bring fair prices, and a considerable 
sum will be realized from this source. 

The Sixth Division of this office, which has charge of hospitals and 
barracks, is also charged with the records and reports of interments. 
Under General Orders, No. 40, of July 3, 1865, which on the conclu- 
sion of the war called upon officers of this department for special 
reports of the number of interments registered during the war, 
reports have been received from officers in seventeen States, including 
the District of Columbia. 

They report the int^^rments registered in their offices at 116,148. Of 
thesethere were— whites, 95,803; colored, 20,345; loyal, 98, 827; disloyal, 
12,596; refugees, 600; contrabands, 4,125. These include few of the 
interments made immediately after battles, which are made by details 
of troops, and are reported by the commanding generals in the lists 
of killed in battle. 

These are the records of those who die in hospitals, camps, and bar- 
racks, for whose burial there is time to make decent and orderly pro- 
vision under the general orders and regulations. They do not include 
the numerous victims of skirmishes and of assassination by bush- 
whackers and robbers under the guise of guerrillas, whose remains 
bleach by the waysides and in the woodland paths of the South. 
They do include, however, the 12,912 victims of the barbarities of 
Andersonville, 6a., and the 1,500 whose graves were marked this 
spring upon the battle-fields of Spotsylvania and the Wilderness. 

The National Soldiers* Cemetery, at Arlington, continues to be used 
for the interment of the victims of the rebellion who die in Washing- 
ton or its vicinity. It contains the remains of 5,291 persons. The 
cemetery at the Military Asylum contains 5,211; Harmony Cemetery, 
388; Battle Cemetery, 40; Alexandria Cemetery, 3,600. These ceme- 
teries have been carefully tended and decorated. A cemetery has 
been constructed, under order of Maj. Gen. G. H. Thomas, at Chatta- 
nooga, within the walls of which it is intended to collect the remains 
of all who fell in battle or died in the hospital in that vicinity. 

Capt. J. M. Moore, assistant quartermaster, was by your order, 
immediately upon the opening of communication, dispatched in a 
steamer loa<ied with materials, with workmen, and clerks to identify 
and mark in a suitable manner the graves of those who died at Ander- 
sonville. With the aid of a detail furnished by Major-General Wilson 
thLs duty was performed. 

The grounds in which 12,012 of our comrades had been buried in 
trenches were inclosed; the bodies where the enrtli had l)een washed 
from them by rains were again covered. Head-boanls, painted white, 
were placed over ejich, bearing the name, rank, regiment, and State, 
with date of death, as ascertained from the captured hospital i-ecords. 

Twelve thousand four hundred and sixty-one were identified, and 
upon 451 graves Captain Moore was compelled to place the inscription 
"Unknown U. S. soldier." His report is herewith. 

The names of those who have been interred in the militaiy ceme- 
teries of the District of Columbia and of Washington have by your 
authority been published in a general order, which has been distrib- 
uted to State authorities, public libraries, and to newspapers which 
publish official advertisements. The list is thus made accessible to 
the friends of those who have fallen. 

16 B R — SERIES III, VOL V 



242 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. 

The lists of interments at Spotsylvania and the Wilderness and of 
those who died at Andersonville are being printed. As other lists are 
received at this office they will be submitted to you for publication. 

It is reported unofficially that several thousand of our dead are 
buried at Florence, S. C, and at other prison camps of the South. 
As soon as arrangements can be made for the purpose proper and 
decent attention will be given to their remains. Orders have been 
given for inspection of the cemeteries of other prison camps and of 
battle-fields. It is hoped that most of them can in time be inclosed 
and preserved. 

SIXTH DIVISION — CLAIMS. 

There have been presented to the Sixth Division 2,479 claims under 
the law of July 4, 1864. The amount claimed was $1,587,181.47. 
Seven hundred and fifty-one of these claims, amounting to $183,452.30, 
have after examination been referred to the Third Auditor, with 
recommendation for settlement under the law; 1,054 have been 
rejected, amounting to $446,163.32. Claims amounting to $957,565.85 
still await examination and final action in this division. 

The Sixth Division has since its organization been under charge of 
Col. J. J. Dana, of the Quartermaster's Department, an officer who 
has in various positions during the war displayed signal intelligence 
and devotion to his duties. As chief of transportation at the great 
depot of Washington, as chief quartermaster of the First Army Corps 
during the campaign of Chancellorsville and Gettysburg, and as assist- 
ant in this office, and after its organization chief of the Sixth Division, 
he has won the approval and esteem of his commanders. 

MILITARY TRAINS. 

The officer in charge of the division of military trains reports from 
the returns of officers of the department, so far as received, that 
during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1864, there were purchased 
14,549 wagons, 1,229 ambulances, 1,279 carts, 58,144 sets wheel har- 
ness, 87,480 sets lead harness, 5,255 sets irregular harness, 335 sets 
artillery harness, 1,702 sets cart harness, 60 traveling and 824 portable 
forges. There were captured from the rebels during the same fiscal 
year 1,541 wagons, 468 ambulances, 245 carts, 6 carriages, 6,661 sets 
wheel harness, 6,906 sets lead harness, 797 sets irregular harness, 119 
sets artillery harness, 406 sets cart harness, 3 traveling and 73 porta- 
ble forges. There were expended, lost, and sold during the year 
2,372 wagons, 277 ambulances, 96 carts, 5 carriages, 17,907 sets wheel 
harness, 16,732 sets lead harness, 3,453 sets irregular harness, 393 sets 
artillery harness, 133 sets cart harness, 3 traveling and 229 portable 
forges. 

During the fiscal year ending June 30, 1865, there were purchased 
4,762 wagons, 1,436 ambulances, 247 carts, 13,215 sets wheel harness, 
18,961 sets lead harness, 2,588 sets irregular harness, 4 sets artillery 
harness, 328 sets cart harness, 34 traveling and 890 portable forges. 
There were manufactured in the repair and other shops of the depart- 
ment 1,443 wagons, 79 carts, 14,152 sets wheel harness, 20, 767 sets lead 
harness, 929 sets irregular harness, 34 sets artillery harness, and 173 
sets cart harness. There were captured 1,599 wagons, 174 ambulances, 
108 carts, 6,228 sets wheel harness, 7,770 sets lead harness, 867 sets 
irregular harness, 65 sets artillery harness, and 46 portable forges. 
There were expended, lost, and sold 2,211 wagons, 679 ambulances, 97 



UNION AUTHORTTIBS. 243 

carts, 18,325 sets wheel harness, 23,254 sets lead harness, 1,583 sets 
irregular harness, 12 travelinf? and 432 portable forges. 

The trains of the Army had been brought to a high state of efficiency 
by the 30th of June, 1864, and they were probably not increased in mag- 
nitude during the year, the purchase and manufacture serving only 
to keep them in a complete and efficient state. Much of the harness 
and many of the wagons having been purchased early in the war, and 
in continual use, are worn and of little value. 

The army of General Shennan and the Army of the Potomac uniting 
at Washington, after four years of active campaign, in which the 
fonner had marched from the Mississippi to the Potomac, brought 
together in the District of Columbia army wagons of the regulation 
pattern which had been used at the first battle of Bull Run on the 
2l8t of July, 1861, some of which had made all the campaigns of each 
army since. 

The baggage wagons and harness, the general equipment of the 
trains of our armies, are probably of models which cannot be improved. 
They have borne the rough usage of war in the hands of men of little 
experience at first, and not willing to take that care of them which 
can be expected from and enforced upon the veteran soldier. 

The experience of this war has convinced all officers of this depart- 
ment that for the army trains mules are much superior to horses, and 
of late the horses have almost entirely disappeared from the trains, 
being transferred to the cavalry or artillery and replaced by mules. 

A copy of Special Orders, No. 44, headquarters Armies of the United 
States, City Point, Va., June 28, 1864, accompanies this report. It 
sets forth in detail and clearly the organization and size of the trains 
of an active army as perfected by four years' exi)erience in the field. 

With this report are several reports from officers of this department 
giving information as to the movement and management of the trains 
of armies in campaigns. This information is seldom available to 
the military student. It is of great value and should be printed for 
reference and use hereafter. 

SEVENTH DIVISION — CLAIMS. 

During the fiscal year ending June 30, 1865, and from the termina- 
tion of that year to October 10, 1865, there were presented and referred 
to the Seventh Division of this office 11,494 claims, amounting to 
t2,316,361.53. Four thousand three hundred and thirty-seven were 
passed, amounting to $1,239,872.23; 5,867 were rejected, amounting 
to $950,455.66; 1,290 remain on file for further action, amounting to 
$126,033.64. 

The Seventh and Ninth Divisions of this office have been in chai'ge 
of Col. B. C. Card, whose intelligent and prompt discharge of the 
duties assigned to him have met my entire approbation. I have named 
him with others to you for the promotion which he richly merits. 

TRANSPORTATION OVER THE PLAINS. 

The troops operating on the great Western plains and in the mount- 
ain regions of New Mexico, Colorado, Utah, and Idaho are supplied 
princii>ally by the trains of the Quartermaster's Department from 
depots established on the great routes of overland travel, to which 
depots supplies are conveyed by contract. The contractors are the 
freighters or merchants of the overland trade. This department has 



244 COBBB8PONDENCE, ETC. 

not statistics to show the extent of this traffic, but it has of late years 
increased with the development of the mines of the central region of 
the continent until it has become a most important interest. Trav- 
elers by the stage from Denver to Fort Leavenworth, a distance of 683 
miles, in the month of July, 1865, were never out of sight of wagon 
trains, belonging either to emigrants or to the merchimts who trans- 
port supplies for the War Department, for the Indian Department, 
and for the mines and settlers of the central Territories. 

Cost of tranBportation of a ponnd of com, hay, clothing, snbsifltence, Itixnher, or 
any other neceesary from Fort Leavenworth to— 

Fort Riley $0.0246 

Fort Union, the depot for New Mexico 1435 

Santa Fe, N. Hex _ 1685 

FortKeamy 0644 

Fort Laramie 1410 

Denver aty, Ck)l<r 164S 

Salt Lake City, Utah 2784 

The cost of a bushel of com purchased at Fort Leavenworth and 
delivered at each of these points is as follows: 

Fort Riley.-.! $2.79 

Fort Union 9.44 

SantaF6 10.84 

FortKeamy 5.03 

Fort Laramie 9.26 

Denver City 10.05 

Salt.Lakeaty 17.00 

To this last point none is now sent. 

The expenses of this department will be reduced by the advance of 
the Pacific railroads, two of which are rapidly moving westward, one 
from Leavenworth toward Fort Riley and the other from Omaha 
toward Fort Kearny. 

The present general mode of transport is by heavy wagons, each 
drawn by ten oxen. The loads of these wagons average 5,500 pounds 
each. Lighter freight and passengers are carried by express in lighter 
wagons, drawn by mules, which animals are almost exclusively used 
in the winter when the grass is covered with snow. 

The heavy trains in dry weather move readily over the prairie 
roads, which outside the limits of the settlements follow the best 
routes, and can make wide detours to avoid sloughs or wet places in 
the prairies. The progress of settlement injures these roads. No 
laws appear to exist reserving the road bed on these great overland 
routes to the public. The Imes of survey of the public lands cross 
the trail at all angles, and each farmer is at liberty to fence in his 
tract according to the unyielding lines of his rectangular boundaries. 

These overland trails, now well-beaten wagon tracks, were originally 
located upon the high and dry swells of the prairie, the most desir- 
able land for agricultural purposes. They followed the best routes 
and sought the easiest crossings of the streams, low grounds, and 
swamps. Near T^eaven worth the progress of inclosure is driving 
them into the wet grounds, and greatly increases the difficulties of 
travel. 

It is much to be desired that in all future land sales the great and 
long-established trails, the highways across the continent, should be 
reserved from sale and be devoted forever as public highways. A 
certain width on each side of them should be marked out by actual 
sur>'ey and reserved for this purpose. Wagon roads across the con- 
tinent will always be needed, even when the railroads are complet-ed. 



UNION AUTHORITIES. 246 

The following is an estimate of the cost of transportation of mili- 
tary stores westward across the plains by contract daring the fiscal 
year ending Jnne 30, 1866: 

L Northern and western route : 

To Utah and poetB on that route $1,584, 119.00 

n. Soathwestem route : 

To Fort Union, N. Mex. , and posts on that route $1 , 801 , 400 

Poets in the interior of New Mexico 188,178 

1,489,578.00 

Cost of the transportation of grain on -above routes, where the 
grain was delivered by contractors and the transportation 
entered into the price paid, same year— 

1. Utah route $2,536,727,68 

2. New Mexico route 697,101.69 

8,228,829.87 

CoBt ot transportation of military stores across the plains same 
year by Oovemment train*— 

1. Utahroute $84,600 

2. New Mexico route 166.780 

201,880.00 

Total by contract and Gk>vemment trains 6,888,866.87 

This expenditure would be reduced by the opening of railroads by 
a sum which would aid materially in paying interest upon the cost of 
their construction. 

The present season has been a very wet one upon the plains. In 
wet weather the heavy wagons are generally compelled to go into 
camp and wait patiently till dry weather makes the roads practicable. 
Any effort to move exhausts the animals and destroys the wagons, 
while the progress of such a train would not average in bad weather 
over many portions of the roads one mile a day. Trains from Fort 
Leavenworth to Denver City have this year occupied from forty-five 
to seventy-four days in the march. 

DIVISION OP INSPECTION. 

The Eighth Division of this office is the division of inspection. Its 
duties are delicarte and difficult. It receives, registers, analyzes, and 
prepares for action of the Quartermaster-General all reports of the 
regular inspectors, or of officers acting as inspectors under orders of 
the Quartermastei^s Department, and all reports of inspections of that 
department by the Inspector-General of the Army which may be 
referred to this office for action. 

It keeps the roster of the officers of the Quartermaster's Depart- 
ment, and keeiMS a careful and minute record of the service of all 
officers as reported to this office. It also prepares and records the 
general and special orders of the department and its nominations for 
assignment to duty. 

The organization of the inspectors of the Quartermaster's Depart- 
ment provides for six inspectors, with the rank of colonel, and a 
chief of the division of inspection. Other officers of the department 
are placed on inspection duty from time to time, as their services are 
needed. 

Since the cessation of hostilities a number of officers have been thus 
employed to collect the information necessary to compel great and 
necessary reductions in the establishment, which had been created 
during the war. 

The report of Col. Q. V. Rutherford, chief of the division of inspec- 
tion, which is herewith, gives in detail the operations of the office. 



246 COBRE8PONDENCE, ETC. 

During the fiscal year 216 reports were received from the inspectois. 
Over 11,000 inventories and reports of inspection of property recom- 
mended for sale or condemnation and 293 reports of boaids of snrvey 
were received and acted on. 

A record of the appointment, movements, services, and duties of 
each officer of the Quartermaster's Department, and of reports of com- 
manding officers and inspectors in relation to his periformance of 
duty has been kept. Five hundred and ninety-one annual reports of 
officers were rendered during the fiscal year, and 340 such reports 
have been received since its termination. From the information 
given in these reports, tables of quantities and of expenditures by 
officers have been prepared, which accompany this report. 

Several boards for examination of officers of this department have 
been in session during the year. Two hundred and forty-three officers 
have been examined, of whom forty-nine were reported by the boards 
as disqualified and 194 as qualified. 

On the 30th of June, 1865, there were in the Qartermaster's Dei>art- 
ment: 

Regular officers (17 

Miutary store-keepers _ 11 

Assistant quartermasters of Yolnnteers 488 

Total, inclading eleven military store-keepers 566 

Many of these officers have, for distinguished services during the 
war, received brevet promotion beyond their lineal rank. Many have 
been assigned to important positions, to which, under the law, 
increased, thoagh temporary, rank is attached. 

The report of the inspection division gives details as to the number 
of officers who have won such distinction. For the names I must 
refer to the tables accompanying this report, in which most of them 
are mentioned, and to the Army Register. During the fiscal year 
there were appointed 5 assistant quartermasters of the Regular Army, 
145 assistant quartermasters of the Volunteer Army, and 2 military 
store-keepers. 

During the fiscal year there retired from the service 5 assistant 
quartermasters of the Regular Army and 203 assistant quarter- 
masters of volunteers. Since the termination of the fiscal year, and 
to the Ist of October, 1 assistant quartermaster of regulars, 1 mili- 
tary store-keeper, and 172 assistant quartermasters of volunteers 
have retired from the service, resigned, dismissed, or honorably mus- 
tered out. 

The reduction is still going on rapidly, as troofMS are discharged 
and posts abandoned, and the services of these officers can be dis- 
pensed with. Three hundred and eighty-two officers in all left the 
service of the Quartermaster's Department between the 1st of July, 
1864, and the Ist of October, 1865. 

The distribution of general orders to officers of the Quartermaster's 
Department is part of the duty of the inspection division. It dis- 
tributed during the fiscal year 177,289 copies of general orders, of 
which 124,177 were general orders of the Adjutant-General's Office. 

Colonel Rutherford's vigilance and promptness in the discharge of 
his duties have been most important aids in the supervision of the 
extended operations of this department, and I am happy to acknowl- 
edge the recognition which they have met from the Secretary of War. 



UNION AUTHORITIES. 247 

ACCOUNTS FOR MONEY AND PROPERTY. 

The assistant quartermaster-general has charge of the examination 
of the accounts of disbursing officers and of officers responsible for 
public property (other than property accounts of clothing, camp and 
garrison equix)age, which latter accounts are examined in the division 
of clothing and equipage). 

The chief of the Ninth Division reports that there were received at 
this office in the fiscal year ending June 30, 1862, 7,094 accounts, all 
of which have been examined and transmitted to the Treasury for 
settlement. 

In the year ending June 30, 1863, there were received 29,153, all of 
which have been examined and transmitted to the Treasury, 

In the yearending June 30, 1864, there were received 67,856 accounts; 
of these there have been examined and transmitted to the Treasury 
14,588. There remain to be examined 53,268. 

In the year ending June 30, 1865, there were received 72,299 accounts; 
of these there have been examined and transmitted to the Treasury 
12,424. There remain to be examined 59,875. 

During the four years, July 1, 1861, to June 30, 1865, there were 
received inaU 176,402 accounts; examined and sent to the Treasury 
63,259; remaining to be examined 113,143. 

These are not single vouchers, but accounts, many of which contain 
hundred.s, and some of them thousands, of single vouchers. They 
represent the expenditure of over one thousand millions of dollars in 
money, and the use and application of the property purchased there- 
with. The delay in their final settlement is injurious alike to the 
officer and to the Government, and it is of great importance that their 
settlement be expedited by all the means in the power of the Govern- 
ment. It is from the filial examination and discussion of these 
accounts that the statistical information necessary to a proper under- 
standing of the cost of the great war, now happily ended, is to be 
obtained. These accounts record the purchases of materials ; the cost 
of movements by rail, river, and sea; the application of the materials 
purchased ; the distance men and material were transported ; the cost 
and extent of the hospitals, barracks, store-houses, and camps which 
have covered the country with buildings and canvas. 

RexK>rtB made by officers are often imperfect; their accounts for 
purchases must be complete; and these accounts record the actual 
cost and the time of purchase of every article provided by the Quarter- 
master's Department during the war, from the ocean steamer of 2,500 
tons to the saddler's or tent-maker's needle and thread. 

In the last annual report of this department attention was called to 
the inadequate force provided by law for the prompt examination of 
officers' accounts, and a recommendation was made for the increase of 
that force by the addition of 170 clerks, classified as follows: 70 of 
class one, 60 of class two, 30 of class three, and 10 of class four. 
Another year's experience makes more urgent the necessity of this 
increase, and I repeat the recommendation of the last annual report. 

mUTARY ORGANIZATION OP BMPLOYisS OF THE QUARTERMASTER'S 

DEPARTMENT. 

In the last annual report of this office I had the honor to report the 
services rendered in the field, as soldiers, at Nashville, at Johnson- 
ville, and at Washington City, by the Quartermaster's Volunteers, a 



248 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. 

military organization nnder your sanction, of the clerks, agents, and 
operatives of the Quartermaster's Department at the principal depots. 
Since that report was written the Quartermaster's Volunteers at Nash- 
ville, under the command of Bvt. Brig. Gen. J. L. Donaldson, have 
again had the opportunity to render important service. Two brigades 
of these troops, 4,500 strong, were assigned a position in the operations 
of the 15th and 16th of December, 1864, the days of the decisive battle 
of Nashville, and so conducted themselves as to merit and receive the 
approval of their commanders. 

The surrender of the rebel armies having made their services no 
longer necessary, the several brigades and regiments have been 
disbanded, and most of their meml^rs have, in the general reduction 
of the force employed, been discharged from service. The arms and 
equipments have been returned to the Ordnance Department. 

Colored men continued to the close of the war to be employed in 
connection with the trains of the Quart-ermaster's Department as 
laborers at depots, as pioneers with the marching columns. In all 
these positions they have done good service and materially contributed 
to that final victory which confirmed their freedom and saved our 
place among nations. 

I cannot close this report without calling your attention to the 
services rendered by the officers and agents of this department. Some 
of these officers had at the beginning of the war the advantage of 
previous experience in the Quartermaster's Department during former 
wars, but by far the greater part of them were taken from the occupa- 
tions of civil life, without military training or experience. Many of 
them as the war went on were promoted from the ranks of the volun- 
teers. A very few have proved unfaithful, but the great body of them 
have served laboriously and zealously, successfully and honorably. 

Whether in the field or at the depot, there is no intermission to the 
labor and the responsibility of a quartermaster. In the field he is 
expected to overcome the difficulties of the road cut up by the pas- 
sage of troops and artillery, and to run the gauntlet of a hostile pop- 
ulation in the rear of the armies — a population exasperated by the 
loss of property taken by foragers. Often insufficiently guarded, 
upon his vigilance and energy depend the safety of his train and of 
the indispensable supplies which it bears. Long after the troops are 
at rest in their camps the quartermaster is ujwn the road. 

At the depot of an army the reception, care, and distribution of the 
immense supplies of food, ammunition, and clothing, and all other 
equipment, all of which pass through the hands of the quartermaster, 
tax him night and day. He is held to strict accountability for every 
item of the stores which pass through his hands. 

In the greater depots which have been during the war the centers at 
which the business of providing for the Army has been concentrated, 
the officers in charge have borne the responsibility of disbursing 
millions of dollars, collecting, auditing, and settling the vouchers 
issued by officers at smaller depots and in the field, and purchasing 
the stores to be distributed to armies through wide districts. Some 
of these officers have transacted business to the amount of millions 
monthly. From officers of every rank, from those in charge of the 
great centers of manufacture and purchase at the principal cities, 
from those to whom has been committed onlj'^ the care of the property 
and trains of a single brigade, I have received and I recognize cordial 
support and assistance in the business committed to this department. 



UNION AUTHORITIES. 249 

It is well understood among soldiers that upon the efficiency and 
integrity of the supply branches of the service depends, in a great 
degree, the power to make long marches, the health and efficiency of 
the troops. 

I have imperfectly set forth in this report some of the more impor- 
tant operations of the Quartermaster's Department during the past 
year. I hoi)e at a future time to be able to present to you more com- 
plete and detailed information of the extent of the resources, in 
material and men and money, which under your administration of the 
War Department have been applied to support and sustain the 
armies in every part of the wide field of operation during the past 
four years of war. 

This information pro];)erly digested, if published, will stand before 
the world as an example and a warning of the power and resources 
of a free people for any contest into which they heartily enter, and 
from it the soldier and statesman will be able to draw valuable lessons 
for use in case it ever again becomes necessary for this Nation to put 
forth its strength in arms. 

The merits and services of many of the officers of the department 
have been presented to you by myself, or by the generals under whom 
they have served in the field. I acknowledge the kindness with which 
their claims and my recommendations have been considered, and 
thank you for the recognition which has been given by their promo- 
tion of the services of the department which I have had the honor 
to control. 

I transmit herewith reports of officers, with many tables, giving in 
detail information of value in i*elation to the operations of the depart- 
ment. To these I respectfully call your attention.* 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

M. C. MEIGS, 
Brevet Major- Oeneral^ U, S, Army, QuartermcLster-Oeneral, 

No. 1. 

On Jane 30, 1864, the termination of the preceding fiscal year, 
the balances in the hands of officers (after deducting the dis- 
bursements ascertained from accounts which had passed the re- 
quired administrative examination of this office) amounted, as 

stated in the last annual report, to $296,968,860.36 

From which there is to be made a further deduc- 
tion of the amount of disbursements, ascer- 
tained from accounts for periods prior to and 
of the fiscal year ending June 30, 1864, which 
had been received and re^tered, but of which 
the required administrative examination had 
not been made, viz : 

Prior to the fiscal year $26,096,845.50 

Daring the fiscal year 201,064.148.97 

'■ $227,160,494.47 

Leas amount shown to have been received from 

sales of property, rent of buildings, &c 5, 820, 948. 99 

221,839,550.48 



Leaving an outstanding balance due June 80, 1864, of 75, 629, 818. 88 

• Such of these reports and tables as are here omitted will be found in Execu- 
tive Document No. 1, House of Representatives, Thirty-ninth Congi*ess, firpt ses- 
sion. Vol. I, unless otherwise indicated as appearing in Series I, or elsewhere in 
this series. 



250 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. 

Which was made up as follows, yiz : 

1. Amount of requisitions drawn during the 

fiscal year 1864, the accounts for dis- 
bursement of which had not been re- 

ceivedatthis oflfcje $81,317,806.00 

A lar^e portion of this, although remitted 
durmg the fiscal year, coula not have 
been received before its termination, 
and could not, therefore, be accounted 
for during that fiscal year; the greater 
portion had doubtless been accounted for 
direct to the proper accounting officer of 
the Treasurv Department, as required 
bv the act of Congress approved July 17, 

2. Amount in the hands of officers, to be ac- 

counted for hereafter 44,811,612.88 

875,629,818.88 

Of this latter amount the sum of $8,878,279.87 was amount of 
requisitions drawn during the fiscfl^ years 1862 and 1868 in favor 
of officers, not taken up in their accounts received at this 
office, viz : 

In the fiscal year 1862 $1,579,471.87 

In the fiscal year 1868 1,798.799.00 

3,378,270.87 

The sum of $24,886,849.80 was amount in hands of officers unac- 
counted for (as ascertained from balances found due the Gov- 
ernment upon examination of the last accounts received and 

from receipts for advances made to officers for disbursement 
during the fiscal year 1864) by officers whose accounts had been 
rendered 24, C36, 849. 80 

Of this amount the sum of $20,895,967.70 was the 
amount of balances found due the Government 
upon examination of the last accounts received 
in the fiscal year 1864 $20,895,967.70 

The balance, $3,440,882.10, was the amount of the 
receipts for advances niade to officers for dis- 
bursements during the fiscal year 1864, not 
taken up in the accounts received at this office, 
as before stated 8,440,882.10 

The greater portion of this hadprobably been accounted for direct 
to the proper accounting officers of the Treasury Department, 
as reouired by the act of Congress before referred to. The re- 
mainder was distributed amon^ the officers disbursing at the 
various posts and stations and m the field, and was applicable 
to the payment of debts contracted during the year. It was . . 16, 696, 892. 21 

Total amount, as above 44,811,512.88 



Balance for which the accounts had not received the required 

administrative examination of this office, as above reported . . . 296, 968, 869. 86 
To which are to be added: 

1. Remittances in July, 1864 $88,684,250.00 

Remittances in August, 1864 82,976,611.00 

Remittances in September, 1 864 25. 476, 722. 41 

Remittances in October, 1864 24, 151, 957. 00 

Remittances in November, 1864 85, 704, 491. 00 

Remittances in December, 1864 41, 124, 842. 60 

Remittances in January, 1865 7,466,068.10 

Remittances in February, 1865 600,000.00 

Remittances in March. 1865 90,841,901.94 

Remittances in April. 186»» 49,813.329.76 

Remittances in May, 1865 69,880,447.73 

Remittances in June, 1865 25,585,940.91 

431,706,057.44 

2. Proceeds of sales of property, rents of buildings, &c 3, 620, 997. 88 

Total to be accounted for 782,296,924.68 



UKION AUTHORITIES. 251 

From which are to be dedncted the disbursements by oflBcers, 
ascertained from aocoants which have passed the required 
administrative examination of this ofSce, viz : 
Prior to the fiscal year (the accounts for 
which had not jMssed the required admin- 
istrative examination in time for the hist 

annual report) $1 67 , 746, 758 . ft7 

Inthemonthof July, 1864 13,816,518.08 

In the month of August, 1864 16,971,042.81 

In the month of September, 1864 11,254,075.61 

In the month of October, 1864 8,062,686.55 

In the month of Novemlier, 1864 2,558, 155.61 

In the month of December, 1864 8,176,601.08 

In the month of January, 1865 858,742.04 

In the month of February, 1865 1,867,086.64 

In the month of March, 1865 480,870.08 

In the month of April, 1865 268,275.85 

In the month of May, 1865 869,061.42 

In the month of June, 1865 208,608.70 

$226,119,862.24 

Balance due June 80, 1865 506,176,562.44 

From which there is to be made a further deduction of the amount 
of disbursements, as ascertained from accounts for periods 

grior to and in the fiscal :fear ending June 80, 1865, which 
ave been received and registered, but of which the required 
administrative examination has not been made, viz : 

Amount prior to the fiscal year 1866 $82,446,154.51 

Amount m the fiscal year 1865 875,982,744.71 

Total 458,878,899.22 

Less amount shown to have been received from 

sales of property, rent of buildings, &c 12,005,976.93 

446,872,923.29 

Leaving an outstanding balance due June 80, 1865, of 59, 808, 640. 15 

Which is made up as follows, viz : 

1. Amount of requisitions drawn in favor of officers and not 

taken up in their accounts received at this office, viz : 

In the fiscal year 1862 $996,287.87 

In the fiscal year 1868 417,988.00 

In the fiscal year 1864 447,916.00 

In the fiscal year 1865 8,628,557.99 

Total 10,890,749.86 

2. Amount of advances made to ofOcers for disbursements not 

taken up, as ascertained from the accounts received at 

this office, viz : 

In the fiscal year 1864 $615,660.55 

In the fiscal year 1865 4,176,717.71 

Total 4,792,878.36 

8. Amount in the hands of officers and agents, accounted for 
as balances due the Government, ascertained upon 
examination of their last accounts received 44, 620, 513. 08 

The amounts paid during the fiscal year ending June 80, 1865 
(including those for purchases made and services rendered in 
the preceoing fiscal year, and not included in the last annual 
report), as ascertained from the accounts which passed the 
required administrative examination of this office, were, viz : 
1. For regular supplies, viz : 

Fuel $8,159,423.61 

Forage 50,584,487.59 

Straw 191,175.28 

Stationery 618,688.65 

M, 553, 775. 08 



252 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. 

2. For incidental expenses of the Army, viz : 

Postage $150,379.93 

Expenses of courts-martial 203,886.79 

Express and escorts 21,650.46 

Burial expenses 128,940.12 

Qnides, interpreters, and spies 167, 262. 48 

Clerks and agents 1,888,582.07 

Pay of wagon and forage masters 4, 116. 61 

Laborers 4,012,721.91 

Soldiers on constant labor 878,428.22 

Hire of veterinary surgeons 28,041.01 

OfQce furniture 90,961.54 

Medicines for horses and other animals. 107, 522. 79 

Forges, blacksmiths* and shoeing tools. . 181, 740. 55 

Horse and mule shoes, nails, iron, and 

steel, for shoeing 1,580,887.68 

Picket rope 457.86 

Apprehension of deserters 450,202.16 

$9,840,181.62 

8. Cavalry and artillery horses 10,749,054.85 

4. Transportation and supply of prisoners, &c 156,240.89 

5. Telegraph for military purposes, and expenses in operating 

thesame 245,420.27 

6. Barracks and quarters, viz : 

For rent $1,562,140.28 

For repairs and construction 5, 778, 531. 51 

7,840,671.79 

7. Mileage— transportation of oflOcers and baggage 258, 078. 94 

8. Transportation, viz : 

Of clothing $268,588.88 

Of subsistence 1,620,087.89 

Of ordnance 476,235.88 

Of troops and supplies 80,776,781.72 

88,141,692.87 

9. Purchase of stoves 809,628.71 

10. For material for and amount expended in the purchase and 

preparation of clothing, camp and garrison equipage ... 59, 807, 028. 77 

11 . Collecting, drilling, and organizing volunteers 9, 292. 08 

12. For the construction and maintenance of the gun-boat fleet 

proper 295,177.91 

13. For the purchase, construction, and maintenance of steam 

rams 190,918.25 

14. Special expenditures for other departments, and under 

special appropriations, viz : 

For Medical D^rtment $86, 881 . 86 

For Ordnance Department 27, 921. 68 

For Pav Department 9,987.14 

For Subsistence Department 2,449.58 

For En^neer Department 80,675.88 

For Adjutant-General's Department ... 2, 564. 50 

For Army contingencies 89,515.15 

For Provost-Marshal-Generars Depart- 
ment : 4,220.46 

For Signal Service 175.88 

60,866,882.20 



226,151,492.51 
Less amount of errors, &c., ascertained in oi&cers' accounts. ... 82, 180. 27 



Total 226,119,362.24 

From the above statement it will be seen that during the past vear accounts to 
the amount of $226,119,362.24 have passed the official examination of this office, 
prior to transmission to the Treasury for final examination and settlement. They 
number 7,066; and 12,189 accounts remain in this office to be examined, relating 
to disbursements, amounting to $458,378,899.22. 

During the vear preceding the li^t annual report from this office the accoimts 
examined and transmitted to the Treasury covered disbursements to the amount 
of $284,809,697.72. 



UNION AUTHOBITIES. 



253 



Aimtraei of a p propriations for the Quariermaster*8 Department for the fiscal 
years 136t'-l866, induding arrearages for 1861. 



Heada of appropriatioiia. 




•1^ u 

ll 



It 



t£ 



Qaartemiaater'a Department $14,965,060.87 

iMtdMital ezpenaee of the Quarter- 7.866. 666.00 
maatar's Department. 

Parehaae of horaea ' 10,514,50aO0 

Binaeks,qiiArtera,*e I 1,600.000.00 

TkasaportotioD of the AmiT I 16,820.064.00 

Tranaportation of offlcws' oaggage. . 500, 000. 00 

Clothtaic of the Axmy 18.416,037.08 

Military telegraph ' 

Tranaportatioii of prlaonera 



ApinopTlatioii for atoves. 
CMiBoung. organiilng, and drilling 
▼olnnteera. 

Ooaatmetion, Ac., of eteam rams 

Qon-boala for Weefeem rirera 

OontlBgaietoa of the Army 



Total 65.088.216.80 5,000,000.00 



1,000,000.00 
200.000.00 



$1,661,040.00 



14.881,000.00 

'ia,'i7a,'5i6.*n 



$i8,ooo,ooaoo 

8,000.000.00 

5.000,000.00 

500,000.00 

23,000.000.00 



20,000,000.00 

"i.'666.'66a6o 



$6,000,000.00 



28,715,586.77 



76.500,000.00 





fiscal year ending 
June 80, 1863. 


Deficiency biU for the 
fiscal year ending 
June 80. 1863. 


ilscai year ending 
June 80, 1864. 


jll 


iDddeutal expenses of the Quarter- 

maatar'a Departmeot. 
Parehase of horsea 


tt&012,000.00 
», 886. 750. 00 

5.400.000.00 
4,234.000.00 

40.000.000.00 
1.291,600.00 

89,322,518 25 




$67,217,791.00 
19.125,000.00 

23.188,375.00 
8,000,000.00 

56.500,000.00 
1, 000. 000. 00 

76.281,911.54 
500. 000. 00 


$18,600,000.00 
2, 000, 000. 00 


11.000,000.00 

1,730,000.00 

26,000,000.00 


17.500.000.00 


Barracka, qnarters, Ac.r.... 


30,000,000.00 
100 000 00 


ClothincoftheAnny 71?..^^... 


27.188,000.00 


7. 000. 000 00 




' 500i 666. 00 








3,873.728.00 
90,000.00 





1.500,000.00 
110.000.00 








., 


Colleeting, organising, and drilling 
Construction, Ac, of steam mras. . . . 







:*:'' : 


580,000.00 


450,000.00 




Gun-boats far >7estem rivers 


2,560,000.00 






Conting«DeJee of the Army 


500,000.00 




600. 66(). 66 











Xottf 


156.100,591.25 


71,816,000l00 


253,454,677.54 


78.600.000.00 





254 



COBBBSPOlfDEHCE, ETC. 



Abatract of a p propriation* for the Quartenmaaier^$ D^partmaU for the 
yean J96t-1866, indmdmg arrtaroqa for 1^/— Contmned. 





1 


1 


31 


^ 


faddesUl npesuH of tlj# Qiurt<r- 

BiHtcrBl>«p«rtiD«t. 
FsrebMH of hnnn , 


000.000,000.00 
13,000,000.00 

11,000.000.00 

ft. 000, 000. 00 

40.000.000.00 

700.000.00 


810^000,000.00 
1,000.000.00 

7,000,000.00 
1.000,008.00 
18,868,137.00 


880,000.000.00 
10.008.000.00 

11,008.800.00 

30,000^000.00 
600.000.00 

50,000,000.00 

600.000.00 

1,000,000.00 

100.000.00 


8188.884.860.37 
78, 8a. 418. 00 

123.884.815.00 

31,484«000.00 

94.458.00LOO 

4,001.800100 


Hkfnucktt niiATt^n A f i ■ ■ < . ■ n n n i . . . 


ClothltjjtofllieApiiij 

Military ViA^%t%J^\\ 


58.000.000.00 
17ft. 000. 00 


71K.O0o!flO 


342.338,008.58 

1,800.008.08 

8,773,718.00 

480,000.00 

ft. 000, 000. 00 




000,000.00 ' l.MiA.mA.fio 




100,000.00 




Conttm cation, A.ti.^ of itmni rvm. ... 




37ft, 000. 00 






1,306^000.00 


Oiin -Iv^t ft fit r W MtJ^rn H vrw .... . . 






3,688.800.00 
1,108,000.00 


CoDtJiiff«iicla« of th« Anav.. ... ... 


400,00a 00 




400.800.00 










ToUl 


190.150,000.00 1 83.181,137.00 


108,100,000.00 


1,184,300,808.96 






W, 1864, for dothiof. Ae., of lOO- 
days' Tolanteen. 


1 




8,000,000.00 


1 

1 







f 0TB.— AppropriatioiM for oontiDgoiidM of the Amy, thoagh faieladed In the Aonoal oottmatM of 
) QnartarmMter-Oeneral, bare not of Uto years been expended aoder hie direetton; tbey are not. 



KOTB.- 

therefore, included in the anmming op of the appropriations for the Qaartermaeter*s Department in 
this table. 



No. 2. 

Quartermaster-General's Office, First Division, 

Washington, D, C, October 17, 1866. 
Bvt. Maj. Oen. M. C. Meios, 

(ifmrtermcufter'Oeneral U. S, Army, Washington, D. C: 

General: In compliance with General Orders, No. 39, Quartermas- 
ter-Grenerars Office, dated July 1, 1865, 1 have the honor to submit the 
following annual report, embracing the operations of this division for 
the fiscal year ending June 30, 1865, together with general statements 
of operations up to the present date, as required by circular from the 
Quartermaster-General of the 24th of July, 1865: 

My annual report for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1864, was for- 
warded to the Quartermaster-General, from this division, on the 27th 
of September, 1864. 

During the last fiscal year, and up to the present time, I have been 
stationed at Washington, D. C, continuing to perform the duties of 
chief quartermaster of the Cavalry Bureau, to which I had been 
assigned, by order of the War Department, on the 27th of December, 
1863, relieving Lieut. Col. C. G. Sawtelle. In addition to these duties 
I have, since the 2d of August, 1864, performed those pertaining to 
the office of colonel and brevet brigadier-general in charge of the First 
Division of the Quartermaster-Generars Office, having been assigned, 
by order of the War Department, to these duties at the date just men- 
tioned, under the act of Congress of Julv 4, 1864, to provide for the 
better organization of the Quartermasters Department. 



UNION AUTHORITIES. 255 

As chief quartermaster of the Cavalry Bureau I was charged with 
the purchase and supply of all animals required for the cavalry 
branch of the service, under the immediate orders of Maj. Gen. II. W. 
Ifalleck, chief of staff, and subsequently under those of Lieutenant- 
General Grant. As the officer in charge of the First Division of the 
Qnartermaster-Greneral's Office, I was charged with the purchase, pro- 
cnrement, and disposition of hoi*se8 and mules for cavalry, artillery, 
wagon and ambulance trains, and all other purposes for which horses 
and mules may be procured for the armies of the United States. The 
dnties of both these assignments I still continue to discharge. 

It is a source of great satisfaction to me that during the great 
campaigns immediately preceding the downfall of the rebellion, as 
indeed in preceding operations against the enemy, the Cavalry Bureau 
and this division were enabled, with the energetic co-operation of the 
various quartermasters and assistant quartermasters at the several 
purchasing depots under my direction, to meet promptly all requisi- 
tions for the supply of public animals to onr gallant armies in the 
field. The animals thus furnished were generally of a very good 
quality, owing to the rigid character of the inspection made by the 
inspecting officers, who were governed in their actions by General 
Orders, No. 43, of the Quartermaster-General, series 1864. As the war 
progressed those furnished to the Armies of the Potomac and James, 
especially, were so superior as to elicit the commendation of Bvt. Maj. 
Gen. Rufus Ingalls, chief quartermaster, from whose indorsement of 
November 30, 1864, forwaMing estimate of public animals required 
for these armies for the month of December, 1864, the following is an 
extract: 

The supply (of animals) is already very good, and it is proper to state that the 
artillery and cavalry horses sent to these armies dnring the past three months 
have been the best we have received daring the war. 

Testimonials of a similar character were received during the past 
year from chief quartermasters in the armies of the South and 
Southwest. 

The business of my office does not require the rendition of either 
of the statements called for in paragraphs 3, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, and 11, 
of General Orders, No. 39, Quartermaster-Generars Office, current 
series. 

It will be seen by statement herewith that under the immediate 
direction of the several officers in charge of purchasing depots within 
the control of the Cavalry Bureau and First Division, Quarteimaster- 
Generars Office, there were purchased as follows, viz: 

CAVALRY HORSES. 

Prom January l,1864,to JnneSO, 1864, per last report 48,719 

From January 1 , 1S64, to Jnne 90. 1864, per reports subsequently received. 3, 087 

Total from January 1,1864, to June 30, 1864 51,756 

From June 80, 1864, to December 31, 1864 98,555 

From January 1, 1865, to May 9, 1865, when purchase ceased 43, 077 

Total purchased during the year ending June 30. 1865 141, 632 

Total purchased from January 1 , 1864 , to May 9,1865 198, 888 

ARTILLERY HORSES. 

FromSeptember 1,1864, to December 81, 1864 12,458 

FromJanuaryl,1865, toMay9, 1865 8,261 

Total purchased from September 1 , 1864, to May 0, 1865 20, 714 



256 COBBBSPONDENCE, ETC. 

MULB8. 

Prom September 1,1864. to Decsember 81, 1864 30,711 

Prom January 1, 1865, to May 9, 1865 25,210 

Total pnrchased from September 1, 1864, to May 9, 1865 45,921 

There are no records on file in this office by which the number of 
animiUs purchased by the Cavalry Bureau prior to January 1, 1864^ 
can be determined. 

Reports to this office of purchases of artillery horses and mules 
date from September 1, 1864. 

During the fiscal year ending June 30, 1865, the prices paid for 
cavalry horses ranged from $144 per head (the lowest contract price) 
to $186 per head (the highest market price). From September 1, 
1864, to June 30, 1865, the prices paid for artillery horses ranged 
from $161 to $185 per head, and during the latter period the prices 
paid for mules ranged from $170 to $196 per head. The average 
(approximate) prices are given in the tabular statement herewith. 

The following is a statement of the number of public animals sold 
and died at the several depots since the Ist of January, 1864, viz: 

CAVALRY HORSBB. 

Sold from January 1,1864, to June 80, 1864 5,845 

Sold from June 80, 1864, to December 81, 1864 8,598 

Sold from January 1, 1866, to June 80, 1865 25,627 

Total sold from January 1 , 1864, to June 80 , 1865 40, 070 

Died from January 1,1864, to June 80, 1864 8,484 

Died from June 80, 1864, to December 81, 1864 18,662 

Died from January 1,1865, to June 80, 1865 16,181 

Total died from January 1 , 1864, to June 80, 1865 88, 277 

ABTILLEBT HORSBS. 

Of artillery horses none were reported as sold from September 1, 1864, to June 
80, 1865. 

DiedfromSeptember 1,1864, to December 81, 1864 176 

Died from January 1, 1865, to June 80, 1865 258 

Total died from September 1,1864, to June 80, 1865. 484 

MtTLES. 

SoldfromSeptemberl, 1864, to December 81, 1864 287 

Soldfrom January 1,1865, to June 80, 1865 18.122 

Total sold from September 1, 1864, to June 80, 1865 18,479 

Died from September 1, 1864, to December 81, 1864 1,280 

Diedfrom January 1.1865, to June 80, 1865 6,106 

Total died from September 1,1864, to June 80, 1865 7,886 

Of unserviceable stock received at depots for recuperation, the 
returns to this office are not sufficiently complete to enable me to 
pronounce the exact proportion restored to ability for service. 
Observations made at several depots during limited periods indicate 
60 per cent, as about the proportion so restored. It is a matter of 
regret that, although several attempts have been made by this office 
to procure returns of the destruction of animals in the field, such 



UNION AUTHOBITISS. 257 

returns have not been obtained. Without doubt this destruction has 
been very great, especially in the army operating in the Shenandoah 
Valley under General Sheridan. The issues of cavalry horses to this 
force were at the rate of three remounts per annum. 

Following this is the report of animals purchased and issued at 
the several dei>ots referred to and also statement of quartermasters' 
property, marked A. 

BepoficfihepUTtiiam and uaue of cavalry honet at dqaoU under directum of the 
CateaiBry Bureau during the eix manihe ending beoember Sl^ I864,* 

SUMMABT TO FORBOOIKO TABLB. 



PnrehMed Ju^ 1 to DMenlwr 81, 1804. . 



17.607 
tt,6W 

Bao0hr«di!ronisaii4x7MNixoM 60,060 

Bae6iT«d fipom artOlwy (tnntfemd) 1,646 



Toiid 177,667 



iMaedtodopwtmento 121,681 

Sold rr. 8.668 

Lttii,dM«roT«d. Middled 18,668 

Tnntfomd to artin«i7 4,014 

On hndnMOBibflr 81,1864 88,888 



Totid 177,687 



Report ofthepurehaee and ieeue of cavalry Jioraee at dq^toteunder direction of the 
Firet bivieton, Quartermaeter-wnerale Office, during the eix monthe ending 
June SO, 1S6S* 

BUIOCABY. 



Ob biaid aft depoUJaawtfT 1,1806 80^888 

PoreluwedfhiaiJMiiuvyl to)Cfty9^18e8. 48,077 

B«o0|y«dfkommiiidi7toiuoM 48,484 

B«MiT«dft«nartUla7(teHMft>nd) 8,887 



Totol 118,180 



iMMdtod^pMtaMBto 60,886 

Sold .VT. 88^017 

Lttift,dMtraT6d, and died 16^181 

TniMftRVd to MtiUery 1,680 

Ob hnd June 80, 1866 14,817 

Totol 118,180 



Saaort of the nurchaee and ieeue of artillery horeee at depots under direction of 
the Firet Division, Quartermaster-Cfenerats Office, from SeptentJber 1, IS64, to 
June30,JS66^ 

SUICICABY TO FOBBOOINO TABLE. 

iMUfldtodApuiiiMoto 16,688 

Lost, dMtimd, Mid died 484 

TraastereatooBTaliT 4,878 

On hnd jrn]M80, 1866. 8^476 



ODbflid aft d^potoStplambOT 1,1884 846 

PvrahaMd ftnm BapUnberl, 1864, to IC117 

0,U66 20,714 

Bae«iT«dftom sundry tooroea 800 

B ee al ^a d ftxwn eaTaky (tganafcrred) 2,014 



Total 28,864 



Total 28,864 



BovBi^ATenga price only approztmato. Nnmber sbown on report of eavalry aa transferred to 
artlDflry. 6,644 ; number shown 00 report of artUlery aa reoalTOd ftom earalry, 2,014 1 di(brene^ 8,630. 
BzplaiBed thne: ArtQlary bocaea sent to Qieabenmgh ware recetrad aa OBTaiiy and altorwaxd tcana- 
ftrred to artOlery. 

Beport of the purchase and issue of mules at dgpots under direction of the First Divie- 
um, Quartmnaster-OeneraTs Office, from /September 1, ISSJ^ to June SO, 186S.^» 

SUmCABY TO FORBGOnro TABLB. 



On baad at dapoto September 1,1864 16,886 

Puxohaoed September 1, 1864, to June 80, 

1846 46,881 

BeceiTedftomenndxysooroee... 67,080 



leaned to dopartmento 61,811 

Sold 18,478 

Loot, deatroyed, and died 7,886 

OnbandatdepotoJnneSO, 1866 88^168 

118,886 Total 118,886 

iL.'^tatement of quartermaster's property for the fiscal year endxng June SO, 1866, \ 
SALES OF PUBLIC ANDfALS. 

As far as returns to this office indicate, there has been sold since 
the 8th of May last, in accordance with General Order's, No. 28, 
Quartermaster-Generars Office, current series, the following number 

•Omitted, except the " Sunmary." See foot-note (*), p. 240. 
t Omitted. See pp. 184, 136 of the Ezecntive Document ref ezred to in foot-note 
(•) p. %4S^. 

17 B r-tBebies m, VOL y 



258 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. 

of animals, viz, 53,794 horses and 52,516 males, for which the sum of 
$6,107,618.14 was received. It is probable that when fall returns 
shall have been received the total amount of sales of animals from 
the 8th of May last np to the present time will be found to be upward 
of seven millions of dollars. 

As required by the provisions of General Orders, No. 42, Quarter- 
master-General's Office, current series, these sales, with one or two 
exceptions, have been conducted by employ^ of this department, 
and this course has in all cases proved more advantageous to the Gov- 
ernment than the employment of the professional auctioneers of any 
one locality for sales in that locality. The prices obtained by employ^ 
are generally greater than those secured by local auctioneers. 

The success of this division in supplying the armies in the field has 
been mainly attributable to the zeal and fidelity of the officers acting 
under its orders, among whom I would mention — 

Bvt. Col. C. fl. Tompkins, assistant quartermaster, XJ. S. Army, 
Washington, D. C. 

Capt. Ingham Coiyell, assistant quartermaster, late in charge at 
Saint Louis, Mo. 

Capt. L. Loury Moore, assistant quartermaster, New York City. 

Capt. George T. Browning, assistant quartermaster, Giesborough, 
D. C. 

Capt. E. C. Wilson, assistant quartermaster, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Capt. J. L. Trumbull, assistant quartermaster. Saint Louis, Mo. 

Capt. C. Hay, assistant quartermaster, Washington, D. C. 

Capt. D. W. McClung, assistant quartermaster, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Capt. E. C. Reichenl^h, assistant quartermaster, Harrisburg, Pa. 

Capt. J. M. Bradshaw, assistant quartermaster, late at Chicago, 111, 

Capt. H. A. Du Puy, assistant quartermaster, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Capt. C. H. Gallagher, assistant quartermaster, Wilmington, Del. 

In the claim department I have had the valuable assistance of Bvt. 
Maj. J. T. Powers, assistant quartermaster, f 

All these have served faithfully and energetically, and I take pleas- 
ure in bearing this testimony to the Quartermaster-General. 

The following is a statement of public moneys received and dis- 
bursed by me during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1865: 

On hand July 1,1864 ....- $3,254,732.42 

Received from officers daring the year 873, 888. 75 

Received from Treasury Department 4,851,800.00 

Received from salesof property,&c 20,657.67 

Total 8,501,078.84 

Expended $3,719,070.18 

Transferred to officers 4,295,963.72 

8,015,088.85 

Remaining on hand June 80, 1865..^ 486,044.99 

Deposited as follows : 

First National Bank, Washington 488,192.28 

On hand 2,852.71 

486,044.99 

Estimates made by various quartermasters for the purchase of 
animals during the fiscal year approved by me : 

For the purchase of horses $28,600,456.66 

For the purchase of mules 6,434,637.66 

Total 80,035,094.82 



UNION AUTHOBITIE& 259 

GVASMB. 

The bnsinees in the claim branch of this division has been increasing 
rapidly since the jMussage of the act of Congress of July 4, 1864. 

During the fiscal year ending Jnne 30, 1866, the whole number of 
claims, regular and miscellaneous, filed amounts to 4,174. 

Knxnber acted on 8,782 

Niunber not acted on '. l,88d 

Total 4.174 

Very little progress has been made in the adjustment of these claims, 
as previous to January 1, 1865, only 800 had been filed, 3,374 having 
been filed during the last six months. 

Considering the many disadvantages under which officers of this 
department labored in the discharge of their duties in the field, and 
the necessity of intrusting important positions to acting quarter* 
masters, I find claims for animals taken for public use by them to be 
comi>aratively easv of adjustment, as, with but few exceptions, the 
proper accountability has been rendered except in cases where records 
and papers have been captured or destroyed by the enemy; hence the 
great mass of claims filed is for property taken by unauthorized offi- 
cers of the Army, not accountable to this department. 

The following difficulties are met with in the adjudication of these 
claims, viz: 

First. Where memoranda receipts are given and the signatures of 
the officers certifying are unknown, and the only evidence the claim- 
ants can furnish that the officers took the property are the receipts 
themselves, great difficulty and embarrassment result from not being 
able to determine the genuineness of the signatures. Before the mus- 
ter out of service of the trooiw it was the practice to communicate by 
letter with the officers themselves. The number of receipts given by 
irresponsible and unknown parties in the name of officers has 
attached suspicion to many claims, no doubt just and equitable, which 
I do not feel satisfied to pass upon without the verification of the 
officer's signature. 

Second. Where memoranda receipts have not been given I am of 
opinion that the interests of the Qovemment cannot be sufficiently 
protected by adjudicating these claims upon the ex parte evidence, 
which under present regulations can only be procured. As a gen- 
eral rule, just and equitable decisions cannot be given upon evidence 
presented by claimants unless the department can adopt some practice 
of examining witnesses in the locali^ where the claims originate. 

Proof of loyalty seems to be so easily procured that from the records 
of this division it would seem that few have ever been disloyal, and 
I respectfully suggest that an additional guard be thrown around this 
kind of evidence; at least to require officers and witnesses to state 
their reasons for believing the claimants to have been loyal at the 
dates the claims originated. 

The kind and character of evidence furnished in support of the great 
mass of these claims are insufficient to satisfy me that the property 
has been ''actually received or taken for the use of and used by'' 
the U. S. Army. As the act is now construed a very limited number 
of the claims on file will be allowed, and if a more liberal construc- 
tion is given in regard to the phrase ''proper officer," I would respect- 
fully suggest that a board of officers be appointed in each military 
department to examine and report ui>on these claims. 



260 



COBHESPONDENCE, BTC 



In cloBing this report I canncit but express to the Quartemuister- 
General my high appreciation of the uniform kindness and courtesy 
he has extended toward me in the discharge of my official duties, and 
I feel grateful to that Providence who chooses the bounds of our habi- 
tations for having assigned me, during the prevalence of the great 
slaveholders' rebellion, to a department of mammoth proportions and 
of great resi>onsibility, under the guidance and direction of an officer 
of distinguished ability, with whom I have had such delightful per- 
sonal and official intercourse. 

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

JAMES A. EKIN, 
BvL Brig. G^., in Charge First Division^ Q. M. G. O. 

No. 3. 

Statement of daims (regular and mUceHaneous) filed in the Firtt Division of the 
Ouarterrnatter'Oeneral'9 Office during the flsocu year ending June 30^ 1866, and 
from July i, X866, to October to, 1865, showing the number paid, referred^ and 
recommended for eetUement^ the number rejected and suepenaed, and the number 
not acted on, with their respective amounts. 



Thit. 


Claims flkd. 


Paid, rafemd. 
for MtUement. 


BiUectadandsna- 
pCDded. 


Kotaolodon. 




Num. 
bor. 




AmooBt. 


Horn, 
ber. 


A«nAini£. 


Num- 
ber. 


AmiMint 








From July 1,1864. to Dec. 

31.10M. 
From Jau. 1. 1M5. to 

Jimeao,lM6. 


MO 

3.874 


$248,472.60 1 084 
1.087.100.00 881 


8211,158.60 
356,750.00 


78 

1,038 


$18,279.00 

211,231.00 


27 
1.356 


m. 06a 00 

580.118.00 


Totia during the 
flscftlyear. 
From July 1, IMS. to Oct. 
»,186S. 


4,174 
3.781 


1,345.672.00 
1.367.480.00 


1,675 
210 


567.900.60 
74,514.00 


1.117 
31 


226.508.00 
11.047.00 


t.882 
3.640 


561,168.00 
L. 271, 025. 00 


Total 


7,065 


2,703,058.00 


1,885 


642.414.60 


1,148 


237.550.00 


4,922 


1.823.004.00 





Many claims entered in the column of ** rejected and suspended" 
have been rejected for want of evidence or accountability for the 
property, and may come before the department again; hence the 
impossibility of discriminating between " rejected " and " suspended." 
Many of the claims entered in the column of '^not acted on" are 
under investigation. 
Respectfully submitted. 

JAMES A. EKIN, 
BvL Brig. Oen., in Charge First Divisimiy Q. M. G, O. 
First Division, Quartermaster-General's Office, 

November 8, 1865. 

No. 4. 

Quartermaster-General's Office, 
WasJiington, D. C, October 19, 1865. 
Maj. Gen. M. C. Meigs, 

Quartermaster' Oeneral U. 8. Army, Waahingtoriy D. C: 
General: In response to the circular of the Quartermaster-Greneral 
of July i24, 1805, requiring reports of the operations of the several 



UNION AUTHORITIES. 261 

diyisions of the office daring the fiscal year ending June 30, 1865, 1 
have the honor to submit the following tabular statements collected 
from the tables submitted to this office, in conformity with orders 
therefrom based upon the circular above referred to: 

1. Statement of number of articles on hand and not transferred to 
the armies for issue June 30, 1864, showing the points at which they 
were stored. 

2. Statement of quantity of material purchased during the fiscal 
year ending June 30, 1865, showing the quantity and cost of each kind 
and where purchased; also total quantity and cost of all. 

3. Statement of number of articles of clothing and equipage pur* 
chased and manufactured during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1865, 
showing the quantity and cost of each kind, where purchased or man- 
ufactured; also total quantity and cost of all. 

4. Statement of number of articles on hand and not transferred to 
the armies for issue, June 30, 1865, showing the points at which they 
were stored. 

5. Statement showing the aggregate expenditure for the purchase 
of clothing, equipage, and material at the purchasing depots of New 
York, Philadelphia, and Cincinnati during the fiscal year ending 
June 30, 1865. 

6. Statement showing quantity of material purchased at the depots 
of New York, Philadelphia, and Cincinnati since May, 1861. 

7. Statement showing the number of principal articles of clothing 
and equipage purchased at the depots of New York, Philadelphia, and 
Cincinnati since May, 1861. 

8. Statement showing the highest and lowest prices paid by the 
department for articles of clothing and equipage during the past four 
years of war. 

These tables present in compact form the operations of the cloth- 
ing and equipage division during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1865, 
and, as far as the reports that have been received to date will permit, 
the operations during the last four years of war. 

The clothing and equipage supplied to the Army during the last 
fiscal year have been procured by purchase and manufacture at the 
principal depots of Philadelphia, New York, and Cincinnati, and in 
relatively small quantities at Saint Louis, Quincy, III., Steubenville, 
Ohio, and at Milwaukee, where the work was distributed among the 
needy relatives of soldiers in the ranks of the Union Army. 

The material required for the manufacture of these large supplies 
has been drawn from our own markets, and has generally been made 
from native products. 

Although very large demands have been made on the department 
during the xmst year, they have in no case exceeded its ability to pro- 
duce and issue with promptitude the supplies required for the Army in 
its most extended operations. Perhaps the most prominent instance 
of the kind was the successful supply of Sherman's army after its 
triumphant march through the Southern States to the sea-coast, where 
it found at the right time and in the right places everything needed 
in this branch of the department. 

The articles were shipped principally from the depot at New York 
upon short notice, and it is due to your own foresight and the 
promptness and energy of the officers in charge of the clothing and 
the transportation branches at New York that the success was so 
complete. 



262 COSRESPONDENCE, ETC. 

The tabular statements herewith will afford more precise knowledge 
upon the points referred to than could be given in narrative. The 
results are that there has been produced during the year material 
amounting to $21,416,818.84; equipage, $13,515,305.09; clothing, 
$70,087,282.20 — ^making the exx>enditures for all objects, including 
IMiyment of rents, compensation to employ^, d;c., more than 
$105,019,406.13. 

The commencement of the war found the department prepared 
only for the supply of the old Army-^a force on paper of about 13,000 
men, with an actual strength seldom exceeding 10,000. The supplies 
of clothing and equipage for this force had been drawn entirely from 
the Schuylkill Arsenal, at Philadelphia, where they were manufac- 
tured under the supervision of the officers in charge from materials 
purchased for the purpose. 

The sudden expansion of this small army to the great armies called 
into existence to quell the rebellion rendered necessary corresi>onding 
changes in the administration and operations of the clothing branch 
of the Quartermaster's Department. The manufacturing of clothing 
was increased to the greatest limit possible, employing from 8,000 to 
10,000 operatives at once. Yet this force was found unequal to the 
task before it, and it was soon evident that other sources mu^t be called 
upon to assist in meeting the demands made upon the department. 

Two other principal depots were established in the summer of 1861, 
at New York and Cincinnati, respectively, and under the charge of 
enerffetic and skillful officers enabled the department to furnish 
supjuies nearly as rapidly as required. 

Both the manufacture and purchase by contract of the various 
articles required were pursued at Philadelphia, New York, and Cin- 
cinnati, the manufacture alone not being of itself a sufficient source 
of supply. 

Many of the regiments called into service were clothed and equipi)ed 
through the agency of their State authorities. In some cases where 
authority had been given them by the War Department the States 
were reimbursed through the Quartennaster's Department, after the 
examination of each account and its reference to the proi)er disburs- 
ing officer for settlement, as in the case of his own purchases. In 
other cases States were reimbursed by the United States through the 
Treasury Department under a special act of Congress to that effect. 

The necessity of resorting to this method of partial supply soon 
passed away with the more perfect organization of the department, 
and since the first year of the war the department has been able to 
meet with alacrity every call made upon it. 

Depots for the manufacture and purchase of army clothing and 
equipage, in addition to that at Schuylkill Arsenal, have been estab- 
lished during the war at New York, under General Vinton; at Cin- 
cinnati, under Capt. J. H. Dickerson, but since his resignation it has 
been under the charge of Col. W. W. McKim and Col. C. W. Moulton; 
at Quincy, 111., for the benefit of suffering Union refugees and rela- 
tives of Union soldiers, under the charge of Capt. N. Flagg, assistant 
quartermaster; and for similar objects at Steuben ville, Ohio, under 
Capt. Alexander Conn, assistant quartermaster. Saint Louis, Mo., 
was also at an early date made a prominent point for the manufac- 
ture of clothing, to give relief to impoverished operatives, friends of 
the Union cause in Uiat city. 



UNION AUTHORITIES. 263 

Pnrchases, except when specially authorized to be made in small 
quantities at other points, have only been made at the three depots 
of New York, Philadelphia, and Cincinnati. At all others the arti- 
cles manufactured have been made from material sent from one of 
the three last named, generally from Philadelphia. 

The object for which these smaller depots were established seems 
to have been fully accomplished, and the department has been well 
and economically provided with good serviceable garments near the 
points at which they were wanted for issue. 

The smaller depots above mentioned have, since the termination of 
hostilities in the field, been broken up, in compliance with orders 
from the Secretary of War, and the garments moved to the central 
depots of Saint Louis and Cincinnati. 

Col. W. W. McKim, in charge of the Schuylkill Arsenal, calls the 
attention of the department to the importance of substituting fire- 
proof buildings for the wooden structures now in use as store-houses 
at that depot. 

The value of the property now stored there is about $20,000,000, 
and is in constant danger from fire. Locomotives pass along the entire 
length of the wall on the northern side many times every day and 
night. Colonel McKim reports that he has rearranged the stores, 
endeavoring to place the most valuable in the brick buildings; but 
much of it still remains in the wooden sheds, put up under pressing 
emergencies during the war. 

I respectfully recommend that the brick buildings at present com- 
posing the permanent store-houses of the arsenal be enlarged and 
altered, so that they may be of sufficient dimensions to meet the 
increased wants of the service in this particular. No purchase of 
land would be necessary — simply the enlargement of the present 
buildings as they now stand, on ground owned by the Government. 

It is not deemed necessary to submit details, unless the general plan 
shall be adopted. The matter, however, is one of much importance, 
and I hope it will meet with due consideration by the department. 

The experience of the past war has developed the fact that exact 
uniformity of texture and quality of material and articles are in some 
respects not altogether practicable. The department will, however, 
from that experience, be enabled to arrive at exactly what the markets 
of the country can afford, and thereby determine such standards as 
are attainable by the majority of dealers, and at the same time equal 
to the requirements of the case. I recommend such modifications 
where they are necessary. 

The quantity of clothing and equipage reported on hand June 30, 
1865, being nearly the full supply preparatory to any demand that 
might possibly have been made during the past summer, is large in 
view of the much reduced forces. I am of the opinion, though, that 
were these articles forced upon the market for sale, being of that 
description for which there is no demand outside of the Army, the 
sacrifice would be greater than any loss that may result from damage 
while in store. 

As to the material, much of it I believe might be sold to advantage, 
and I shall submit special reports recommending such disposition to 
be made of it. 

The prices of clothing and equipage during the war were constantly 
advancing, and kept pace with the fluctuations of the Government 



264 COBRSSPONDENCE, ETC. 

currency. I have submitted in illustration of this fact a statement 
showing the highest and lowest prices paid from the beginning to the 
end of the war. It will be observed that the prices of many impor- 
tant articles have more than doubled, and in some instances they have 
even quadrupled their former value. 

The complaints received from the armies as to the inferior quality 
of clothing and equipage have been very few, and have principally 
been confined to articles of equipage, especially knapsacks and haver- 
sacks, which, being manufactured from painted cloth, are from their 
nature subject to great deterioration, particularly when packed 
together, as they necessarily must be for transportation and economy 
of storage. It is generally concaded that the supplies have been of 
the most serviceable quality, and furnished in plentiful quantities. 

The tabular statements submitted herewith do not include the pur- 
chases made by State authorities, the accounts for which have gener- 
ally been settled by the Treasury Department under act of Congress, 
and from appropriation therefor not estimated for by this depart- 
ment. 

They will give, however, in condensed form, full information as to 
the operations of the division of clothing and equipage during the 
last fiBcal year, as well as interesting information concerning its oper- 
ations during the last four years of war. 

Respectfully submitted. 

ALEX. J. PERRY, 
CoUmdy Quartermaster^ in Charge Second Division. 

No. 5. 

Monthly statement of clothing reported on hand at the various clothing depots for 

June SO, 1864.* 

No. 6. 

Monthly statement of camp and garrison equipage reported on hand ai the variona 
clothing depots for June SO, 1864. 



* Omitted. This statement and No. 6 (following) are printed in Vol. IV, this 
series, pp. 907-912. 



UNION AUTHOBITIES. 
No. 7. 



265 



statement of quantity of material purchased during the JUcal year ending June 

SO, 1866, 



ArUelM. 



AlpMMsUaek yuda. 

BantlBC nd, wUto^ and bloe . . piaoM. 

BorlM» yards. 

BncUM, pantaloon grooa. 

BattoBo do.. 

Braid, |-inoh,Mariet yaida. 

Crayoinn, taUon' boxes. 

Dark bine, I yardi. 

Dark bine,! do.. 

Seailetftoing.f do.. 

WliitofMinK.| do.. 

Si.B.ftelnfE»l do.. 

Ootd, tent laong ponnda. 

OottoB, sowing spools. 

1>nck,ootton yards. 

Drminc,ootton,| do.. 



Canton, 
Gray 



^Siiied^i! 



Blue wool, f .~... 

>M 



..do. 
..do. 
..do. 



Blue wool, i do. 

Opera do. 

Hooks and eyes gross. 

Kecsoys : 

Sky-blae,f yaids. 

""^^ T.I 



Sky-blao.1 



Dwk,| 
Linings 



.do.. 
..do.. 
..do.. 



Isoe: 

Wonted ........... .......... .do.. 

Silk do.. 

Lsatber: 

Wax upper feet. 

Sole poands. 

Welt do.. 

Mnalin delaine, llght-bloe yards. 

MnsUn: 

Bleached,! do.. 

Unbleaobed do.. 

Psdding, canvas do.. 



Baling 

Yam 

Bolt 

Silesia, black 

BOk, yellow floss. 



poands. 

r;..do.. 

do.. 

yards. 

poands. 

r..do.. 

Twlnn do.. 

Twine, eotton docen. 

Taotline,nianila poands. 

Wadding doten. 

Webbing yards. 

Webbing, linen. 1| do.. 



Philadelphia. 






18,573i 

1,174 

150,108 

2,405 

208. «M 

42,102 

1,000 

850.0271 
48,258 

1,885 

82 

1.813 

7.810 

88,400 

22,5851 

000.0201 

054,518 
2.120.090 

193,060 
1,892,823 



853. 7n4 

3,087,827i 

2.5261 

899.000 

13,8701 

2,100,458 
30.140 

530.2751 

410. lOOl 

28.107} 

1.012 



.281 
2.19 



II 



Kew York. 



18,458.85 

21.015.00 

51.808.11 

1,273.55 

87.780.15 

480.42 

000.00 

1.874. on. 51 

147.418.00 

5,542.00 

482.42 

0^703.25 

8,777.96 

9,000.75 

10.004.40 ! 

880.000.70 

844.038.04 
1,097,000.84 

872.048.02 
1,815,380.83 



:S» 

.51 
.00 

.27 
.40 
.211 

:i? 

.30 

.301 

15.05 

3.141 



.274 
LOSf 
.85 
.04 



890.00 

870.137.08 
5,891,804.83 

5,580.20 
538,000.00 

9,160.80 

04,150.08 
10,784.04 



107,1 

228.800.27 

14,558.53 

098.28 

141.01 
814,328.25 
25.071.84 

1,781.40 

750.30 

1.093.05 

20,895.02 

150.50 

310.033.12 

2,752.71 

1,307.25 

700.20 

14,175.00 

87.828.85 

421.20 



10,000 



0070.20 



266 



CORRESPONDENCE, ETC 



No. 7. — Statement of quantity of material purchased during the fiscal year end- 
ing June SO, i^e5-— Continued. 



Articles. 



Cincinnati. 



c 

I 



Alpaca. blMk yards.. 2,187^ 

Banting, red, white, and blue . . .pieces 

Burlaps yards . . 102, M3 J 

Buckles, paotaloon gross 

Buttons do... 78,322 

Braid, (inoh. scarlet yards . . a 16, 306 

Crayons, tailors' boxes 

Cloth: 

Dark blue,} yards 

Dark blue,} do... 406.561 

Scarlet facing, I do 

White facing,} do...i 249 

S.B.facing.| do..-! 

Cord, tent lacing pounds 

Cotton, sewing spools.. 

Duck, cotton yards. I 1,493,181 

Drilling, cotton, I do... I 906,841| 

Flannel: 

Canton, f do... 1.990,82» 

Gray twilled. I do.-.l 1,842,028| 

Blue wo<^, 9 do...i 

Bluewool.1 do... I 574,945i 

Opera do...i 1.5171 

Hooks and eyes gross.. I 1,152 

Kerseys : I 

Sky-blue,! yards 

Sky-blue,! do... 416,213^ 

Dwk,|.... do 

Linings do 

Linen, brown do. 

Lace: 

Worsted do... 1,100,092 

Silk do... 

Leather: 

Wax upper feet.. 

Sole pounds.. 

Welt do... 

Muslin delaine, Hght-bluo yards. . 

Muslin: 

Bleached,! do... 

Unbleached do... 

Padding, canvas do. . . 

Bope: 

Baling pounds.. 

Yam do... 

Bolt do... 

Silesia, black yards.. 

Sil k, yellow floss pounds . . 461 

Thread do... 41.337 

Twine do... 11,281J 

Twine, cotton dosen 

Tent line, manila pounds.. 101,788 

Wadding dozen.. 9,610 

Webbing yards.. 20,160 

Webbing, linen, U do... 40,320 



1.791 



.82i 



1. 07 A 



2.071 



P. 



r 



$1,740.46 



83,016.42 



28.388.63 

17,464.80 



JB43,296.33 



4.95 



1,233.75 



1.30 
.46} 

.581 



;i. 887. 675. 01 
I 424.721.22 



930,283.56 
ll, 080, 118. 45 



.90 A 

.90 

.35 



L29A 



1,090 
455,075} 
90,839| 



.381 
.28 A 



11.451 



•Jlr^a 

.02/, 
.051 



1,000 

856,827) 

449,919 

1.385 

831 

1,818; 

7,810 

88,100 

1,515,666^ 

1.571,870jb 

2.6U.838I 

3.962,119} 

193, 950 

2,467.7681 

i.&nl 

4,152 

853,777, 
4,104.041 

2,5r- 

899,696 
1S,876| 

3,285,560 
86.149 

530,275j 
416,1 
28,107i 
1.012 



292.00 ; 1,614| 
175.501.89 1,189,9644) 



619,018.47 

1,366.74 

403.20 



44.124.20 



18,7601 
1.174 

252.769) 
2,405 

287.016 



!75| 
iOO) 
i07| 



26,288.57 



5,281.50 
80,187.05 
21, 439. 69 



b8,829.10 

9,002.73 

546.00 

2, 170. 00 



210.566 

13.848 
5.002 
5,645) 
88.992) 

471 
110,981( 
17,0101 
811) 
194.365) 
26,010 
803,782 
51.552) 



|1 
|§ 
3 



$10,192.81 
21.015.00 
84,824.53 
1,273.55 
96,077.78 
17,908.72 

6oaoo 

1,874,077.51 

970,714.23 

5,542.00 

1,716.17 

6,793.25 

2,777.98 

9,069.75 

1,903.739.41 

764.89L01 

1.874.816.60 

2,177,185.29 

372,048.62 

2.234,407.80 

1,305.74 

1,009.20 

879,187.08 
6,428,t(L50 

5,530.29 
533,600.09 

9,159.80 

139.960.06 
10,784.04 

167. 699. 69 

238,800.27 

14.553.53 

098.28 

4S3.61 
489,829.64 
61,959.91 

1.761.40 

750.30 

1.603.65 

26,895.02 

5.441.00 

299,220.17 

24,192.40 

1.367.25 

59,629.30 

23,177.73 

38,374.85 

2,591.20 



a Binding. 

Respectfully submitted to the Qoartermast^r-G^eneral. 

ALEX. J. PERRY, 
Colonel, Quartermaster's Department. 



Quartermaster-General's Office, Second Division, 

October 21, 1865, 



UNION at;thobitie8. 



267 



4 



1 



X 

k 



J8? 



$420,074.95 
716,145.00 

625,965.00 
342,626.72 

2,765,100.00 


S : 
ii 


131.915 
162,500 

240,000 
190.640 

441,000 


§; 



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.mm 



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268 



COBBESPONDENCE, ETC. 




iflal 



^Am^s, 



UNION AUTHORITIES. 



269 



8SS8 

mi 



§ll§ 




S8S8 



§§§§ 



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270 



COBBBSPONDBVCE, ETC. 




88 SC: S9 &8 &S^8S&8SS88SeS8 388 388:1 

n a ii it muitumm %u tm 



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UmOK ADTHORITIES. 



271 



S8S8I3 SSSS!SS SSS f.S 3S 8S;!?S3;; SSSS S!!8!!38S8 S8S8 S3S 

imt mm tit u ^i mm t^u iimm ^m m 







272 



COBRESPONDENCB, ETC. 



S8S9SSsai883%!;SSS& 83S8S SS 8SS3 



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1 



V 



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VmOS AUTHOBITIB8. 



273 



yn |Ai»qng| g pro 

^« p»Jl1I^O«J1l 



pn poM^anid X^r 
'oa&Doo nqnma 



inqnmaiviox 



Si§8 U S§§-*2SS SS"! "&§S§ 



sn 8 



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274 



COBfiESPONDBXCE, STC. 



I 



4 

\ 



I 



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I 



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9 'oinuunqiw^s pm 

9« poin^ovjnnva 
pm poraqoind £n^ 
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UNION AUTHOSmEa 



275 



No. 9. 

MxmMff Haiemeni of elothmg reporUd on hamd at the variouB doihing depot9 

on Jvne SO^ 1S66, 



ArtlateofdottlBf. 



t 
I 



J 
I 



UnlfbimooKte: 

angt acw * 

Oraunoe 

ArtiUery 

Infuitry 

UBifonnJftckcU: 

CavJij 

ArtfllOTy 

iBflntry 

ZouftTe 

Knit 

iBTftUd Corps . 
Unifonn doaMn : 



8,916 

888 
8.711 

Bt,oeo 

40,984 
1,888 



8,841 

1,784 
89,896 
89,809 

79.981 
18.116 



1.000 



8.409 
88,884 



44,186 



18.486 

96,684 
«.«B8 



lB,886 
96,094 

8,408 
17,078 



8 

6b 948 

6,788 

1,678 
1,074 



6,100 

9.066 
781 

1.647 
6.819 



4.176 
4.908 

6.699 

8.664 



ZoBUve.. 

Knit 

OoitOB-daflktroiiMn . 

ZooATO Teste 

Ovsnllt. 

SUrto: 



8,188 

1,886 

86,407 
64,186 



88,708 

17.888 

77.488 



1,780 

888,116 
81.407 



8,646 

07,888 
81,788 



1.984 

88,918 

8,916 



17.174 
4,868 



878 
4,669 



n 



11.888 
88,468 

16 




Hon 
I for gTMilcoftto . 
filMkete: 
Wootan. 
Bnbbor oad pointed . 



6,410 
164,888 

88.918 

148,470 
17,644 

108,888 
46,179 
181.080 

888,741 
88,611 



888.088 

804,880 
64.800 



t.841 



8,780 
78,080 

89,854 
86,088 



16 
89,764 

18,808 
84,768 



88,910 

88.411 
7.444 



4.888 
8.409 



40,804 
46,600 



188,744 
71.871 
180.860 

108.886 



148, Ul 
48,788 
886,604 

811,746 
160.178 
116,719 



46^466 

88,410 
88.886 

88, lU 
86,947 
18.860 



84,007 
81,807 
141,866 

00,784 
01,018 
41,178 



11,480 
8,816 
10. m 

18,480 
8,008 
4,068 



88,788 
10.810 
00^410 

40.018 
17,907 
8,889 



7,»S 
6,881 
18,064 

19.188 
8,797 
9,488 



Beokooote: 

Lined.... 
UnUned. 
Knit 



800.884 

100^819 



178^416 



148,881 
166,680 



44,816 
44,107 



188 
18,898 



11.888 



Btoeks,! 

UnUbnabata: 



tTntrimmed. 
UnUbrm oopo.... 
iPorego 019* .... 
ZoooToeapo 



887,780 
98,068 
8,841 
711,086 
164,147 

10.871 



88,810 

8^066 

169.797 

99.007 

118.907 



818,791 
68.878 



88,114 
84,744 



816.797 
88,669 

41.988 



154 
186.788 



Bteblefiraoka. 



Oloreo 

Uittene 

Knepsaoka .. 
BaToroacka.. 
Centeeno .... 



83.114 
6. 618 



744 

118.898 

8.180 

44.065 

1.780 

872 



U4,406 
7.888 

7,007 
68,801 



866.888 

^807 

0,440 

40,090 

18,686 

48,808 



81,886 
4.166 



88,648 
80,086 

80,807 



11.070 
86.888 

46.869 
1,178 



6,867 
9tt 



18,747 
18.088 

18,808 

A887 

889 

68.666 

1,608 

8.001 



^614 



48.888 



86,481 



88.887 



84,446 



m 

8.090 
1,119 



9,010 
86 



9,680 
1.1? 



1,600 

■"'878* 



8.194 
1.061 



11,078 

1,186 

1.860 

186 



Brofcana . 
LMtherg 



rgaltora 

Waterpioot lilanketa: 



111,679 

111.744 

a6,740 

57.006 

1.084 



86.879 
88,807 
118.488 



88^884 
848,868 

40.101 
194,147 
11,888 



40.188 
66,987 
67.680 



1.8T7 

08.006 

8.888 

86,008 



88.618 
16.680 
18, 6U 



41.406 

87.066 
19,969 
9,747 



11,880 
9.819 
8.888 



116.948 
87.011 



276 



COBBBSPONDENCE, ETC. 



No. 9. — Monthly statement of clothing reported on hand at the various clothing 
depots on June SO^ 1866 — Continned. 



▲rticlM of clothing. 




I 


1 

a 


% 


I 


1 


1 


1 


rniformcoftta: 

Rnffin^wn* 






120 
67 
464 

944 

.!:5. 






OrdnEncD ■■■■....•.• 




,,. 










2 


Artillery 


8.218 
12,118 

9,848 
10,830 
8,185 














InfantiT 


181 

158 
42 


1,040 

1.118 

191 

2.246 


6,457 

8,924 

1.266 

86 


660 


14,847 


6,167 


TJniforiDiaoket*: 

Caralry..... r 


587 


Artillery 


688 


InfantxT 




Zouare 








KnH -.- 




51 

484 

436 
204 














Invalid Corps 


1,688 

48.785 
25.858 




426 

28,612 
1,859 


1:^ 


129 


6.476 
2,810 


400 


Uniform tronaera: 

Footmen 


5,868 
4.198 


8.529 


Hora4mi<ni ^ ■,-..., 


1.710 


Zoaave 




Knit 


















Cotton*daok tronaera 


















Zooave yeata 


















Oreralla 


2,604 
47.600 

55,668 
18,227 








20 
7,301 

9,657 








Drawera ..................... 


548 

021 
22 


2.462 
6.878 


20,850 
27,866 


6.360 
4.062 


11.523 
10.668 


4,027 


Shirto: 

Flannel 


4,475 


Knit 




ZoaavA irraT . ....... r 






:::::::::::::::: 






Greatooata: 

Footmen 


9.141 
8.855 
23.621 

80,147 
26,602 


382 

12 

8.635 

848 
930 
58 


5.750 

83 

1.142 

4,272 
1.958 


14.500 
930 

19,078 


12.189 
14.021 
60.797 

12.164 
7,903 


149 
19 

272 


5.176 
2,002 
10.060 

6,886 


8.332 


Horaemen 


1.367 


Strapa for greatcoato 

BlankeU: 

Woolen 


6,506 
8.246 


Rubber and painted 

Ponchoa 


<.u 




1,648 


T||]lQ||g ,., 












Sackooata: 

Lined 


23.076 
8.660 
752 
76,838 
44,520 
5,158 
08,332 
26.861 

6,962 


480 
475 


6,876 


10.827 
10,000 


20 
88 


868 
U6 


1.148 
6,038 


8,800 


Unlined 




Knit 






Booteea 


648 
136 


2,728 
141 


16,179 
1.853 


9,017 
8.152 


807 
52 


7.867 
2,355 


6.609 


Boota 


1.194 






Stockings 


1.866 




8,448 



789 


2,460 
22,373 

1.851 


873 


12,857 
8.085 

2.163 


7.079 


Stockn. leather 


5.170 
722 


2,296 


Uniform hata: 

Trimmed 


6 


17 


Untrimmed 






1.000 

17.022 

10 















Forage caps 


796 


6,828 17.991 


9,348 


68 


9,631 


8,272 


Zouave capa 




Cap covers 






15,717 

1,955 

174 

200 






7.650 

8.190 

81 




Stable ftocks 


1.006 
086 


32 
218 


77 
164 


4.697 
58 






8,140 


Saahea 


48 


Olovea 




Mittens 


166 
6.756 
26.706 
29.420 






10,967 
6,772 
7,643 

2.ni 








Knapsacka 


4,615 
4,041 
3,713 


12,190 
18,477 
20,860 


7.783 
6,485 
7,384 


""'ui' 


5,616 
6.641 
8.236 


8,923 


Ifaversacks^ ±^^. 


8,688 


Canteena 


8.584 


Brosana 




Leather gaitera 


















Waterproof blanketa: 

Horsemen 
















4S6 


Footmen 





































UNION AUTHORITIES. 



277 



No. 9.— JTcmiMy statement of clothing reported on hand at the various clothing 
depots on June SO^ i^85— Oonttnaed. 



AzUdlMofolotliliic 




J 

^ 


1 


1 

1 


1 
r 


i 
J 


1 


1 


% 


























13 


:::::::;:::::::: 




* '** 1 






ArtlllWT , 


168 

4,889 
4, ISO 
1.373 




2.366 
2,376 

4.770 
2,441 


166 
69 

13 
126 


:::::::::*::::* 




76 


InlkDW 


1.646 
218 


1.704 

2,450 
i;748 


7,742 

699 

80 


488 
291 


586 


UnifonDJacketo: 

CATairy 


111 


.ArtiDerT 


188 


Tnfkntrr 


2.284 


ZOWTO' • ■•••••>■'•.■.•'• 




\\\\\V.\""V.\. 




:::::::::::::: 






Knit r 


8,681 




8,986 
4.911 

9.260 
2,272 














iBTalldCorM 
















29.562 

R.900 


276 


11,757 


622 


700 


1 

227 


18,506 
6,384 


17 


HoTMNnMI.- 


181 


ZooATe 








KnU . . 








































2ff1iaTfl T98U ■•• •• 




















IW«wmn« 


808 

84.886 

86.462 


i'oM* 

9,287 


126 
12,106 

19.687 










12 
28.589 

18.729 
8,219 




Drawvn ..•••••...... 


426 
6.180 


""to 


1.400 
1,708 


1,249 

606 
466 


878 


Slilrto: 


290 


Knil 


61 


ZoQATB. oraT 












GrMtfloatoi 

Footmen ......x,.-r-T 


61,716 
8,260 
10.286 

6.789 

721 

2,606 


1,008 
'i;749* 
7,386 


8,659 
21474 

14,341 

11.213 


2.668 

2.717 
2,691 

8.704 
9,368 
7.506 


40 
106 
819 

876 

810 

15 


3.689 

626 

36 

1,042 


'""40* 
98 


13,142 

7,488 

6 

26,060 


89 


HorMiiMii 


268 


Strmim for oriMtMHito 


1,207 

4,166 
679 


WOOl«B r 


Poaches ZTT.. 


66 






TahoM 






SMkooAta: 

LliMd » 


1.667 


7,202 
4,960 


3,270 
2.843 


*i,'42i" 


1,066 
682 


617 
666 


ii'Si' 


41 


TTnlined 


274 


F»Hr 




pootoca 


68,794 
8,409 


8,642 
819 


12,662 
2,336 


27.647 
6,849 


83 
167 


18,889 
640 


279 
456 


47.624 
12.677 


2,706 
464 


Boou 


Lcfffffam. ...r, 




SSffiS:::::::.:::::::..:.. 


22,877 
9,010 

286 


2,486 
914 

1,974 


28,071 
9,510 

12,621 


12,824 
2,374 

13.771 


""97* 


2,400 
1.218 

2.461 


1.133 
168 


18.740 
6,264 

28.178 


618 


<^^t, HWthfir 


102 


Unifocmhato: 

TiimsMd 


87 


UntiliDmad 




Uniform Moa 




















Toraff* oana ••• 


6,606 


4,171 


12,690 


9,109 


82 


6,784 




248 


110 


ZooaTftoam. ..•.'* -r .^^r t 




o!^wm:..v:...:...::::.:. 


79 






14,976 
127 
208 


•— 20* 
14 


1,000 

1,400 

18 








StaUefrooka 


'"lie' 


2,994 
115 




607 


156 


Saabea 




OloTca 






Mitt4naw..rrr. 












1,986 
1.866 
1.899 
2,000 


"*i76* 
^69 
260 


233 
2.783 
19.620 
17.516 




Knanaaoka 


14,571 
13,946 
7,074 


13,298 
11,820 
8.076 


17,484 
20,872 
16,463 


9,647 
27,142 


21 
462 

10 


66 


HtTfiraaaka .. 


84 


Oant4MMM 


192 


Hrofana... 




T.Mtii«r cait«rt - 




















Waterproof blanketo: 
















6.600 
7,859 




Footmen 





































278 



CORBESPOKDENGE, ETC. 



Ko. 9.— IfotiiUy HatemetU ofcloOUng reported on hand at the various clothing 
depots on June SO, i^«5— Continiied. 



ArttdMofelottiJBg. 


1 


! 


1 


} 


( 


1 




^ 


JEngtiiMnV - 












1,129 




18,618 








4 

74 

7.280 








2,301 


^Artillery 










1,026 
926 

2,808 
2.066 


"ii'dii* 


85,634 


Tnt^pt-ry 


819 


1.009 
200 


2,261 

680 
282 


1.711 

1,885 
600 
866 


860,658 


Uniform Jaoketo: 


897,089 
131.090 


2?^S;"::::;::::::::::: 




4 


InftotrT 






7^686 


ZOOttTO ..........TTT-.... 












8 


1,868 


KDlt..r.rr--T 












24 


14.929 
62,786 


IhralidCofiw 












600 

8,068 
8,089 


Uniform tronsen : 

ypotin^ffi ....,,....,,,,.T 


152 
88 


1,846 
800 


«^S 


640 
814 


8,456 

061 


6,117 


828,768 




86L509 


ZOQATO .«»....r..»T1T T 


S 


TCnH 


































ZoUftTOTMto .............r.r 


















OyeraUs 












2.828 
9,206 

11,042 
2,009 


10,641 


83,610 


Drft wen ■••••• 


187 
87 


1,288 
1,811 


9,078 
10,647 


972 
1.116 


8,864 


1,166,541 


Bhirto: 

Flaanfll..... 


1.130.488 
894.126 


KnH—r,-- 


ZODATO. ffniT .»^-»-»..TT- 












17,687 


Footmm 


U 


09 
809 
921 

475 


0,428 
2:207 
18,722 

9.264 

7.865* 
1.789 


2,866 
444 

1,175 

648 
626 
103 


677 

6,842 

1,138 

610 


2,636 
2.681 
6.918 

4.603 
18,431 
1,500 


820 
8.066 

1,041 


651,564 


HoTMrnon > 


278.161 


Btimpo forgTMitooats 




949.283 

1.009.106 
884,976 




816 




Ponohoo 








210,005 


TlllmMr,rTT. -r-r.r.r 








SMkooate: 

Lined 


404 


120 
99 


8.098 
186 


622 


117 
1,883 


6,830 
7.688 


4.106 


761,644 


Unltned 


680,645 


KnH 






81.870 
1 500.679 


Bootees 


882 
100 


1,809 
800 


u.^ 


6,476 
468 
998 

8,686 
789 


8,026 
1,616 


1,479 
7,851 


4,877 
2.800 


Booto 


iS^082 


l^ggingm ,,,, ^^^,-,-^ 


SB.' 461 


St^MKUCS 


859 


1,546 
i;907 

1.163 


272 


6.761 
4.442 

1,691 


33, m 
13.768 

6,602 


6.063 
7.486 

6,044 


386.998 

839,394 
68.201 




Uniform hftts: 
Trimmed .T,,r 




Untcimmed 




Uniform oape 
















83.096 


Fontffo oftne 


800 


2.219 


10.130 


1,179 


2 


18,079 


6,471 


880,248 

8.575 

164.987 

188.070 

2U0 


Zonnve onps 


Cftpoorers.... 








2.810 

677 

8 


8.877 
183 
89 


64 

2.140 

210 


6,000 


Btoblefrockn 








Saahe« 




8 


06 


48 


Qloyee 




mttenii , 






6,810 
6.247 
5,286 
8.190 










47, 313 


ICnftpenoke 




899 

188 
661 


8,684 
2.860 
2.880 


1,889 
1.488 
8.406 


11,342 
6.464 
4.806 


4,886 
6.082 
4.850 


868,578 
622.821 


Hft^'OFiwoks 


900 
900 


Canteens 


845,209 


Brogane 


70,393 


















2,064 


Wntenpnofblnnketa: 

Horaenien 
















122.198 


Footmen 














$880 

















UNION AUTHORITIES. 
No. 10. 



279 



Monthiif Bt<tiement of camp and ffarriaon equipage reported on hand at the varU 
0U8 clothing depots on June SO, X8S6. 



Articlea of eqnlpaips. 



t 
I 



SiU^toDts 

ComiDfln tentB 

Slieltor tente 

Frtmoni and Bell tent« . 

T«DtttOTM 

TVwIiTka, Mingle 

Bedaaeka, double 

ICoMoitobars 

Boglmontal oolora 

Canpoolora 

National colon 

Standarda. 

Storm i 

Oarrlaon 1 

BeernitiBg] 

Gnldona.. 

Piekaxea. 

Axea. 



iflan 

aon flan.... 
litiBgflaga. 



iooyela 

Hateheta 

Heaa-pana 

Ironpota ■ 

Camp-kettlea 

»««&.. 

Tnuapeta ~ 

Drama........ 

Fifea 

Goneral-hoapdtal flaga 

Poat and field flaga 

Amlralance flaga 

Uoaqaito neta (pieoea) 

Booka: 

Company order 

Oompany dothing ac- 
ooont 

Company daaoripttva . ... 

Companvmomingreport. 

Poat order 

Poat morning report 

Poat letter 

Poat guard 

Segimentalgeneral order . 

Begfanental letter 

Begimental deacriptive. . 

B^fanMitallndex 

Begimental order 

Target Practice 

ConaoUdated morning re- 
port. 

loapeotora* report booka. 

Brigade letter booka 

Brigade letten-reoeiyed 
bSoka. 

Brigade order booka .... . 



Brigade 
In&rw 



4,396 



80,fl63 



8,074 

es,64a 

8.006 

20. 575 

201 

8,420 

204 

440 

74 

62 

1.086 

446 

23.630 

17.041 

21,072 

864 

81,410 

80,618 

371 

17,260 

346 

402 

1,816 

2,076 

47 

62 



38,104 

1.011 
1,800 

1.837 
2.661 
961 
036 
880 
634 
643 
803 
310 
488 
253 
1.053 



random booka. 



818 

8.677 
152,041 



2,016 

1.868 

26,602 

0,511 

100 

448 

87 

108 

186 

00 

802 

231 

7,200 

16,216 

8,786 

8,604 

18.812 

80,742 

710 

28,264 

67 

720 

1,688 

2,007 

48 

200 



1.876 

8.710 

2 

826 

124,241 

80 

46 



170 

1,602 

126 

686 

76 

86 

282 

221 

14.146 

8,046 

1«,264 

12,740 

10.452 

76,168 



26,621 
441 

880 
651 

1,166 

128 

1 

1,628 



T7I 

80 

1.088 

62,206 

808 

12,076 

4,048 

10,472 

78 

182 

46 

40 

15 

28 

88 

418 

10.060 

4,208 

12.047 

8,804 

9,806 

24.612 

16 

4,806 

1,886 

748 

801 

1.684 



4 

89 
7,660 
16,794 



2,675 



62 

680 

8 

470 

80,187 



887 

220 

26 

4.166 

10,800 



066 
8.467 
4,666 

27 

6 

646 

7 

23 

66 

62 

18 

6 

18,606 

21,065 

17.043 

7.106 

13,025 

22,810 

107 

611 

802 

67 

42 

683 

41 

146 

150 



1,661 
1,646 



8,486 

2,838 

15,622 

17 

238 

10 



17 

3 

60 

26 

2.686 

1,863 

8,415 

462 

1,208 

4,403 



80 
13 
106 
886 
1.130 
66 



126 
360 
17 
138 



208 

2.907 

18,640 

226 

2,462 

66 

80 

52 

830 

60 

100 



055 
200 

440 

682 

8,100 

8.506 

8,000 

2,026 

264 

8 

6 

244 

07 

42 



2.660 
2,515 

2,563 

2,764 

1,011 

1,036 

1,364 

608 

216 

474 

493 

882 

160 

440 



465 

472 

448 
468 
70 
67 
83 
117 

eo 

62 
65 
66 

64 



205 
814 

262 
841 
165 
224 
220 

45 
103 
220 
141 
212 
107 

50 



620 
957 

867 
964 
607 
621 
644 
563 
83 
00 
153 
90 
77 
46 



106 
103 



254 

714 
185 



17 

31 

11 

24 

10 



15 

67 

1,100 

2,136 

1,067 

1,101 

2,026 

6,p69 



1,827 
237 
176 
143 
248 
27 
83 
76 



163 



904 

218 
115 
103 
104 
166 
120 
101 
132 
170 
226 
60 



280 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. 

Ko. lO.'-Monthly statement of eamp and garriaon 
the various dotJung dqpots on June SO, 



on handat 



ArtldM of equ^Age. 



I 



H 



a 



I 



I 






lyiteiit*. 



170 



OtnominitAiitt,.,. 

8bdt«r tentu 

Frtmontaiid BoU tenU. 

TintclATM 

Bid«Hk«,glactA. 

B«4i*Ak%d<ralti«-. 

Kcnqnlto b*n-.. 

HegJioKiii tal cvlura 

Cjunp colfiTfi^ 

Kmtioiwl oolum... 



2,451 
11,104 



85 

179 
2 

2,14B 
2,848 



800 
1,124 
1,084 

100 



101 



8toTra Aun^.... 

GmrriHni nmmt , , »* 

BeeruUfDf nugt 

Qtild^DA Hi* ^ .., ^ . , ^ 

Pickiiiw , 

AZM 

SmdM 

Bmrrels 

Hatoheto 

liesa-iMiia 

Ironpota 

Camp>ketUet 

BagiM 

TrwnpeU 

Dranu 

Fife* 

Gtoneral-hospiUl ilagi 

Post and fleld flufs 

AmbnlaDoe flaea 

HoaqaitonetaCpiaoes) 

Books: 

Company order 

Company clotbing ao- 
oonnt 

Company deaorlptiTe . . . 

Company morning report 

Poat order 

Poat morning report. . 

Poat letter 

Poat guard 

Regimen talceneral order. 

Regimental letter 

Regimental deacriptlTe. . 

Regimental Index 

Regimental order 

TarjgetPraoUoe 

ConaoUdated momlngre- 
port. 

Inspeetora* report books. 

Brigade letter books 

Brigade lettera^recetred 
books. 

Brigade order books 

Indorsement and memo- 
landnm books. 



67 

58 

17 

28 

2,542 

1,048 

1,558 

2,200 

5,584 

12,826 

57 

2,452 

58 

47 

00 

713 

4 

18 



821 
838 
83 
81 
71 
188 
106 
100 
180 
121 
107 



829 
202 

70 



48 
858 

1 

496 

11«205 

88 

875 



16 
876 



867 



6 

80 

6 

4 

4 

5 

6 

18 

66 

162 

175 

259 

489 

GOO 



227 
288 

75 
1,714 

25, rs 

6 

629 

15,418 

1,082 

68 

9 

44 

6 



4 

2,985 

556 

2,682 
112 
644 

7,960 



1,749 

644 

828 

161 

1,840 

1,101 



121 
50 
19 
51 
84 
8 



8,007 
82 



107 
865 



10 

128 

147 

4 

8 



SO 

21 

81 

8 

2,888 

8,257 

2,871 

1,480 

2,747 

8,541 

25 

1,859 

91 

199 

94 

29 

18 

80 

200 



184 
82 

162 
117 
43 
28 
40 
10 
20 
48 
31 
58 
58 



2 

12 



6,633 



a 

4.288 

902 



2 
52 

2 



16 



2 
661 
254 

816 



4 
16 



848 
5,100 



2,061 
7 
9 
17 
20 
4 



1,270 



501 
11 



15 
42 



80 

a 

42 

87 
5 



UNION AUTH0BITIB8. 

No. 10. — Monthly ttatement of camp and garriaon ^ , 
the various clothing d^ts on June SO, H 



281 

on hatidai 



AxtiolM of eqnipKS- 


! 




1 


i 

1 


10 
86 


t 
1 


S 


1 


^ 




MO 


6* 


40 

608 

5 

258 

6.556 


186 
93 




7 
1 


""iii" 


6 


▼•fl-tOBtll.. ....... 


181 


MUftT tmita 








806 
0,901 
S» 
26 
7M 


5 
868 


887 
9.285 


85 
262 


""iw 


461 


1,668 

818,981 

1 

46 

89 

81 

86 

7 

47 

6 

88 

10 

1 

9 

66 

1,868 

1.878 

1.888 

3.480 

IS 


686 


Sbfthv tint* 


810 


Vt«noBt and Bell teoto 




TlaatstoTva 


"'ioi' 

814 


571 
1,008 
1.026 


488 
1,662 










FMiMTln ■ingk ... 




870 
667 


"'"n 

108 

a 

a' 


90 






XoMmitobttn 








267 


Sef&eotal eolon 


6 
8 
16 


18 
74 
16 
8 

a' 

....... 

*i'947* 
1,911 


28 
295 
27 

4 
189 

74 

86 
19 

2,874 

5,870 

80 

!.«. 

70 
85 
110 


io" 

4 

8 
88 

1,606 
1,880 
1,751 
686 
2.206 

886 
40 
150 

""*884' 

74 


6 
84 

7 
5 
8 
8 


4 




Onp OOlOTB 








mmdATila , 




BtniBllan 


18 


1 
3 


a 
a 


6 


QiRteonlljMa 


3 


Rfcnilthiff flftn 


19 

80 

8.071 




QvidoiM 












45 

88 
17 

850 
80 

120 


488 
167 
846 

"■*6i6* 
884 


6 
106 

810 
41 
91 

808 


98 


AXM 


184 


fteftdM 


8,848 


888 


sEStSUvv .VI. , I 




Hatcheto 


548 
18.888 


l.^ 


177 


SSf!mmi 


788 


SoKSS:. 1 




SSpJketttoi :::::.:..:..:::: 


168 
84 


»'1S 

88 

72 


177 
28 
9 

8 
86 


167 

89* 

48 

8 


60 
6 

4 
7 
17 


70 
184 
154 

16 
7 


870 


BofflM 


9 


Trmnpete 




DnraM 


16 


f% 


nfes 




Post uid Held llagiKT. 


28 


















AmbnlMioe flftgsT 


















HoMnitonetaiDtooM) 





















Books: 


884 

287 
846 
224 


91 
88 

84 
55 


79 
90 

n 

117 


69 
81 
114 
50 
15 
17 
15 
18 
84 
28 
17 
17 
21 
5 


J 

10 
7 
27 
86 
86 
44 

a 
11 

1 
1 

86 


11 
81 
18 
17 
7 
7 
10 
8 


i' 

4 

1 


18 
19 

as 

6 


480 

480 

460 

584 

6 

6 

2 


4 


OonpanydeMriiSiTe..... 
Conprary morning ropoit. 


1 
1 
1 

2 


Post morning Toport 

Post letter .r...rr. 


86 












3 


Poatfnmrd 

Befimentftl letter 

Bflglmentf J dewariptiTe .. 

BeglmentA] index 

BegimentAl order 


85 

86 
58 
45 
81 
54 


2 

5 
10 

9 
11 

7 


o' 

18 
19 
8 
18 




6 
8 

11 
10 
9 


106 
77 

179 
111 
47 




OofneoBdated morning re- 
port. 
Inepectore* report booka . 




'.'.'.'.'.'.'. 






" * * 1 














' 






Brinde letter iMoke 












, 






Brigade lettera-reoelTed 

booka. 
Brigade order booka 












I-. 






1 


















x:::..: 
















randnm booka. 


I 

















282 



C0BRE8P0NDENCE, £TC. 



No. 10. — MonMy statement of eamp and garriaon ^ 
the various dothtng de^ts on June SO, 18 



lonhandat 



ArttolMofeqiiipage. 


^ 


1 


1 


1 


I 


1 


, 


1 

s 


Horaltalteati 






25 
82 






10 

1 
2,874 
4.897 


2 

81 

**"*i85' 
856 


6.121 

15^678 

340 


^^Snff!.:.:;.::;.::..:::: 






8 


28 


SlblsytaBto 














228 
8,069 


••IS 


53,908 








8,788 


IMmootMidBell tenta 






TsntttoTM 






SO 
27 
987 




■*"492" 
80 


500 


8 

274 

"645* 


"278* 

4* 

13 

4 

5* 


11.688 

116. 8IS 
50,223 


Bedsaekt, tinffle 




150 


Bednankai donVlA 




Hoaaaitoban 












7 

re 

7 

2 

2 

1 

8 

2 

1,288 

1.402 

1,405 

61 

1,191 

8;882 


1 
9 
2 










57 


13 


''S 
















6 

21 
6 


1,284 
748 


RWmiflan 






5 
1 

19 
19 
285 
96 
128 

""iTO 
1,440 




OftrrlwMiflaff* 




:::;:::: 


487 


Bdornltlnffliin 






3.108 

2,039 

103.228 

98.548 

105,132 

47.381 

1U,247 

864.006 

1.678 

106.417 

8,893 

8.869 

6.865 

11.747 

611 


SS^S^^^y^..:::::^ 






"i,'»7* 
260 
500 
18 
498 
2,849 


19 
979 

170 


"mo' 

296 
606 


PiokszM 


12 

7 
7 


190 
255 

98 


Azw 


SlwdM 


bEotS".:.::::::::::::::::: 


Hllt^lMrtff „ 


34 


188 
229 


716 
8,925 


809 
3,279 


ViMM-panii 


Iron pots 




CMni>-kett]M 




71 
7 


1,161 


693 
18 


827 
2 
3 
29 

77 
2 


Tf 
47 
6 
80 


1,106 

9 

2 

80 

61 


S!X :r^.;:::::::;::: 




Tmmpeto 




Drams, 




6 
4 


63 

102 

4 

6 


22 
21 


Fifes 








pSt^flffdfliff?!?:::::::: 










951 


Ambalsnos flsgsT. 














2.887 
88,164 

8^858 
8,571 

a658 
8,748 
6.256 
6.829 
6.511 
4,647 
1.772 
1,701 
1,848 
2,160 
1,521 
2,708 


Kosqnito netsTpieoes) 
















Books: 

Compsay order 




10 
10 

10 
10 


30 
35 

81 
35 


80 

12 

13 
13 


58 

73 

M 


18 
85 

49 

r 

50 
50 
50 
105 
14 
20 
11 
13 
13 
62 


37 
40 

38 
38 

4' 

1 
1 
3 

3* 


Company clothing so- 

oonnt. 
Company doscriptlTa .... 






Compsny morning report 


















Post letter...... ^7 






1 
8 

6* 

7 
6 

4 






Fostgonid 




1 
1 






Begimental cenersl order 




1 
18 










1 
1 
1 






24 
20 








Tsivet PraoUoe 




port. 




























Brigade let! er books 












9 

8 

10 
6 




207 


books. 

Brigade Older books 












198 












128 


Ih^rsement and memo- 












121 


nndom books. 















Bespectfnlly submitted to the Qnartermaster-Gtoneral. 

ALEX. J. PERRY, 
Colonel, Quartermaster'e Department, 

Quabtebmasteb-Genbral^s Officb, Second Division, 

October 21, 1866, 



UNION AUTHORITIES. 



283 



No. 11. 

statement shomng^ the aqgrtaate eaependUure for the purchaee of clothing, equi- 
page, and maieriai during theflaoat year ending June SO, 1866, at the purchasing 
dipote at New York, Philadelphia, and Cfineinnati. 





PbUiidelphlA. 


New York. 


Clnolimati. 


ToteL 


Clothing 


$30,287,473.96 
7,992, 26&.» 
14,878,46121 


«28,840,<M0.42 

8,105,147.20 

976.20 


126.448.767.83 
2.417. 902. 24 
6.787,878.43 


$70,087,282.90 
13.515,806.09 
21,416,818.84 


Sasaa*:::::::::::::;::::::::::::;. 




Total , 


42.968,198.82 


20,446,163.82 


35,606,048.49 


100,019,406.18 





Bespectfnlly submitted to the Qnartermaster-G^eneral. 

ALEX. J. PEBRY, 
Colonel, Quartermaster's Department. 

QUARTERMASTKRrGKNERAL'S OFFICE, SECOND DlYIBION, 

October ei, 1865. 
No. 12. 



Statement showing the 



g the quantity of material purchased at the depots at New York, 
Philadelphia, and Cincinnati since May, 1861. 



ArtidM. 



Philadel- 
phia. 



New York. 



CiBoinnati. 



Total. 



WwtUio cldthii and keracTti 

I darkblne cloth (uuifDrm cckat) yards. 

I d*rlc-blii« cidtli (iiulform coal},. do... 

I dark -h\ no cUi th ( foraga up \ ,,.. do. . . 

CsBlFen (o4?rflriiig) . ,* ,,. ...do... 

1 Rkj'LIuakftrMJ - - .*.... do... 

»ky-biuekefHj ,,., ....,,.,.-. do... 

[ dArk-bluakersQj.*,,,,., do... 

idhrk-blueksneey.^..,,.......,,,..,,.^ do... 

jencii fWitng-d^th '.,......,.-......... ....do... 

I thj^blne l^faf ^lotti .. . ,..«^.«,.. do. 

\ ftky-blDC! facioff-flJoih . _hl. ....... .—..... ...do. 

Ln^alarclolh............. ^...do. 

CqHobi 

HoapllaJ l«Dti, SO-Iscb . 22^otmp«. . , . . . .do. . . 

Haajpilal-t«iit ni«4« 30'kich, 15|-DUEi«a do... 

Wall and Sibkv^ lenus S^-lucli, l&-Qiiticse....do... 

WflJI-tatit*, *Ai^itit:h, \'Si tniiic©.... ..^....do... 

Wall ■ tfiut ll}«*, 2^ incli , lU-dQiiDQ. do. . . 

L'omiDc^Ei t<^Dt«. 22 Jiich, n-onQce **.+**. .....do... 

ComDicjD t«i]td, 22-Juc:li^ 1^-Daac« ..,,., ._in....do. .. 

T«ut frilb and biili!!^, ^i^i-iuchn g-outiro do... 

Tifibt £rllia and balio^', :;j'J-iui::k^ Ii^-oaanu,... do... 
nanaels: 

I Canton flannel do... 

Gn^ do... 

ibloe do... 

I Une wool (aaok coat) do... 

iblaawool(aackooat> do... 

Black aileatn do... 

Moslin twills and conetjeana do... 

imoalin twills, unbleached do... 
cotton drilling do... 
cotton drilUnff .....do... 

UotUm, sewing, spools nnmber. 

Basal* sheeting yards. 

Alpaca do... 

fiVownUnen do... 

Canras padding do... 

LintwCT do... 

Webbtaig, ooUon, l*ineh do... 

Tape * pieces. 

Webbing, cotton, l|-inch yards. 

Flax, bagging do... 

PisteboKd pounds. 



588,496 

1,630,889 

4,820 

109^487 

772,841 

11,760,168 

60,736 

450,626 

929 

8.028 

12,405 

90 

880,255 

11,265 



152,155 



184,588 
14,516 
46,722 
21.092 
8,111 

3,220,219 

4.818,994 

883,960 

310,886 

2.662,119 

887.992 

6,834 

2,029,747 

2,805,100 

281.789 

413.448 

100,057 

197,873 

146,803 

896,903 

8,720,104 



188,607 
20,118 
6,006 
5,785 



890,000 
166,000 
28,250 



188.000 
802.000 
884,000 
25,000 



10,100 



1,061,250 
680 
680.510 
770,249 
139,700 
257, 117 
78,500 



822.516 



1.508,948 



893,784 
3,845,409 



200.162 



2,312,510 
2,414,648 



1,094,776 



261,316 



600,000 




16.900 


498,500 


19.000 


2,167 
72,248 
78,278 






8,000 
128,000 


20.160 
14,400 
40,820 











1,701.012 

1,796,889 

28,070 

100,487 

910,841 

14,066,111 

944,786 

484.826 

929 

8,028 

22,505 

90 

830,255 

11.265 
25,022 
152,155 
893.784 
4,029,997 
13,516 
46.722 
221,254 
8,111 

5,532,729 

8,314,892 

334.649 

991,396 

4.427.041 

477.693 

263.458 

2,369,569 

2.995,100 

231,780 

923,848 

109.057 

219,040 

118,546 

675,181 

2,720,104 

28,160 

826,007 



6,086 
5.786 



284 



CORBEBPONDENCE, ETC. 



Ko. t2,^Statement showing the quantity ofmaUrial purehaaed 
New York, PhUadaphia, and Cincinnati Hnee May, 1861-^ 



at the depots at 



AxtlolM. 



Phfljide!. 
phla. 



New York. 



ToUL 



Bimtizkfft 



SSf... 

White. 
BIiw.. 



.pli 



Wonted laoe: 



li-lneh 

Hnoh. 

i-iiioh.< 

SaklM*. |1 



imk,Mwing, 
BttrUiM.... 



do... 
do... 

.ytidt. 
...do... 
...do... 
...do... 



Stendarddrilla 

Luster 

Throod 

Battona: 

Co»t 

V«t 

Shirt 

ScMpender 

AUUnds 

BacklM: 

f-inoh, roller 

i-inoh, roller 

1-inch, roller 

U-ioch, rolkr 

FUx Mwing twine 

Hooke and eyes 

Baling rope 

Cotton twine 

Flag thimbles 

Chin-strap slides 

Leather: 

Bneksklns 

Sheep, moroooo, skins. . . 

Black, bridle 

Bosset, bridle 

Wax. upper 

Sole 

Welt 

Stock 

Visor 

Chinstrana 

Split, for Knapsacks 

Cap leatiiers, complete 

Tentbnttons 

line, large 

twine, cotton, sewing . 



...yards.. 
....do... 
....do... 
.pounds.. 



1,788 

1,546 

787 

800.668 
1,844.768 
i. 672, 206 
78,562 
42,644 
271,540 



10,000 
17,000 
8,000 



160,100 

800,000 

1,018,860 



6.000 
6,000 



"do. 



..do.. 
..do.. 



180,871 

88,825 
148,601 
228,601 
106.067 



111.806 

8,011,797 

8.627 

13,427 



28,660 
16,670 
88,850 
88,350 



20.766 
18,212 
10,060 
21,068 



do... 

do... 

do... 

do... 

..pounds. 

gross. 

..pounds. 

..rr.do... 

do... 

.number. 



....do... 
...sides. 
....do... 
....do... 

feet. 

.pounds. 

do... 

....sides. 

feet. 

....do... 
. .pounds. 



13,040 
8.531 
2,241 
4.806 
2,828 
25,184 
40,681 



1,051 
8,186 



, .number. 
..pounds. 
..fT.do... 



8.526 
222,180 

2. 117 

8,247 

16,081 

2,500 

520,875 

1,805,082 

158,268 

652 

18,872 

8.857 

24.058 

41.063 

2.442,056 

40,804 

16,000 



80,670 



1,003,200 



20,788 

18,646 

8,788 

440,768 

2,144.708 

6,600,565 

78.602 

48.644 

880,845 

8,011.787 

8,527 

208,206 

112,476 
105,026 
276.163 
248,497 
21,068 

13,640 
8,531 
2,241 
4.M6 

8,874 
41,220 
40,631 
30.670 

8,526 
222,180 

2^117 

8,247 

16,081 

2,590 

520,875 

1,806,082 

166,203 

652 

18,872 

8,857 

24.068 

41,063 

4,846.256 

40,804 

16.000 



Respectfully sabmitted to the QaartermasteT-General. 

ALEX. J. PERRY, 
CoUmel, Quartermaster's JD^aartment, 

Quartebmasteb-General's Office, Second Division, 

October tl, 18S6. 

No. 13. 

Statement showing the number of the principal articles of clothing and equipage 
purchased ai the depots of Philadelphia, New York, and CHncinnati since May, 
1861. 

(KoTB.— This statement Indudea only articles purchased already made up. It is ezdualTe of the arti- 
dee manuHiotured ttom material purchased, for which see BtatemOBt Ko. 6.) 



Articles. 


Philadel. 
phia. 


KewTork. 


Giaetenati. 


Total. 




048,004 

501.125 

2,898,772 

607,907 

8,844 

5,001 


667,000 

343,400 

2,105,674 

658,420 


845,828 

160,646 

1,473.008 

527.829 


1.881,727 
1.104.161 
6,06&O40 
1,688,746 
8,844 
SLOOl 


Jackete 


trousers, foot • 


trousers, horse 


Yesto 


Oreralls 


M,'666 





UNION AUTHORITIES. 



285 



No. IB.'^Statement thawing the number of tfie principal artides of dothinp andk 
equipage purduued at tne depote of PnOaduphiaf New Yorkf and Cinemnati 
since May, i^i— Oontinned. 



Artielaa. 



Phfladel. 



KawTOTk. 



Ttttai. 



Shiru 

Gnfttooat*: 
Foot.... 



Il2&£r«~«~^ 

Woolen , 

Bobbor and pointed 

Poreboo nbbor end pointed.. 

Taluee 

Seek coots: 



UnUned. 
Kni* 



Pegged. 



Sewed. 

pegged. 

nga. 



Stecko.1 
Uniiramhote. 
cope. 
FoB igocep e.. 
Graeoren. ... 
Bteblefrocka. 



Oloreo 

Mittene 

Knepeoeke.. 
HoTenaeka. 



flocpltoltente. 

Wea-tente 

atU^jtente... 
OommoB tents . 
Shelter tento.. 

BeUtento 

Tentetoree.. 



eingle 
donble. 



lioeqnltobon. 
Begunental oolore . 

Campooloro 

Vetioool oolore ... . 



Stonnfloj 

OaniooB 

Beeroiting 

Guidons. 

Piekazee 

Axes 



flecB... 
Bg flags. 



Spedee.. 
Shorele.. 



Batcbete 

Mees-peue 

Ironpote 

Camp-kettles 

Bnglee 

Trampete 

Drnma 

FIfoe 

Homital flags: 

Poet and fleidll'/.Iir.IIIII.' 

AmbolaBoe flags 

Books; ^^ 

CoinpoDyorder 

Company fflotbing ......... 

Conpany deecriptlTe 

Company morning report. . 

Post oroer •. 

Pioet momliigTCport 



4.607,800 
4.Stt.fl66 

i,oa.2Si 

437.886 
1,706,758 

1.090.802 
800.807 

682. yro 

26,461 

1,081.188 
SM.461 



8,381,647 



608,016 



146,188 
7.801,640 

276.864 

701.666 

6.287 

2,168.622 

100. 148 



18.618 

74.670 

86.676 

1,208.637 

1,714,319 

1. 078, 787 

16,243 

88.641 

21,672 

128.037 

086,826 



24,777 

88.748 

48.275 

0,680 

765 

1.818 

880 

286 

306 

25 

867 

4.180 

70,448 

276,005 

107,010 

68.887 

187.760 

446,642 

1.306 

232,666 

8.717 

8,288 

18,164 

16,588 

261 

686 

2,600 

12,414 
14,002 
14,848 
18.811 
1,804 
2.000 



8.406.800 
4,881,684 

1,068.600 
818,300 



2,880,068 

728.700 

264,626 

6.258 

1.460.000 
842.160 
680,144 

2,788.800 



124,080 

568.682 

841,800 
27,000 
7.420.586 
419.000 
880.618 



1.644,280 
884.200 
108,000 



22.080 

1,480,810 

1,841.400 

1.008,200 

7.606 

28.626 

16.000 

124,808 



19,600 

147,000 

80.000 

124.000 

1,021 

7,800 

917 

226 

780 

667 

2.670 

4.561 

114,010 

188.000 

121.700 

28,881 

135.888 

298,800 

1,700 

141.000 

7,700 

4,610 

13,840 

12,420 

101 
201 

401 

16.660 
17.200 
16.060 
16.460 
8.000 
8.000 



2.682,166 
2.860,340 

on. 661 
878.886 
886,630 

1.600.104 

210.000 

800,766 

8,000 

1,186,616 
872,868 



80.780 
1,886,460 



781,168 

6,160 

4.808.764 

60.560 

682,840 



868.286 
180,243 
46.000 

6,000 



92,000 

044,887 

1.008,888 

1,817.567 

1.265 

2.783 

165 

3.142 

384,140 

1,287 

1.175 



664 

1.602 

500 



180 
600 

1,476 
68,682 

130.268 
84,879 
60.636 
70. 174 

281,422 



162,648 
4.010 
2,010 
4.602 

4,687 



1.760 

8,631 
8,629 
8,681 
8.681 
1,161 
1,818 



10.788.866 
11,001,680 

1,806,610 
1.088,681 
2,104.288 

5.810,060 

1.888.007 

1.006,660 

84.710 

3.686.786 

1,800.270 

080,144 

6.062.207 

2,180,880 

186.680 

1.468.648 

1.073,008 

177.807 

20,819.886 

746,814 

2,347.504 

16,788 

4.766,100 

674,686 

164.000 

26.717 

74.570 

200,076 

8.688,824 

4,664.606 

6,200,614 

26.118 

70.040 

86,836 

256,047 

2,100,806 

1.287 

45,468 

170.748 

70. r 5 

183,586 

2,860 

11,121 

2,807 

1,211 

1.497 

762 

8.627 

10.216 

256,280 

666,868 

813,889 

148,864 

843,328 

1,026,204 

8,006 

686,208 

21,427 

14,858 

87,486 

82,640 

662 
890 

4,661 

37,706 
40,521 
39.940 
38.402 
6.146 
6,818 



286 



C0RBE8P0NDENCE, ETC. 



'Ko. 18. — St(Uement shawina the number of 
equipaae purehcued at the depoU of Ph 
since May, i^tfi— Oontinned. 



the principal artieiea ofdothing and 
ladeljpfcfa, New York, and Cinannati 



ArtiolM. 



Phlladd. 
phia. 



New York. 



Ctnoinnatt. 



Total. 



Books— Cootia ae^. 

Pool letter 

PootgnarA 

Begimentali 

Begimental I 

Begimental deocilptiTo. . 

Beglmontal index 

Begfanontol order 

Target Praotioe 

ConaoUdated morning report . 



2,000 
1.680 
3,170 
2.471 
2.118 
1,914 
2,763 
808 



8,000 
8,000 
2,0M 
2,156 
1,956 
1,556 
2,066 



1,506 
965 

750 
1,251 
1,250 
1,800 
1,249 

500 



6,506 
5,515 
4,976 
5.878 
5,324 
4.770 
6,068 



Bespeotfally submitted to the Qnartermaster-Gtoiieral. 

ALEX. J. PERRY, 
Colonel, Quartermaster's Department, 

QUABTEBMASTSB-GSNSKAL'S OFFICE, SECOND DIVISION, 

October tl, 1866, 

No. 14. 

Statement showing the highest and lowest prices paid by the department for 
articles of clothing and equipage during the past four years of war. 



Articles. 



Uniform hat 

Uniform hat feather 

oord and tassel.. 

eagle 

oastle 

shell and flame. . 
Grossed sabers . . 
crossed cannon . 

bngle 

leUers 

nnmbers 

Foragecaps 

Forace-cap coTors 

Uniform coats 

Jackets 

Chevrons : 

N.C.S pair. 

First sergeant's . . . . do . . . 

Sergeant^ do... 

Corporal's do... 

Cadocens 

Shoolderscalss: 

H.C.S pair.. 

8ergeant*s do... 

Private's do... 

Trousers: 

Footmen's 

Horsemen's .............. 

Sash 

Flannel sack cost: 

Lined 

Unlined 



Lowest 


Highest 
price. 


price. 


$L62 
.084 


♦^lU 


.10{ 


.16 


oo| 


.02 


.08 


.19 


.04 


.04 


.011 
.01} 


.03 


.02* 


.OOJUL 


.02 


.ooJC 


:!!1| 


.OOofi 


.85 


1.04 


.07* 


.12* 


4.06 


14.67 


4.25 


9.94 


.30 


.45 


.18 


.85 


:1?J 


.27 
.18 


.35 


.80 


.35 


.80 


.33 


.80 


.25 


.60 


2.05 


5.40 


8.31| 


5.89 


1.98 


2.50 


2.10 


5.09 


1.87* 


4.37* 



Articles. 



Shirts: 

Flannel , 

Knit 

Drawers: 

Flannel 

Knit 

Stockings 

Bootees: 

Sewed 

Pegged , 

Boots: 

Sewed 

Pegged 

Greatcoats: 

Footmen's 

Horsemen's 

Blanketa: 

Woolen 

Rnbber 

Painted 

Ponchos: 

Robber 

Painted 

Leather stocks 

leggings 

Cotton leggmgn 

Overalls 

Stable fVocks 

Hospital tento and flies 
Wall-tonta and flies . . . . 

Common tento 

Shelter tento 



Lowest 
price. 



90.45 



.87 
.72 
.22* 

1.71 
1.33 

3.00 
1.45 

6.50 
7.74 

2.181 
2.00 
1.90 

1.87 
1.83 

.08 
1.12* 

.74 
1.81 

.62 

56.40 

23.50 

9.87 

1.93 



price. 



$3.01 
2.84 

1.90 
1.78 
.52* 

8.24 
145 

4.83 
4.08* 

13.17 
16.11 

7.75 
5.00 
2.35 

5.60 
2.35 
.13 
2.00 
1.25 
2.06 
2.23 
227.61 
55.00 
25.00 
10.74 



Respectfully submitted to the Qnartermaster-General: 

ALEX. J. PERRY, 
Colonel, Quartermaster' » Department, 

Quartbruaster-Genebal's Office, Second Division, 

Octxiiber SI, isoS, 



UNION AUTHORITIES. 



287 



No. 15. 

Statement'Of etaims received in the Second Vivision of the Quartermagter-OenercU^s 
Office during the fiscal year ending June SO^ 1866, 



Number. Amount. 



Beoeived 

Reported to Third Auditor and referred to ofBcere for settlement. 

DieaUowed (in tbeir preeeat condition) 

Hot ' ' 



198,274.66 
M,«ea.2S 
8,682.65 
22,928.78 



Respectfully submitted. 

A. G. ROBINSON, 
Capt. and A. Q. M,^for CoL Alexander J. Perry ^ in Charge Second Division, 

QnABTERMASTER-GBNBRAl.'B OFFICE, 

Washington, D. C, November 4, 1866, 

Statement of claims received in the Second Division of the Quartermaster-Oeneral's 
Office from July 1, 1866, to present date. 



RseeiTvd 

Reported to TbiM Auditor and referred to offloert for eettlement . 

Diullowed (In their preeent condition) 

Not acted on 



Xumber. Amount. 



$4,516.00 

10.25 

2. 484. 40 

2.021.25 



Respectfully submitted. 

ALEXANDER J. PERRY, 
Colonel, Quartermaster's Department, in Charge Second Division, 

QUARTERlfASTER-QEKERAL'S OFFICE, 

Washington, D, C, November 6, 1866, 

No. 16. 

Quartermaster-General's Office, 

Washington, D, C, August 31, 1865, 
B\i.. Maj. Gen. M. C. Meigs, 

Quartermaster- General U, S, Anny, Washington, D, C: 

General: I have the honor to report for the fiscal year ending 
June 30, 18G5, relative to the operations of the Third Division, in 
charge of the ocean and lake transportation of the War Department, 
as follows: 

Daring the first month of the year the office work of the division 
was nearly suspended by most of the employes being called into act- 
ive service in the field to assist in repelling the rebel raid on Wash- 
ington; nevertheless, sufficient steamers were promptly on hand at 
City Point for the transportation of the Sixth Army Corps to Wa.sh- 
ington and Baltimore, I'endering efficient service in driving back the 
invading force. 

Also, in this month, the army of General Canby was moved from 
New Orleans to Mobile Bay, co-operating with the navy in the reduc- 
tion of the forts. 

From August to December no large army movements requiring 
water transportation were made, but a great number of steamers were 
used to forward the supplies for the armies before Richmond. 

In December the approach of General Sherman's army to the Atlan- 
tic Coast taxed the resources of the department to the utmost extent. 



288 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. 

The precise point of his advent was not known ; it was a stormy season 
of the year, and only reliable ocean steamers could be used, with a 
proper regard for the lives of the passengers and the property on 
board. 

At this time some 300,000 men, including the armies of Grant and 
Sherman, were dependent entirely for their supplies upon water trans- 
portation. The winter was unusually severe ; storms swept the ocean, 
and ice blocked the bays and rivers. Notwithstanding, the troops 
were kept well supplied, and stores and forage were sent as far south 
as Pensaoola, and a large number of light-draft river steamers and 
tugs were sent to Hilton Head, S. C, to be on hand for the naviga- 
tion of the shoal rivers of the Southern coast, all of which, fortunately, 
arrived in safety and rendered efficient sarvice after the fall of Savan- 
nah and Charleston. 

When General Sherman's army left Savannah, in continuation of 
its victorious march through the Southern States, a part was trans- 
ported bv sea to Beaufort, N. C, while the light fleet of steamers fol- 
lowed along the coast, ready again to meet and co-operate with 
the army at Wilmington and Morehead City. A large number of 
canal barges were sent via the Chesapeake and Albemarle Canal to 
carry supplies up the North Carolina rivers. 

On the 24th of this month (December), an eventful one in our his- 
tory, the first attack on Fort Fisher was made, and ocean transporta- 
tion was provided for the land forces from City Point, Va., and, 
when the expedition proved unsuccessful, brought the troops back to 
Fortress Monroe. In January another and successful expedition was 
sent to the Cape Fear River, resulting in the fall of Fort Fisher and 
the evacuation of Wilmington, N. C, by the rebels. 

The department was much embarrassed at this time by the diffi- 
culty of procuring ocean steamers whose draft of water would allow 
them to enter Cape Fear River, and at Morehead City, which were 
not safe to attempt with a greater draft than twelve feet. Steamers 
had to lie at anchor on an open coast in midwinter and discharge 
their cargoes in small vessels. 

In this connection I would state, as worthy of remark, that during 
the last fiscal year only three vessels in the service of the War Depart- 
ment have been lost at sea. One of them, the North America, was a 
new, first-class steamer; another, the General Lyon, took fire and was 
burned ; and the third one, the Admiral Du Pont, collided with a ship 
at sea and was sunk. These were all chartered steamers, and the loss 
of life and property was not great. 

From January to the surrender of General Lee, in April, the water 
transportation department continued faithfully to supply the two 
great armies of Grant and Sherman, and nearly every ocean steamer 
of any capacity in the country was employed. 

After the surrender of the rebel armies in the Atlantic States, and 
the virtual close of the war, every exertion was made to reduce the 
expenses of the depailment, and vessels belonging to the Government 
were sold and chartered ones discharged as fast as the service would 
allow. 

Of the first class it is not supposed the Government will realize a 
sum from their sale in proportion to their original cost. The require- 
ments of the service were such that they were always under a severe 
strain, and, notwithstanding frequent repairs, the close of the war 
found most of them in bad condition. Many ships were yet required 



UNION AUTHORITIES. 289 

to carry back the retaming veterans, and, in addition, transportation 
had to be furnished for thousands of our own released prisoners, and 
for rebel released prisoners, refugees, and freedmen, to the points 
nearest their homes. 

In May a requisition was made upon the department for ocean 
transportation for the Twenty-fifth Anny Corps from City Point, Va., 
to Texas. This corps numbered about 25,000 men. 

The inclosed tabular list will enable you to form an idea of the 
requirements necessary for a large ocean expedition. 

It comprised fifty-seven ocean steamers (one of which made two 
voyages), making the entire tonnage of the vessels employed amount 
to 56,987 tons. 

They were all provided for a twelve-days' voyage, allowing for the 
consumption of coal, per day, 947 tons, and for water, 50,000 gallons. 

While all the vessels were employed the expense of the expedition 
amounted to $33,300.91 per day. 

Each vessel was fitted up suitably for the cargo to be carried. 
Bunks were constructed for the troops, and stalls for 2,139 animals, 
being part of the expedition. 

The vessels were supplied with an ample quantity of coal and wat^r 
and were thoroughly inspected, so that in case of disaster no blame 
would attach to the department for sending unseaworthy vessels. 
They all arrived safely at their destination, no accident of any kind 
having been reported. 

At the same time the Texas expedition was under way, 7,000 troops 
were sent by sea from Washington to Savannah, and 3,000 released 
rebels from Point Lookout and Fort Delaware to Mobile. 

With this closes the work of the ocean and lake transportation 
division for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1865. 

No mention has been made of transportation on the lakes, as none 
was required except one small steamer used for the convenience of 
the prisoners on Johnson's Island, between that and the main. 

The inclosed tabular list of transportation employed by the divis- 
ion shows the number of vessels in service during the year, from 
which it appears the average daily expense of the division, for the 
fiscal year, amounts to 1(92,414. 

The average number of steamers employed, owned, and chartered, 
351; tugs, 111. 

llie average amount of tonnage of the above, 171,081; tonnage of 
tugs, 13,262. 

The average number of sail vessels employed, 89. 

The average amount of tonnage of the above, 17,738. 

The average number of barges employed, 168. 

The average amount of the tonnage of the above, 22,903. 

The total number of vessels employed, 719. 

The total amount of tonnage employed, 224,984. 

In closing my report, I would respectfully make some remarks rel- 
ative to the duties of my division, and the transportation, by water, 
of the United States. 

At the beginning of the rebellion we were found wanting in nearly 
every material preparation for the war, except an ample supply of 
ships and steamers, the importance of which was very great in a coun- 
try like ours, penetrated in every direction by navigable rivers, and 
indented on the coast by deep and sheltered harbors. 

19 R Br-SBRIBS m, VOL V 



290 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC, 

Nothing contributed more to the success of our cause than this, 
enabling us, with the assistance of the Navy, to concentrate rapidly 
and secretly large bodies of troops ujKjn the weak points of the enemy, 
and in this way New Orleans, Hilton Head, Fort Fisher, City Point, 
Mobile, and the great Mississippi Valley were cleared of the rebels. 
That they fully appreciated this is evident from their desperate and 
frantic efforts to destroy our shipping by the torch of the incendiary, 
torpedoes, or the more open attack by armored vessels. 

In the first rush of troops to the war, by the inexperience of quar- 
termasters, or the unfaithfulness of Government agents, and not over- 
patriotic shipowners, many unsuitable vessels were employed for the 
service and paid at high prices. This was remedied as soon as possi- 
ble by the Quartermaster-General, and a scale of prices fixed per 
ton for the guidance of quartermasters, and stringent orders issued 
that no vessel should be sent with troops to sea unless she had been 
properly constructed for such purpose. 

All charters were made allowing the department to take possession 
of the vessel by paying 33 per cent, profit on the valuation, and the 
running expenses and repairs, and be credited with the amount paid 
for charter. By this means a large number of vessels became the 
property of the Government, and the higher the rate of charter the 
sooner the vessel would pay for herself. The valuation was fixed by 
one or more officers of the Navy duly detailed for that duty. 

It is important that quartermaster should inform themselves of the 
kind of steamers suitable to carry troops by sea. 

If a side-wheel steamer, in order that the paddle wheels may be 
secure from the action of the waves, the projection in the side, called 
the 8i)on8ing, should be carried up so as to make that portion as solid 
as any other part of the ship. This is to be done by carrying timbers, 
curved according to the form necessary for admitting the water to the 
paddles, from the floor of the ship to the very outermost projection as 
well as within the paddles, de\iating very little from what would be 
the regular form of a sailing vessel. 

According to the best author! ties, the following parts of a vessel of 
this kind should be increased in actual strength by one-fourth, viz: 
The keel, stern, apron or inner stern, futtocks, floor timbers, dead- 
wood, stern post, transom, inner post, frame timbers, and filling tim- 
bers abreast of the engine, as should also the wales, the rudder, and 
the rudder fastenings. The steamer should be provided with suffi- 
cient masts and sails, in case of accident to her motive power, which 
should not be less than a fore-and-aft sail to each mast, set upon a 
gaff, these being intended for the usual wants of the vessel; while 
there should also be a trysail to each mast, to be set in storms. 

The weight of machinery should be well below the water-line; and 
quartermasters should not be deceived into employing as ocean 
steamers river or lake vessels boxed up to resemble a sea vessel, but 
having broad guards only a few feet from the water, and which the 
first storm at sea is liable to send to the bottom. 

Steamers for the transportation of troops by sea should be high 
between decks, and well ventilated by hatches, wind-sails, and side- 
lights. Water-closet arrangements and temporary bath fixtures can 
easily be made, which contribute greatly to the health and comfort of 
troops on shipboard. Dampness can be obviated by the use of drying 
stoves. 

I would respectfully recommend that the arms, baggage, and knap- 
sacks of the troops be taken, as they embark, and stowed in a con- 



UNION AUTHORITIES. 291 

venient place, to be returned when about to leave the ship. Soldiers 
from seasickness, want of use to the motion of the ship, are unable 
to take care of their arms, which might be damaged without the 
possibility of their preventing it. 

When a steam vessel comes alongside of a wharf or other vessel 
care should be taken that the gang boards are properly fixed and 
attended by seamen before the troops are allowed to step on them, 
and they ought to be made to march with regularity. 

The senior officer in command of troox)s on board should cause a 
careful inspection to be made twice a day relative to their condition, 
and if any symptoms of a contagious disease should appear among 
the men, they should be immediately separated from their comrades 
until the character of the disease is known. 

While a well-regulated ship is remarkable for health, one where 
proper precautions are not observed soon becomes a floating pest- 
house. A steamer for the transportation of troops should be well 
provided with boats ready to lower away at a moment's notice. She 
should be fitted with sufficient life buoys, ready to be shipped or cast 
away if a i)er8on should fall overboard. 

The troops on board should on no account be allowed to interfere 
with the management of the ship, and arrangements should be made 
in case of accidents to prevent a rush to the boats. 

If a boat is to be lowered, it should be done by the people of the 
ship, and not by soldiers unaccustomed to that kind of service, which 
often causes loss of life. 

The commanding officer on board should only under extraordinary 
circumstances oblige the captain to put to sea, or cross a dangerous 
bar, to go into port, if the captain should protest against it as incur- 
ring risk of life and property. For the more particular guidance of 
quartermasters in charge of transix)rtation I would refer to the excel- 
lent instructions embodied in the Revised Army Regulations of the 
War Department, page 20, article 37. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

GEO. D. WISE, 
Colonel, in Charge Ocean and Lake Transportation, 

No. 17. 

Statement of vessels chartered or employed in the Quartermaster's Department 
{on ocean and lake service) during the fiscal year ended June SO, 186S,* 

KECAPITULATION. 

8lde>w]iMl staanieTS 97 

Screw steunera 80 

Screw tags 88 

Bwk»..-. 4 

Brig» 6 

Scboonen 76 

Pilet-bonte 8 

Cuud-lMrgM 95 

Totol "iu 

GEO. D. WISE, 
Colonel, in Charge of Ocean and Lake TransporUUion, 

* Omitted, except the " Recapittilation." 



292 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. 

No. 18. 

lAat of vuads owned hu the United States and emplcyed on ooeon and lake 
service for the fleoal year ending June SOy 1866.* 

RBCAPITULATIOK. 

Side-wlieel ttMDMn 71 

Propanen 40 

Tug* 28 

Seboonera 12 

Guial-bttESM ; 22 

Gnuidtotel 177 

QEO. D. WISE, 
CoUmelt in Charge T?Urd Division, Ocean and Lake Transportation, 

No. 19. 

Vessds owned and chartered January i, 186S, 

(OoeaD and Lake Dlriaioii, Colonel Wise.) 





Owned. 


Chartered. 


Claaa. 


b^' 


Tona. 


Sxpenae per 

month, 

TtotoaUDS 

and mannlog. 


yum. 
ber. 


Tona. 


Brpeiiaeper 
month. 


Ton --. 


106 
20 


41.822 
S.498 
l,5fi0 
2,481 


8151.006.75 

23,475.60 

4,589.00 

2,530.00 


276 
91 
76 

171 


140,822 
11,428 
15,288 
23.685 


81,930.840.02 
182,073.70 


SUiVlniV TTMTla 


87.505l21 


Baripn...... 


80.834.18 






Total 


171 


40,858 


181,71L26 


812 


191,149 


2.2S0.802.11 







RBCAPITULATIOK. 

Total nnmber of Toeaela oharterad and owned 783 

Total amount of tonnage of Teeaela ohartored and owned 210,807 

Total ooet per month. Tiotnaling and manning owned ▼eaaeis 0181,711.25 

Total coat per month, reaaela chartered 2,250.882.11 

Xatimated coat per month, coaling owned and chartered Teaaela— aay 50,000 tona of ooa], 

at 08 per ton 400.000.00 

Estimated repaira, Ao 0Q,O0a00 

Total monthly expenaea 2,022,578.30 

Daily ezpenaea 87.419. U 

Vessels owned and chartered July i, 1866. 





Owned 


Chartered. 


Claaa. 


Nam- 
ber. 


Tona. 


Ezpenaeper 

month, 

Tictnaling 

and manning. 


Nnm. 
ber. 


Tons. 


Expense per 
month. 


fltAamera 


116 
23 
12 
20 


48,175 
2,978 
1,938 
2,405 


8192,244.00 
21,181.00 
7.570.00 
2. 480. 00 


177 
89 
74 

100 


90,780 
6.084 
17,686 
14,010 


81.403.850.00 
188.960.00 


'SS^:::::::::'::""""''*^'*'"*^"***** 


Sailing Tfaactia 


88,851 00 


Bwrma 


42,040.00 


^'^^W^'-'-*^'' '•'»•••■ 




TMal 


170 


66,496 


223,475.00 


420 


188*440 


1,728»700.00 





* Omitted, except the " Recapitulation." 



UNION AUTHOBITIE8. 293 

RBCAPnULATIOV. 

Tito! anmbT of ▼eoeeto chiigred and ownad 5M 

Totel am<mBt of toBiia|C« of tosmU olmrtered and owned 198,886 

Total ooot per BKHitli, TtotooUaic and Buuinlsg ownod TflSMli 8223,47^.00 

Total eoot per month, Toaaels coartered 1,728,700.00 

Eatimated ooet per month, coaling owned and ohartered veaoela— aay 40,000 tone of ooal, 

88 per ton 820,000.00 

Eathnated lepatra, &o 200,000.00 

Total monthlj expenaee 2,472,17&.00 

Daily expenaee 82,405.00 

£atimated aTorage ezpenaee for the year, 102,414 per day. 

Avemge number of vesadSj tpith the tonnapet empioved by the Third Diviewn^ 
Quartermaater-OeneraTs Department, during the jUcal year ending June SO, 
1865. 





Knaher. 


Tonnage. 


8tifainffli ... 


851 
Ul 
88 
168 


171,061 


Toga 


13,282 


Saflinff rneaob 


17,788 


SSJS.!?!??!.:::::::;:::::::;:::::::::;:;::::::::::::::::::::;::^ 


23,803 






Total 


719 


224,984 







No. 20. 

Lixt of vesaeU in eervice of Quartermaster's Dgaartment supplying General Sher- 
man's army.* 

SUHMABT. 

Steamera 73 

Tuga 8 

Sfaipe 8 

Briga 1 

Schoonera 12 

Pilo^hoata 2 

Tolal li 

OEOBGE D. WISE, 
CoUmel^ in Charge Third Division, 

No. 21. 

Quartbrmastbr-General's Office, 

Washington^ D, C, Novernber 8, 1865. 
Maj. Gen. M. C. Meios, 

Quartermaster- General : 
General : From the best information that we have in my ofl&ce, we 
had in service, supplying the armies of Greneral Grant before Rich- 
mond in the spring of 1865, 190 steamers chartered and owned; 60 
tngs chartered and owned; 40 sailing vessels chartered and owned; 
100 barges chartered and owned; in all, 390 vessels, 120,000 tons, at a 
daily expense of $48,000. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

GEO. D. WISE, 
CdUmelj in Charge of Ocean and Lake Service. 

No. 22. 

Washington, D. C, August, 1866. 
Bvt. Maj. Gen. M. C. Meigs, 

Quarierrruister' Oeneral : 
GeneraIj: In accordance with your orders I came, to this city in 
November last to undertake the organization of the Fourth Division of 

♦Omitted, except the " Summary." 



294 GOBBESPONDENCE, ETC. 

your office, charged with the general management of rail and river 
transportation under the recent law of Congress. 

Finding in addition to present current duties that there was thrown 
ux)on the division millions of dollars of complex, unadjusted accounts 
for services rendered in the early years of the war, and discovering 
that not only were Government creditors justly complaining of delay 
in the settlement of their claims, but that these arrears were greatly 
interfering with the regular business of the office, I gave the subject 
prompt attention, and I am glad to report that by the vigilant efforts 
of the division not only have these arrears of business been brought 
up, but by my request all transi>ortation accounts have been trans- 
ferred from the general accounting office and are now being regularly 
audited in the Fourth Division. This change will, I think, in secur- 
ing a more prompt and efficient investigation by experts, result in a 
decided improvement. 

To i)erform this service properly, howevet, the clerical force should 
be so increased that an examination of all the accounts may be had 
within a month after their return, and thus errcJrs be promptly detected, 
instead of continuing for months or years without a remedy. 

Until recently, as you are aware, there has been no uniform system 
in the mode of procuring transportation, in the forms used, or in settling 
for the same, each quartermaster acting independently, adopting such 
as best suited his views or convenience, some being good and others 
materially defective, in furnishing no proper checks, and resulting in 
irregularity, confusion, and much loss to the Government. 

Perceiving this, and convinced that a uniform system in a business 
BO complex and important, even if not perfect, was better t^n none, 
or than many various and conflicting ones, and seeing no reason why 
such uniformity was not attainable and applicable to every section of 
the country, also satisfied that in no other way could the Government 
be protected from loss or its officers made familiar with their duties, 
it became a primary object with me to secure^such system as, while it 
should remedy patent defects, would.at the same time be satisfactory 
to the transportation interests of the country. 

This end has been, I think, to a great extent attained by General 
Orders, No. 17, March 16, 1865, in reference to passenger transporta- 
tion; by General Orders, No. 29, May 9, 1865, as to freight transpor- 
tation, and by General Orders, No. 18, March 16, 1865, in reference to 
the settlement of accounts, copies of which are herewith transmitted, 
together vrith the forms and blanks adopted and used under such 
oiders. The system is now in general operation with most satisfac- 
tory results, and I believe meets not only with the general approba- 
tion of Government officers, but also of railroad companies and others 
furnishing Government transportation. 

There are still some defects which can only be corrected by a change 
in the Regulations, which will probably be made whenever a revision 
occurs. Experience will also doubtless suggest further improvements 
which should be adopted as their importance becomes obvious. 

A table of distances between all important points in the country has 
been prepared and other improvements made, which will result in a 
large saving of labor and expense. 

For such particular tabular statements as you may desire I beg 
leave to refer to my successor in charge of the division, as at the pres- 
ent time the required reports of various officers of the department 
have not been returned to enable me to collect and furnish the same. 



UNION AUTHORITIES. 295 

In conclusion, I believe the duties of the division are being satis- 
factorily perfonned, and am pleased to report that the oflficers and 
clerks have labored not only harmoniously, but with the most com- 
mendable zeal and fidelity for the public interest. Some of them, I 
think, are fully entitled to advancement, which I trust may be given 
them. To Mr. Wallace, chief clerk of the railroad division, I am 
indebted for many suggestions and valuable improvements. His 
observation and experience in railroad business, combined with his 
energy and devotion to his duty, render him a valuable assistant. 

Very respectfully, 

LEWIS B. PARSONS, 

Brig. Oen, and Chief of Fourth Div., Q, M, GeneroTs Office, 

No. 23. 

RAIL AND RIVER TRANSPORTATION, FOURTH DIVISION. 

List of steamers and other vessels at Mobile and on the Mississippi River and trib' 
utaries belonging to the United States June SO, ISCS.* 

RBCAPITULATIOX. 

Slde-wbeel st«ameni 84 

Steni-wbe«] steunera 37 

Oenter-whAel Bteiimen S 

Screw tags 18 

Ferry-boato 1 

Total steamen 91 

Steam boat hulls 8 

Model bams 74 

OtiDwale barges 228 

SmsII wood barges 96 

Kox barges 8 

Barges Dot classified 23 

Total barges 852 

Wharf boats 18 

Csnal-boata 3 

Coalboats 80 

Yawl-boaU 58 

Sailboats 1 

Metallic boats 1 

Totftlboato 139 

Skiffs 9 

Floating docks 1 

Small flats 2 

Sectknal docks 8 

Total 699 

ALEXANDER BLISS, 
Bvt, Col, and A. Q, Jfcf.. in Cliarge Fourth JXv,, Q. M. Oeneral^s Office. 

No. 24. 

Office Director and General Manager 

Military Railroads of United States, 

Washington, D, C, October 31, 1866. 
Bvt. Maj. Gen. M. C. Meigs, 

Quartermaster' Oeneral U. S. Army, Washirigton, D. C: 
General: I have the honor to submit the following brief statement 
of operations of U. S. Military Railroads for the year ending June 
30,1865: 

A more full and comprehensive report will be made as soon as the 
necessary statistics can be compiled. 
These operations were conducted in six different iields, as follows: 
I. Virginia. 

♦Omitted, except the " Recapitulation." 



296 



CORRESPONDENCE, ETC 



II. Military Division of the Mississippi, 
ni. Georgia. 

IV. North Carolina. 

V. Missouri. 

VI. Arkansas. 

I. — vntamiA. 

The following lines were in operation July 1, 1864: 



Name of line. 




1 


Piwn- 


To- 


Alflxandrift ftii4 Wntbiiiaton 


Alffrandria 


D^nchlnfftffn . , , T . . . 


JIUm. 

7 


A iMTStMlpiA. T,.Anflninn an? ^****IMlhiPfl ...• 


.... do 


VifnnaT 


10 


Qmtn ft"^ AlexandriA 


do 


Sprincfleld 


8 


KorfSik and Petorsbnrg 


Korfolk 


sSffoff..:..: 

do 


n 


BiMiboard and RoanAke .......TTTr--^...-T---r.r 


Portamonth 


18 


City Point and Petarabnri^. 


City Point 


NearPetarabnrg 

Halltown .7 


8 


Winohimtflr and PoUnnao T 


Harper'a Farry 


8 


Total 




80 











During the year the railroads from Alexandria and Norfolk have 
not borne a prominent part in extended military operations, but were 
used almost entirely for local purposes. 

In the vicinity of Petersburg thirteen miles of new railroad were 
built to supply the army of General Grant during his siege of that 
place. 

Upon the surrender of Petersbuig, Richmond, and the army of 
General Lee, the Richmond and Petersburg Railroad, twenty-one miles 
long, was immediately opened ; also the line from Petersburg to Burke- 
ville, fifty-two miles. 

Statement of total number of miles operated during year ending June SO, 1866. 



Name of line. 



Terminal station. 



From— 



To- 



Alezandria and Waahinaton 

Alexandria, Londoun ana Hampshire.. 

Orange and Alexandria 

HanassasGap 

Korfolk and Petersburg 

Seaboard and Koanoke 

City Point and Army 

SoathSide 

Richmond and Banrille 

Winchester and Potomac 

Richmond and Petersburg 

CloTor Hill Bnnoh 



Alexandria 

.....do 

do 

Hanasaaa 

Norfolk 

Portamonth 

Pitkin Stotion 

City Point 

Manchester 

Harper's Feny 

Petembarg 

doTorHiU Station .. 



Waahington.... 

Vienna 

Rappahannock . 

Piedmont 

SnlTolk 

do 

Humphreys .... 

Bnrkeyille 

DanTllle 

Stephenaon'a... 

Manchester 

Coair 



7 
15 
51 
84 
23 
18 
13 

a 

140 
28 
21 
18 



Total. 



Excepting the Winchester and Potomac Railroad, which is still 
operated by this department, all these roads were turned over to the 
original owners or to the Board of Public Works during or previous to 
the month of August last. 



UNION AUTHOBITIBS. 



297 



The largest number of persons employed in any month daring the 
year was 4,489, in April, 1865; and the least number per month was 
3,268. 

The exi>en8es during the year amounted to $4,900,000. 

n.—iOLrrART division of the Mississippi. 

At the commencement of the year the lines in operation were as 
follows: 



HaneofUa*. 




\ 


Fram^ 


To— 




KaahTlile 


diattannnn 


MUes. 

151 


KMhTlii«. Dfffimtnr anil Ff{ft7m«oii r 


.....do 


Storeoaon* 


soo 


KaahTille and North wMtem 


do 


ToDiiaaaae BItot 

KnozTilla 


78 




Chattaaooga 


lis 




do ...r. 


JUr Hhantv 


107 


ClttTttlaiid mmI Paltm 


CloTolasd 


Saton?;^.:::::::::.. 


» 




Klnnton 


Rome 


17 


Vfi»p*it find Charimton 


Hamphia 


GxaBdJnnotlon 


n 


Total 




744 











In August and September, 1864, the Nashville and Clarksville 
Railroad, sixty-two miles long, was oi>ened, by order of Major- 
Greneral Sherman, to reach another line of water supply for the dexx>t 
of Nashville. 

By the capture of Atlanta, in August, the entire Chattanooga and 
Atlanta line, 136 miles long, was opened, and for a short time trains 
were run a few miles south of Atlanta on the road toward Macon, Ga. 

Upon the advance of General Sherman toward Savannah, in Novem- 
ber, the Chattanooga and Atlanta line was abandoned south of Dalton, 
Ga., until after the surrender of Greneral J. £. Johnston's army, when 
it was reopened by order of Major-General Thomas. 

Some forty miles of this road were destroyed by General Hood in 
his great raid of October, 1864, and about the same distance by order 
of General Sherman, ux)on his leaving Atlanta. All this damage was 
repaired by the Construction Corps, as well as that caused during the 
December campaign to the railroad near Nashville, amounting in the 
aggregate to about 130 miles of new track. 

The Knoxville and Bristol line was opened in the spring of 1865 to 
Carter's Station, 110 miles from Knoxville and to within twenty miles 
of the Virginia line. 

In West Tennessee the railroad was extended from Grand Junction 
to Tallahatchie River, 100 miles southeast from Memphis, in August, 
1864. 

This line was abandoned, partially reopened, again abandoned, and 
again reopened, and still once more abandoned and reopened, until, 
on the 20th day of May, 1865, it was finally reopened to Grand Junc- 
tion, and June 30 to Pocahontas, seventy-five miles east of Memphis. 

The Mobile and Ohio road was opened in May, 1865, from Colum- 
bus, Ky., to Union City, Tenn., twenty-six miles. 



298 



CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. 



The following table shows the lines and distances upon each 
operated during the year: 



Kame of line. 



TermlDal station. 



From— 



Naahyille and Chattanooga 

Naahville, Decatur and Ktevennon . 

KiiBhTiUe and NortbweHteru 

Nashville and Clarkaville 

JShelbyville Branch 

Chattanr)oj;a and Knozville 

Enoxvillt) and RrlHtol 

Cleveland and Dalton 

Chattanooga and Atlanta 

Konie Hrannh 

Atlanta and Macon 

Meinpbie and Charleston 

HiMissippi Central 

Mobile and Ohio 



Naihrille 

do 

do 

do 

Wartraoe 

Chattanoofca 

Knozville 

Cleveland 

Chattanooga 

Kingston 

Atlanta 

Memphis 

Grand Junction . 
Columbua, Ky ... 



Chattanooga 

Stevenson 

Johnsonville 

CTarkeviUe 

ShelbyTiUe 

KuoxvlUe 

Garter's station .... 

Dalton 

AUanU 

Bome 

Rough and Ready . . 

Pocahontas 

Tallahatchie River . 
Union City, Tenn . . . 



Mii0S. 

151 

100 

78 

83 

9 

112 

110 

37 

138 

17 

11 

75 

48 

2o 



Total. 



The expenditures during the year for these roads, including labor, 
matierials, and supplies, in round numbers, were 117,000,000. 

All the lines embraced in this military division, since merged in 
the Military Division of the Tennessee, were turned over in Septem- 
ber, 1865, to the companies owning them before the war, in obedience 
to the Executive order of August 8, 1865. 

III.— GEORGIA. 

In December a force of the Construction Corps with some transpor- 
tation men were ordered from Tennessee to Savannah, Ga. , to operate 
such roads as General Sherman should require. 

Before this force reached Savannah, General Sherman had left on 
his march to North Carolina, and it was turned back from Hilton 
Head about the 1st of February and sent to New Berne, N. C. 

A few miles of railroad at Savannah were operated until July for 
local military purjKJses, when tliey were surrendered to the companies 
by order of the department commander. 

IV.— NORTH CAROLINA. 

The first installment of railix)»ul operatives arrived at Morehead 
City on the 6th of February, 1805. At that date the railroad toward 
Goldsborough was in running order forty-four miles. At various 
times, as the country was occupied by the Union armies, the roads 
were opened, and on the IDtli of April trains entered Raleigh. At 
that date there were in operation as military railroad lines the 
following: 

Milea. 

Morehead City to Goldsborough 85 

Wilmington to Goldsborough 95 

Goldsborough to Raleigh 48 

Total 228 

In rebuilding these lines 2,991 linear feet of bridging was con- 
structed, consuming 779,510 feet, 1>. M., of timber. 

A wharf was built at Morehead City at a cost of $32,086, with an 
area of 53,682 square feet, and employing 700,000 feet, B. M., of 
timber. 



XnnON AUTH0B1TIB6. 299 

All the railroads in this State have been returned to the original 
owners. 

The expenditures in North Carolina from February 6 to June 30, 
1865, amounted to $967,847.53. 

v.— MISSOURI. 

In October, 1864, orders were received to have the bridges rebuilt 
which had been destroyed by the rebels on the main line of the Pacific 
Railroad of Missouri and its southwestern branch. This work was 
completed April 1, 1865, at a cost of $170,564.65. 

VI. — ARKANSAS. 

The only line used in this State for military purposes is a x>ortion 
of the Memphis and Little Rock Railroad, between Devall's Bluff, on 
White River, and Little Rock, forty-nine miles long. 

This did not come under control of this office until May 1, 1865. At 
that time it was in exceedingly bad order, and required large expend- 
itures to make it capable of doing the work required of it. At this 
date it is still operated as a milita^ railroad line. 

In the foregoing statements it is shown there was in operation 
within the last fis<^l year the following aggregate number of miles of 
military railroad lines: 



InViriciBia 430 

In MiUtary Division of the Mioslssippi..... 1,062 

In North Carolina 228 

InArkanaas 48 

Total 1,769 

On these lines was the following quantity of rolling-stock, includ- 
ing that captured from the enemy: 



Divtrion or hUtlbb, 


LooomotlvM. 


Cm. 


Ttniniik 


U 

216 
21 
2 

239 

29 
10 

330 


081 


Military Division of the MiMlssippi : 


"•SJ 


Memphia 


Colambiu 


IT 


^«rtJi Cftn>liii» 


^a 


ArkMioM 


96 


Total 


8.052 





The above does not include the locomotives and cars built in the 
fall and winter of 1864, which, owing to the close of the war, were 
never sent to the roads, but sold at the manufacturers' or at points 
where stored. 

Of these, there were 35 locomotives and 492 cars of five-feet gauge, 
designed for the Military Division of the Mississippi and North Caro- 
lina; 50 cars of four feet eight and a half inch gauge, for Virginia, 
and North Carolina; and 9 cars of same gauge used on the Western 
railroads to transport five-foot cars from the makers to the Ohio 
River, making in all 551 cars. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

D. C. McCALLUM, 
BvL Brig. Oen.y Director and Oen. Man, Mil. KailroadSy U. S. 

Per H. K. COOPER, in Charge. 



300 



COBRESPONDENCE, ETC. 
No. 25. 



Statement sJiawing the number of employ^ in U. 8. MUUary BaQroad Depart- 
ment from December y 1864, to April, 1866, taken from the officers* reports of 
persona hired for the months given^ which are on file in this office. 



Btetion. 



OiBoert. 



i 



9 



s 



I 



f 



CbatUnooga, Teon. 

Do 

NewlleniiB,K.G... 
NuhyiUe, Tttm 

Do 

Do 

HemphU, Teon 

LiUle Rock, Ark... 
YirginU 



C*pt. W.B.Hopki]is 

\Cvs^ F. T. StarkwMther . 

W.J.SteT«iM 

CaptF.J.CrlUy 

L.H. BicbolU 

Capt. John Parks 

Capt. J. H.Pratt 

J.J.Moore 



Total. 



4,850 
l.OM 



4.8ia 
1,839 



878 



2,1160 



8,801 



4,e22 

2.137 

9,170 
3.380 
1.190 
203 
479 
3,458 



5,198 

2,843 

7,744 
1,283 
1,008 
302 
1.086 
4,082 



8,744 



9,901 



23.477 



5,081 

8,818 

8,831 
78 



391 

774 



4,4 



:»,538 



ALEXANDER BLISS, 
Bvt. Col, and A. Q. If., in Charge Fourth Div., Q, M, OeneraTs Office. 

No. 26. 

Statement of daims received and disposed of in the Fourth Division, Quarter- 
master-Oeneral^s Office, from November 1, 1864, to June 30, 1865, 



Natore of aenrioe. 



I 



fO^ ^^ El 



*7^ £ 
- t '^ Id 

■ - ='^ 



? 



8 
I 



I 



i 
i 

I 



Bmployte on the U. S. HOi- 

tarv Railroade. 
£mploj68 on U. 8. ateamere, 

gnnboftta, fto. 
Uaeof Teaaola, bargee, &o — 
Materials tnmlahed for use of 

U. 8. Military Railroads. 
Tranaporting troops and Got- 

emmentsnpplies by rail and 

suge. 
Litbographlsgtransportation 

Ofders. 
Advertising army transporta- 
tion and proposals. 
Employes In Qoartennaater'a 

Department. 
Snppiiea furnished Quarter- 

mast«r'ii Department. 

Telegraphing 

SmpToyes on U. 8. military 

ielegrapb lin<«. 
Kat«nals ftimished for use of 

military telegraph. 
Serrioea in the Army 



87 



101 
7 



$17, 105. 58 

85,442.62 

02,068.09 
9.721.81 

4.676,479.08 

3,409.00 

442.18 

334.01 

08.00 

104.54 
874.80 



$1,391.39 

28,716.79 

20,138.00 
2,275.00 



Total 

Total number of claims . 



4,003.564.82 



1.464 



$25,078.84 

61,063.38 

127,239.88 
11,990.31 

1,113.936.50 $5,341.00 5.084,045.48 



$7,170.27 

494.92 

39,038.19 



028.36 



70.08 



106.68 



100.00 



1,169,820.03 



889 



2.469.00 

442.13 

1.029.04 

68.00 

270.12 
274.36 



6.34LU0 5.918,860.79 



ALEXANDER BLISS, 
Brevet Colonel and Assistant Quartermaster, in Charge of Fourth Division. 



UNION AUTHORITIES. 301 

No. 27.* 
No. 28.t 
No. 29.t 
No. 30.§ 
No. 31. 1 
No. 32. 
Aceounts divUion, Section C. 

Quartbrmaster-Gbneral's Office, 
Washingian, D. C, October SI, 1865. 
The following is a statement of the amounts paid Epifanio Agnirre 
during the months from July 1, 1864, to June 30, 1865, as taken from 
the money accounts of Maj. H. M. Enos for that period, yiz:^ 

BENJAMIN C. CARD, 
Coiondy Qtuirtermaster^s Dept, in Charge of Ninth Dimsion, 

No. 33. 

Quartermaster-General's Office, 

Washington, D. C, May 10, 1866. 
Bvt. Brig. Gen. D. C. McCallum, 

Director and Oeneral Manager Military Railroads, United States : 

(Through Colonel Parsons, Division of Rail and River Transpor- 
tation.) 

General: A very large number of troops will be sent within the 
next twenty days from this vicinity to their respective States to be 
there mustered out of service. The several railway companies should 
be advised to prepare for the movement. 

Troops for the West and Southwest will probably move by the Bal- 
timore and Ohio Railroad to the Ohio River, which will be used as far 
as possible for transportation by steam-boat of troops destined for the 
country bordering on the Ohio and for points south of the Ohio. 

T^ops for Saint Louis, Mo., and Kansas will probably go down the 
Ohio to Lawrenceburg, and then take the Ohio and Mississippi Rail- 
road west. 

Troops for Central Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois will go by Bellaire, 
Columbus, Indianax)oli8, and so on west. 

Troops for the Northwest, by Harrisburg, Pittsburg, Chicago, or 
Clevelfiuid, Lake Erie, and Detroit. 

Troops for Central Pennsylvania and New York, by the Northern 
Central Railway to Harrisburg and Elmira. 

Troops for Eastern New York, New Jersey, and New England, by 

*For special report of Col. L. B. Parsons of the transportation of the Twenty- 
third Army Corps from the Tennessee to the Potomac (oere omitted), see Series 
T. Vol. XLVn, ^art II, p. 214. 

I For report of Col. L. B. Parsons of movements on the Western rivers and 
railroads darinflr the war (here omitted) , see Series I, Vol. LII, Part I, p. 704. 

X For General Orders, !no. 17, Qnartennaster-Qeneral's Office, March 16, 1865 
(here omitted), see Vol. IV, this series, p. 1299. 

gFor Genenal Orders, No. 18, Quartermaster-(}eneral*s Office, March 16, 1866 
(here omitted), see Vol. IV, this series, p. 1241. 

I For General Orders, No. 29, Qnartermaster-Oeneral's OfOce, May 9, 1865 (here 
omitted), see p. 16, ante. 

1 Details omitted. The total amount was $188,177.89. 



302 GOBBBSPONDENCB, ETC. 

Baltimore, Philadelphia, New York, Albany, or New Haven, Hart- 
ford, and Springfield. 

The sonnd and river boats should be used wherever x)ossible, as 
affording a relaxation and rest to the troops crowded in cars, and as 
being cheaper generally than railroad transportation. 

Troops for the Northeast will go by way of New York, and the most 
direct routes thence to their resi)ective destinations. 

It is important that in this movement, which Mill be large and con- 
tinue for some time, every x)ossible precaution to insure the safety 
and comfort of the men should be observed. 

For this purpose you will put yourself in communication with the 
several rai&oad lines. You will insist upon the orders of this depart- 
ment, requiring cars used for transportation of troops to be carefully 
fitted up and provided with water and other necessary conveniences, 
being fully observed and enforced. 

Halts of the trains at proper points, to ^nable the soldiers to attend 
to the calls of nature, should be arranged. 

Proper stoppages for meals; in short, everything should be done to 
enable those soldiers who have survived the dangers of four years of 
warfare to reach their homes with the least inconvenience, fatigue, 
suffering, and danger. 

A copy of memorandum of routes is with tliis.* Orders for the 
movement will be given by the military commanders. It is desired 
that it be as rapid as is consistent with safety. 

I have recommended that troops going north and northeast be 
marched to Baltimore, believing that tlie single railroad from this 
point to Baltimore will be fully occupied with the movement of troops 
going west from the Relay House, and that for any large body of 
troops the quickest movement for forty miles will be made on foot. 
I am, very respectfully, your obedient serv^ant, 

M. C. MEIGS, 
Quartermaster- General, Brevet Major- General, 

Quaktermaster-General's Office, 

Washington, 7). C, May ^7, 286S. 
Brig. Gen. E. D. Towksend, 

Assistant Adjutant- General, Washington, D. C: 
General: The necessary genr^ral arrangements for the transporta- 
tion of the troops of the armies of the Potomac and General Sherman 
to the points indicated by Circular 19, Adjutant-General's Office, 1865, 
have l^en made. 

In order, however, to avoid delay and confusion in this city, and 
insure prompt forwarding to destination, I request that the command- 
ers of regiments, and larger commands, upon receiving orders to move, 
shall make their requisition at once upon Brigadier-General Rucker, 
leaving their commands in camp until such time as, upon conference 
with General Rucker, shall be fixed for departure. 

Five thousand men for any one section of the country are as many 
as should go together; 10,000 can go from here to Relay House per 
day, if necessary. 

It is requested that a list of the commands ordered to move may be 
each day, and as early as possible, furnished this office. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

M. C. MEIGS, 
Quartermaster- Ge n eral, Bre vet Major- General, 

♦ See p. 308, post. 



UNION AUTHORITIES. 303 

Quartermaster-General's Office, 

Washington, D, C, May 27, 1866. 
Brig. Gten. D. H. Rucker, 

Depot Quartermaster, Washington, D, C: 

General: Inclosed are copies of General Orders, No. 94, and Circu- 
lar No. 19, Adjutant-GeneraFs Office, an estimate of troops to be mus- 
tered out of the armies of the Potomac and of General Sherman ;♦ also 
memoranda giving the routes to be taken by the troops of the several 
States to their points of destination, respectively. 

The troops will begin to move at once. Colonel Moulton, at Cin- 
cinnati, is prepared to provide river transportation from Parkersburg 
for those indicated to go by that route. 

Please give him timely notice of movements thither as they occur, 
that be may have boats ready. 

General Van Vliet, at New York, has been instructed to provide 
water transportation where practicable for forwarding from New York 
New England troops. 

The troops of Michigan and Wisconsin will take boats at Cleveland 
for Detroit, and those for Wisconsin again at Grand Haven for 
Milwaukee. 

The quartermaster at these points especially should receive timely 
notice of departure of troops to go by those routes, and at all points 
on the lines of railroads where change of cars must be made ample 
notice should be given to the quartermasters and railroad companies 
concerned, that they may be prepared to receive and forward the troops 
at once. 

Very respectfully, M. C. MEIGS, 

Qtiartermaster-Oeneral, Brevet Major- Qeneral. 

[Inclosore.] 

Routes of troops returning home, 

Trocps of Missouri and Kansas: Baltimore and Ohio Railroad to 
Bellaire or Parkersburg, Ohio River to Lawrenceburg, Ohio and Mis- 
sissippi Railroad to Saint Louis, thence rail to points of destination. 

Trooi)6 of Kentucky, Tennessee, and Northern Alabama : Baltimore 
and Ohio Railroad to Bellaire or Parkersburg, Ohio River to Covington 
and Louisville, and thence rail to destination. 

Troops for Arkansas : Baltimore and Ohio Railroad to Bellaire or 
Parkersburg, Ohio River, Memphis, Devall's Bluff, Little Rock. 

Troops for Middle and Southern Illinois: Baltimore and Ohio Rail- 
road to Wheeling, Ohio River to Lawrenceburg, Ohio and Mississippi 
and Illinois Central Railroads, or Indianapolis, Terre Haute, and 
La Fayette, according to points of destination. 

Troops for Nebraska. Baltimore and Ohio Railroad to Bellaire or 
Parkersburg, Ohio River to Lawrenceburg, Ohio and Mississippi 
Railroad to Saint Louis, thence by river or rail, according to circum- 
stances. 

Troops for Michigan: Baltimore, Harrisburg, Pittsburg, Cleveland, 
Lake Erie, and Detroit. 

Troops for Northern Ohio and Northern Indiana: Baltimore, Har- 
risburg, Pittsburg, Pittsburg, Fort- Wayne and Chicago Railroad and 
connecting lines. 

Troops for Central Ohio: Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, Bellaire, 
Columbus. 

* For General Orders, No. 04 and Circular No. 19 (here omitted), see pp. 20 and 
24, ante. 



304 



C0BR£8P0m)ENC£, ETC. 



TrooxMS for Northern Illinois: Baltimore, Harrisbnrg, Pittsburg, 
Fort Wa3n[ie and Chicago, and connecting roads to points of destina- 
tion. 

TrooxM for Wisconsin : Baltimore, Harrisbnrg, Pittsburg, Cleveland, 
Lake Erie to Detroit, Grand Rapids, Milwaukee, and thence to different 
points of destination. 

Troops for Iowa: Baltimore, Harrisbnrg, Pittsburg, Pittsburg, Fort 
Wayne and Chicago Railroad to Chicago, thence by rail to Prairie du 
Chien, Dubuque, Fulton, Burlington, Keokuk, thence to points of 
destination. 

Troops for Minnesota: Baltimore, Harrisbnrg, Pittsburg, Pittsburg, 
Fort Wayne and Chicago Railroad to Chicago, thence by rail to 
nearest points of destination on the Mississippi River, thence by 
steamer. 

Troops for Pennsylvania: Baltimore, Harrisbnrg, Pittsburg, or 
Baltimore and Philadelphia and connecting roads. 

Troops for West Virginia: Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. 

Troops for New Jersey: Baltimore, Philadelphia, and Trenton. 

Trooi)6 for New York: Baltimore, Philadelphia, New York, Albany, 
or Baltimore, Harrisburg, and Ebnira, to points of destination. 

Troops for New England: Baltimore, Philadelphia, New York, 
thence by rail or water to points nearest their destination. 

In case of delay for want of boats at Bellaire or Parkersburg, troops 
to be sent so far as necessary by rail via Cincinnati. 

A special officer to be detailed for Bellaire or Parkersburg. Quar- 
termasters at other important points to be immediately advised of 
contemplated movements and instructed to make full preparation. 

Troops for the North and East to march to Baltimore, thence take 
rail to Harrisburg or Philadelphia. 

Troops for the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad to take the oars at 
Alexandria and go through by rail to the Ohio River. 

Estimate of troops in Army of the Potomac (induding Sixth Corpe) and Oen- 
eral Sherman's army vaihose term* wiU expire prior to Odoiber i, and now 
under orders for muster out. 



8til*M. 




j 


li 

11 


k 


J 




j 


ConiMetieat 


2 
2 

15 
13 
6 
« 
2 

e 

9 

6 
2 

6 
83 

11 
14 

1 
2 
7 


800 

800 
8,000 
8.200 
2.000 
2.400 

800 
2.400 
8.600 
2.000 

800 

tooo 

12.800 
4.400 
6.600 
400 
800 
2,800 


200 

60 

1.000 

2.000 


a\ 


140 


286 
800 


1,486 


DelAWM« 


LISO 


lUinoli 






7,000 


IniUan* 








7,100 


lowft 








2,000 


Maine 


400 
600 

2.000 
1.000 






884 

400 
4,004 
1,600 


8.784 

iItoo 


MurUnd 












8,404 


Miohinn 






6,100 


MlMonii 






2,000 
2; 545 

7 8^8 


ITftw TfftiDMhire 


200 
800 

6,000 

1.000 

4.000 

800 

700 

600 


1 
2 
6 


600 

1.200 
4,000 


1.046 
4,878 
16.000 


If6w JorMy .................................. 


NewYorkr. 


87.800 


Ohio 


6,400 


PAnOBVltTAlliA ......................... 


18 


9.000 


2,000 

141 

1.723 


SO 600 


RhfMl/rnlMd 


841 


VermoBt 






3.223 


WiMontin 






8.300 












Totol 


189 


S5.600 


20,180 


28 


14,810 


81,720 


122,310 







a BAtfcecv Artillery. 



UNION AUTHORITIES. 



305 



KBCAPfTITLATIOK. 

U9thra»'7flan*r«ffl]BeDtoofl882,«aohr0gliiieai4OO 66,800 

Tlme-TMri' rtenuto, 1802 20,160 

22oiM-5Mr*4re9imeDU. 1864. and 1 battery 14.840 

OB*-yeMr*a raeraita. 1864 31,720 

Totol 122,810 

Wab DvPABmsirr, AtuvrAHT-QEtnMAh'B Omcs, 

JToy 18. 1866. 

Exhibit of all volunteer troops in the service of the United States whose terms tnU 
expire prior to October J, 1866, now under orders to be mustered out of service. 



Ijl^lgJ 








II 


1 




i 


ConiMoiiciit • ..•««•«• •«■«•..•••■«....... 


7 
2 
90 
20 

• 

6 
4 
8 

10 
6 
8 

6 
42 
82 
18 
1 
4 
2 
7 


2.800 

800 

20,000 

10.400 

6.000 

1.200 

800 

2.000 

1.000 

8.200 

4.000 

2,000 

1,200 

2.400 

2.000 

16.800 

12.800 

7,200 

400 

2,800 


308 

00 
1,200 
2.600 

16 


al 

64 

2 


140 

240 

1,600 


166 

314 

"'mo' 

339 

4 

900 

2.129 
2.864 
1.247 

"'676' 
8,836 

18.173 
4.627 
7.028 
81 
1.723 
1.813 
2,017 


3 408 


IMaware 


1.414 


IIHdoIs 


28,800 


Indiana 


18.789 


Iowa -. — -• 






6.361 


Kinaat r 






1,204 


Kentoekv 


700 

461 

818 

8,921 

720 
602 
431 
360 

••ss 

1.800 

300 

1,000 






1.644 


iiSS:f^:""::::i::::::::;"":::::ii"::: 


64 


240 


3,430 


Maryland 


3,127 


Maaurhntetta 


«10 


1,880 


11.180 


litebinn 


8.264 


MittDMoCa 


1 
8 
(18 
2 
6 

17 
61 


800 
4.800 

480 
1,200 
4,000 
4.000 


4,6n 


HiMonri 


6.692 


Keir Haropaliire 


3^881 


New tTerMT 


6! 886 


New York 


47.973 


Ohio 


24,637 


PennsTlTania ......*............. ........... 


82,766 


Rhode Island 


1,041 


Vermont 


4.823 


WeatVlrfrinia 






L418 


Wiaconain *..• 


4 


2,000 


8.417 






Total 


287 


102,800 


38.673 


«80 


84,470 


49,400 


220.242 







a Battery. 
6Coai|Mnfea. 

• Twelve oompaniet of artillery and foar companlea of Infuitry. 
tf Serea eorapaniet of artillery and oneoompaoy of infantry. 

• One battery, tbirty-three oompanien, and rorty-ais rejtimenta. 
Hon.'Tbia iaelndea tbe Army of the Fotonao and General Shennan'a army. Tbe i 

tbeaa two armlea la 122,810. See estimate of May 18, 1806 [next, onto]. 

BECAPITULATIOM. 

297 fhiw.yMn'i«fflmento, 1982. eacb 400 men 102,800 

Thrae-yean' racnuta, 1802 33.672 

48r0gijiieata,S8com|Mnlee.and 1 battery, one-year't men, 1864 84,470 

One>year'sreeniita,1864 49.400 

Total 220,242 

WAB DBPABTlfBRT, AOJOTAirr-GDrBRAL'S OmcB, 

Jfay 59. 1K$. 

No. 34. 

Division of Regular Supplies, 

Quartermaster-General's Office, 
Washington, 2>. C, October 16, 1865. 
Maj. Gen. M. G. Meios, 

Quariermasier-Oeneral U. S. Armyy Washington, D. C: 
General: In compliance with instructions received from the 
Quartermaster-General, per circular July 24, 1865, I have the honor 
to submit the following report: 
I was appointed as chief of the division of regular supplies of the 

20 R R— SERIES III, VOL V 



306 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. 

Quartermaster-Generars Office, September 7, 1864, at which time I 
was on duty in the city of New York as purchasing officer of for^e for 
the entire armies of the East, together with depots on the sea-coast 
as far south as Mobile, Ala., and in part the depot of New Orleans. 

The importance of prompt supplies to the armies and depots above 
alluded to was deemed sufficient to justify my remaining in New 
York until January 1, 1865, at which time I assumed personally the 
supervision of the business of this division. 

From the date of my appointment as chief of this division until 
January 1, 1865, Bvt. Brig. Gen. Charles Thomas supervised the 
examination of contracts, and Col. B. C. Card the examination of 
claims connected therewith. 

Upon entering on duty in this office I at once opened record books 
of all existing contracts, carefully examining and entering all con- 
tracts made since, comparing prices therein with the market value of 
supplies at posts where the contracts were made, and directing the 
places at which contracts should be made, as the large demands 
upon certain markets rendered this necessary to prevent holders of 
supplies from taking advantage of the wants of the Government. 

Records have been kept of the quantities delivered upon contracts 
from month to month, canceling each contract at time of its expiration. 

Daily reports have been required from the principal depots of sup- 
ply, and weekly reports from all others, showing the quantities on 
hand, afloat to be received, and quantities due on contracts, keeping 
this office constantly informed relative to the state of supplies at all 
posts; enabling the Quartermaster-General to prevent the accumula- 
tion of large supplies when posts might be abandoned. 

The establishing of purchasing and contracting depots at prominent 
points where supplies are produced, or large accumulations are thrown 
upon the market, has greatly concentrated the business of this divis- 
ion, and the withdrawal of so many purchasing officers^ destroying 
the competition created by them when seeking supplies in the same 
market, has been of great advantage to the interests of the Govern- 
ment. 

CLAIMS. 

The records of this division show that from January 1, 1865, to 
date there have been received 6,852 claims, which have been acted on 
as follows: 



Number. 



SetUed 

Refected 

Sntpended aw .filing evidence. . 
Kotacted on 

Total 



1.266 f810.886La6 

1.379 I 553.623.95 

641 I 488,649.07 

3.666 I 1,248,812.37 



6.852 2,549,451.76 



The examination of these claims, especially those jJresented under 
act of July 4, 1864, has been critical in relation to the following points: 

First. As to the actual use by the Army of stores for which payment 
is claimed. 

Second. As to the past and present loyalty of the claimants and 
witnesses. 

Third. Whether the signatures of the certifying officera were gen- 
uine. 

Aft-er the above points have been considered the claims have been 
generally referred to the provost-ma I'shals of the districts where the 



UNION AUTHORITIES. 



807 



clAimonts reside for all additional information which was thought 
auxiliary to a just decision in each case. 

A very large number have been rejected on account of ascertained 
disloyalty of both claimants and witnesses. 

The procurement of supplies for the fiscal year has been made prin- 
cipally by contract at all depots of supplies, except those procured at 
New York City, up to January 1, 1865, where the quantities required 
under the exigencies of the service were such as to render it neces- 
sary to purchase in open market. 

Many purchases have been made by the officers in the field to sup- 
ply the demand on the march, of which this division has no informa- 
tion, nor can this information be obtained except by examination of 
all the official returns forwarded to the Quartermaster-Greneral. 

The quantities of stationery purchased and used by the Army it is 
impossible to obtain, as all contracts for the same show only the 
prices of articles, the quantities in all cases to be delivered as required. 
The official reports of officers receiving the stationery, which are too 
numerous for examination, are the only data by which it can be 
gained. 

The schedule annexed shows the quantities of forage and fuel 
delivered on contract, in which the deliveries are specified, and pur- 
chases made in open market, not including those made by officers in 
the field, for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1865. 

The contracts at all large purchasing depots have been made, in 
most cases, for quantities to be delivered as required, at prices 
named. The quantity received on this class of contracts cannot be 
ascertained from the contracts at present, but the aggregate must be 
much greater than that arrived at in Schedule A. 

The reason for making contracts of this kind was the impossibility 
of knowing what quantity would be required for the Army, dei)end- 
ing on the place of purchase, as well as to prevent the accumulation 
of supplies at posts which could be supplied to advantage from other 
points. 

Since the close of the war this mode of contracting has been 
adopted almost entirely, to prevent the accumulation of supplies at 
posts which would soon be abandoned. 

Very resjwctfuUy, your obedient servant, 

S. L. BROWN, 
CoLondy in Charge Regular Supplies. 

SBOULAR SUPPLIBB. 

A.-^<m9oHdated report of deliveries of forage and fuel on contracts specify- 
ing quantities, purchases in open market reported, and official reports received 
at Quartemumer's Department for fiscal year ending June SO, 1866, 





i 


i 


1. 

38,811 
10,000 


i 


i. 

Ton*. 
8.196 

2,442 
5,027 


I 

Ton*. 


1 


1 


i 


BcoeiTvd on oontnoto 


BHthOt. 
4,681. 847 

1.221.026 


Sutkett. 
•.97».829 

11.790.402 
8,06^600 


Tom. 
296,676 

111,124 


Ton*. 


Cord*. 
225.796 

110,378 


Ton*. 
176,880 

656,568 


tpeoifyiDg aniouDt 
to be deliTer«d. 

PoTBhaMd in open 
market. 

Anionnto reported re- 
oeiredbyofficenfor 
fbcAl yeer ending 
Jnne3a.l065.notin. 
elnded in the above. 


146 


614 
















Total 


6.»02,273 


28,704,930 


43,311 


407,799 


10,665 


146 


614 


386,169 


882.452 











808 COBBE8PONDENCE, BTC. 

ApproaoimaU fHUuaHon of artidu. 

Ooni«a*«*« ••«••*■•■••• <*•••• ••«•••«■•••• •«««•««••••••■••«•■■•••«••<• •••■•■••••••••••••••••■« 9wi*Hi«M 

Olrtt S8,7M,nO 

Bwl^y 64.997 

Hiy U»OI0,568 

8k»w tl3,SM 

Feed IW 

VMder Wl 

Wood 1,680,M5 

Oo^ ^ 8.384.510 

ToUI ImBMK 

No. 36. 

DivisiOK OF Regular Supplies, 
Quartermaster-General's Office, 
WasUrigUm, D. C, October 17, 186S. 
Bvt. Maj. Gen. M. C. Meigs, 

Quartermaster' Oeneral U. S, Army, Washingtony D. C: 

General: In compliance with General Orders, No. 39, Quarter- 
master-General's Office, July 1, 1865, I have the honor to submit tiie 
following as my personal report for tiie year ending June 30, 1865: 

My report for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1864, was transmitted 
to the Quartermaster-General November 28, 1864. 

At the commencement of the fiscal year of *1864-'65 I was on duty 
in the city of New York, under my commission as captain and assist- 
ant quartermaster, engaged in the purchase, procurement, and 
shipment of forage. 

September 7, 1864, in accordance with the law of July 4, 1864, reor- 
ganizing the Quartermaster's Department, I was assigned to duty in 
charge of the Fifth Division of the Quartermaster-General's Office, 
with the rank of colonel, to date from August 2, 1864. 

September 8, 1864, Special Orders, No. 298, Adjutant-General's Office, 
directed that I should turn over my property and duties in New York 
City, under such instructions as might be given me by the Quarter- 
master-General, and report in person to him and enter upon my 
duties as chief of the Fifth Division of the Quartermaster-General's 
Office. 

The fact that I was supplying forage for the entire armies of the 
East and the Atlantic and Gulf sea-coast depots, and the importance 
of keeping up the supply, in the opinion of the Quartermaster-GenenJ, 
justified my remaining in New York and giving my personal atten- 
tion to these shipments until January 1, 1865, at which time I reported 
in person to the Quartermaster-General and entered upon my duties 
as chief of the division of regular supplies of the Quartermaster- 
General's Office. 

Preparatory to my departure from New York City, Capt. E. D. 
Chapman, assistant quartermaster, was, by Special Orders, No. 395, 
Adjutant-General's Office, November 12, 1864, directed to repair at 
once to New York City — this order relieving him from duty at Saint 
Louis, Mo. — and relieve me from my duties as forage officer; and I 
was by the same order directed, on being relieved, to report to the 
Quartermaster-Creneral in person. 

December 20, 1864, I turned over to Captain Chapman all the 
quartermaster's property for which I was responsible, and, as before 
stated, entered upon my duties in charge of the Fifth Division of the 
Quartermaster-General's Office, where I still remain. 

The Schedules A, C, CC, D, and G, and the statement of public 
moneys called for by General Orders, No. 39, are hereto attached. 



UHIOK AUTHOBITIBa. 809 

No clothing or camp and garrison equipage having been in my pos- 
seesion dnring the fiscal year, the Schedule B has not been prepared. 
Schedules E and F, of property captured from the enemy, are not fur- 
nished, no such property having come under my control. 

My entire business as forage officer has been conducted by myself 
personally, no officer having ever been detailed to assist me. 
Very resi>ectf ully, your obedient servant, 

S. L. BROWN, 
Colondy Quartermaster's Department. 

No. 36. 
StcUement of public moneys for theJUcal year ending June 30, 1866, 

On hand July 1,18W $885,809.46 

Received from officers dnring the year 260,719.52 

Received from Treasury Department during the year 19,515,000.00 

Received from sales of property and other sources during the year. 80, 462. 82 

Total 20,641,551.80 

Expended duringthe year 19,544,851.44 

Transferred to officers during the year 860,500.00 

Remaining on hand June 80, 1865 246,699.86 

Total 20,641,551.80 

Balance on hand is deposited as follows : 

U.S. Treasury certificates 204,871.20 

Cash 89,841.61 

National Bank of Commerce 2,665.76 

First National Bank of Washington, D. C 821.29 

Total 246,699.86 

I certify that the above statement is ooirect. 

S. L. BROWN, 
CoUmet, Quartermaeter^B Department. 

No. 37. 

Q.— Statement of amount paid on a/oeount of raU, river, stage, and wagon tran^ 
portation by Col, S, L, Broum, Quartermaster's Department, during the fiscal 
year ending June SO, 1863, 





Tianaportatlos. 




^^•*^«^- pbS^ 


8ta«M. 


W.^ 


f^MMMMienni -^fTiliant 


$1,888.10 ' 






FreighF. 


848. 774. 7« $1, 910, OOOl 64 




921 061.86 








Total 


250,067.86* 1,910,000.64 
1.684.68 1 0,710.00 




21,061.96 


Bxpendltuzva 










Qmiil total 


268,282.44 1 1,918.800.64 




21,061.96 







JLfXZVgate 62, 108,145.04. 

I certify that the above statement is correct. 



S. L. BROWN, 
Cokmd, Quartermaster's Department. 



810 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. 

No. 38. 

CC.— Statement of amount paid on account of ocean and lake transportation 
by Cci, 8. L. Brown, Quartermaster's Department , during the fiscal year ending 
June SO, 1866, 

Freight $1,890,109.46 

Ezpenditnres 9,710.00 

Total 1,899,810.46 

I certify that the aboye statement is correct. 

S. L. BROWN, 
Colonel, Quartermaster*s Department, 

No. 39. 

D,— Statement of aU troops and stores transported by Col, 8, L, Brown, Quarter- 
master's Department, during the fiscial year ending June SO, 1866, 





a^'i! 

iaas. 


QnartamiM. 
tar*« stofM. 


7^iilln>ft4¥ r 


1,773 


IVnu. IM. 
81,503 


StAMn-boftte. bftrmn. Ac 


378,546 788 


8fill£M 






Wiigoni, &o • .............. T. ........ X 




128,* 475 1, 801 










1,778 


478,534 






Owned ©r mn by Gorernmwit: 

RailrMdi .r ., ... 


























'" 


.......... 


Omul total 


1.773 


478,^4 







I certify that the above statement is correct. 

S. L. BROWN, 
CoUmd, Quartermaster's Department, 

No. 40. 

Report of quantity and approximate valuation of forage shipped to armies on 
the James Mioer during the winter of l864-*66. 



MontlK 



1864. 



Bber . 
»ber.... 
NoTember.. 
Deoember.. 



1806. 



Jannaxy... 
FebnuuT . 

liaroh 

April 



Total. 



Corn. 



78,087 
189,002 
118,3561 

41,780 



21,250 
86,235 
83.583 
88,820 



588,0801 



Oato. 



ButKdt. 

1,237,972 
506.166 
540, 6i5 
456,886 



736.588 



488.018 
506,859 



5,244.118 



Hay. 



Tong, 
9.641.12 
5,515.00 
5,841.13 
8,280.80 



5,084.80 
3.766.15 
5,800.00 
11,011.11 



54,441.50 



Straw. 



Tons, 
410.80 
452.18 
180.17 
119.20 



76.40 
111.13 
147.16 
239.00 



1.6 



.19 



Approzinata 
▼alaatlon. 



$1,877,336.92 

1,048,234.77 

964,261.00 

«a,611.39 



1,154.628.08 
800,153.91 
976.894.28 

1,229.513.70 



9,173,534.00 



And 90,547 tona of ooal, oostlng $1,009.21 

I certify that the above report is correct. 

S. L. BEOWN, 
Colonel, in Charge Division of Eeffular Supplies. 

Quabtbrmasteb-Gbnebal's Office, 

Washington, D, C, October 26, 1866, 



UKION AUTHORITIES. 



311 



No. 41. 

Statement of the eost of transportation of grain delivered at etcUione on the 
plaina by eontraetors, ana the transportation being a part of the price. 



From Fort Leavenwortb to~ 



Cost of trmoa* 

portatlon per 

IDO pounda per 

lOOmllM. 



S 



6 



OlAthe 

PaoU 

Foit Soott 

FortZarah 

FortLyoo 

Fort Lamed 

Camp FiUmore . 



Omaha 

FortKearnr... 
Cotton wooa.... 

Jalesburg 

Talley Station. 

CoUine 

Fort Laramie.. 
FortHalleok... 

Denver ..■ 

CaBon City 
inDoi 



iroa. 

H 
125 
252 
510 

287 



Camp SanDom. . . 

DakoUCity 

Pavnee Agency . 
Lavrenoe 



9lt 
488 
626 
693 

620 

760 

683 

608 

• 108 

clOO 

cll7 



Found$. 
8,860,000 
8,860.000 
5.860,000 

906,800 
1,848,000 

280,000 
1,008,000 

840,000 
1,120,000 
1.120,000 
1.120.000 
1,120.000 

560.000 
2,520.000 

660.000 
8,120.000 

886.000 
1,680,000 

448,000 

896.000 

840,000 



(6) 

12.26 
2.26 
2.26 
2.26 
2.26 
2.20 
2.26 
2.26 



12.06 
2.05 
2.05 
2.05 
2.05 
2.05 
2.05 

(») 



$43,804.40 
64.747.20 

137,600.00 
61.404.69 

193,208.40 
16,473.80 

190,188.20 



(d) 



2.05 
2.05 
2.05 
2.05 
(d) 



72,892.32 

96.549.12 
123,016.32 
133, 141. 12 

87.7(t6.08 
858,102.40 

94,915.00 
1,258,386.36 

55,068.24 
240,881.20 

10,010.56 
8,058.96 



Total. 



36,982,800 



>.87 



a607,lOL( 



e2, 626, 727. 68 



a Route No. 2. 

h No tranaportation ; com delivered at 426.256. 

Batimated dlatance. 

dNo tranaportation i com delivered at 929.700. 

• Boate No. 1. 



A trae exhibit. 



S. L. BROWN, 
Colonel, in Cliarge of Fifth Division. 



No. 42. 

Division op Regular Supplies, 

Quartermaster-General's Office, 
Washington, D. C, October 30, 1866. 
Maj. Gen. M. C. Meigs, 

Qitartermaster-Oeneral, Washington, D. C: 
General : As requested in your circular of July 24, 1865, I have 
the honor to submit the following report of the operations of the 
Quartermaster's Department in the procurement of regular supplies 
during the past four years of war: 

To obtain a complete statement of the quantity of forage, fuel, and 
stationery purchased it will be necessary to make an analysis of the 
returns of all officers of the Quartermaster's Department, which can- 
not be done at present. 

Reports have been received from some of the most prominent offi- 
cers engaged in the purchase of forage and fuel. 

The purchases of other officers by contract, where quantities to be 
delivered are stated, have been collected from the contracts on file. 



312 



C0RUE8P0NDENCE, ETC. 



The material thus obtained is collated in Schedule A, of which the 
following is a brief summary: 





Quantity. 


Coat. 


Ck>ni 


basbols.. 


22,816,271 

78,663,799 

1.518.621 

21,276 

551,436 

1,620.910 


929,879,314.61 

76.382,026.83 

4t. 595. 872. 00 

425 530 00 


Oftto 


do... 


Ffty 


tons.. 


SSw ::;::;::::::::::::::;;;::::::::::;:";: 


do 


Wood 


ooida.. 


S.757,1M>.00 


Coia 


tflna.. 


18.777.735.00 


Stationery (aPDroximate) 


2,071 290 00 










ToW 


174.368,847.84 







Although this is an immense quantity of supplies, it does not cover 
the full consumption, as many contracts, especially for straw, wood, 
and coal, call for deliveries *'as required;" hence quantities pur- 
chased under these contracts are not included in Schedule A, nor are 
the quantities of forage and fuel purchased on the march included. 

The stationery purchased could not be ascertained, and nothing but 
its approximate cost is stated in the schedule. 

To show the operations of a single depot, the reports of General D. 
H. Rucker, showing issues of the dex)ot of Washington during the 
war, are inclosed, marked B and C, from which it appears that ^e 
issues of that depot from May 1, 1861, to October 1, 1865, were: Corn, 
241,633,972 pounds, or 4,314,892 bushels; oats, 924,273,963 pounds, or 
28,883,500 bushels; mixed grain, 19,049,151 pounds, or 432,935 bushels; 
hay, 982,163,849 pounds, or 491,081 tons; straw, 30,681,907 pounds, or 
15,349 tons; coal, 877,992,141 pounds, or 391,900 tons; wood, 209,846 
cords. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

S. L. BROWN, 
Colondy in Charge RegiUar Supplies. 

No. 43. 



K.— Approximate statement of purchases of regular supplies during four years of 
war ending June 30, 1865, 


Kamea of parchaaing offlcara. 


Corn. 


Oata. 


Hay. 


Straw. 


Wood, 


GoaL 


Mai. Oen. n. H. Rackar 


BuMkelt. 

1.848.480 

8.884,173 

98.112 

1,760,922 

1,229.885 

821.088 

191.061 


ButluU. 
10,^,482 
28.234.423 
1.732,828 
17,929.990 
2,815.287 
8,025.457 
2.023.888 
201.050 
2.388.722 


2Vm«. 

228.501 

877,518 
32,074 

289.814 
88.083 
81.097 
40.884 
5,004 
88,848 


Tom. 
8,884 


Oordt. 
184,567 


fVna. 
85,301 


Mai G«n R. Allan 




Brig. God. S. Van Vliat 






168.842 


Col. 8. L. Brown a 


8,198 
2.2U2 
1.280 
1,812 






Cul. Jamea Belgvr 


85,317 


50.627 


Cant B. D. ChaDmanb 




Cant. S D.Burchard 






Capt W Holt 






Captaiiit MoCliing'and Phelpa, Cln- 

ciDnati. Ohio. 
Col W W McKim 


8,084.«78 












888. 588 


CadI. JttmeA Brooka 












238,193 


Other ofttcera, a« per oontraots on fila 
in Quartarmaater-Genaral'* Ofllce. 


8.832,^ 


11.781.888 403.070 


8.125 


381.582 


890,914 


Total 


22,818,271 


78,863,799 1.518.621 


21.278 


561,438 


1,689,010 






• 





a This dooM not include purchaaea made bj Colonel Brown nndar General Rnoker'e ordera. 
6 Thia does not indnde pnrohaaes made by Captain Chapman under General AUen't ordera. 

APPROXIMATE VALUATION.* 

I certify that the above statement is correct. 

S. L. BROWN. 
Colonel. Quartermaster's Department, 



* Omitted. Embodied in Brown to Meigs, next, ante. 



UNIOH AUTHOBITIES. 
No. 44. 



818 



B.— iSimtiNory MUUement of the amount of forage received, iseued, and trantferred 
at the depot of WaMkgUm by auiutant quartermastere einee May l, 1861, 

BXUBIYED. 



AbttTMtD. 



HiV. 



FoiMivtoAt D, O, 



Oipt.B.L.H«rte 

^t.J.J.l>tti* 

CftpC & L.BMwn 

Gkpt.X.aAlln 

0»pl.&B.LMftr.... 



PMMdf. 

1. MS. 880 



11,168.184 



J pu n i b. 



17,6<8.141 



Povndf. 
1,060,878 



44,481.084 



80,878,488 
87.7S4.884 






CftptJ.O.CUe 

CaptT.O.WliTtel... 
Gbpfc.LN.Bodfc 



18^804,887 
90,488.2» 



87,101,888 
187,817,844 



10. 



8,788^822 



St 887,184 



8,700,014 



117.041,688 
80,848,844 
1,888^847 



48,187.880 

817,880.888 

88.800 

81.766.088 



8,118,888 

1,888.6a 

708, 7U 



468.188 
460,141 



40,000 



Total . 



98.a0i.887 888.878.480 14.074.884 



468,008,868 7,788.788 



AtetrMtoBudK. 



Oom. 



Iflxed 
fzalB. 



H.J. 



D,0. 



OiVtS-I^HsTta 

UptJ.J.DMM 

(;^t.J.M.Ro1»lnM«. 

OM»t.& L. Brown 

Cftpt.K&AllBa 

G»pt.f&.B.L»iiff»r.... 



Poimdf. 

6.888,878 

^7.688,867 



18.808.180 
•77.767.678 



PMMdf. 



POMMTt. 

86.067.066 
•110.406,601 



Pmmd§, 
1,8881668 
•4,86l»018 



AUammdfia, Ym, 



CtDt. C. B. Vtenwoa . 
CntW.Stod&id... 



Ci9«.T.O.Wlijtal. 
Q^LKBiMk... 

Total 



11.177.748 
41,886.407 
10.168,688 



8. 180c 706 

SlSSl 
U; 478, 080 
1.860,188 



14,880^088 
818.660.842 
00,841,846 



10lll8.m 
10.071,066 
20,874,084 
118.078,664 
28.446.861 



1,860,888 



87.687 
8.688,887 



148.017.617 
87.722.648 



8.800,641 
6,888,406 
20,073,406 
06.U6,804 
17,848.281 



1,874,001 
7,888.188 
8,070,788 



48.788 

61,616 

488.060 

1,702,808 

602,778 



161,686,776 611,717,877 



• AlwtrMta D, B, and B. 



4.974.817 



638,186,486 



81,810,072 



814 



CORRESPOXDEXCE, ETC. 



No. 4L-^B.— Summary wtatement of the amount of faraqt rectxotdy iatdud^ taiA 
troMferrtd at the depot of Wcuhtngton by aseUfant quariermasten nnee May 
i, I^tfi— ContinnecL 

ISSVIED. 



I of ottcon. 



▲iMtnwto G, H. L, and IC. 



Corn. 



Mizod 
giain. 



Bmj, 



Slraw. 



WtMnglon, D. O. 



GA^B.L.H«rte 

CftptJ.J.Dan* 

Gopi. J. M. RoUnton . 
Gapt 8. L. Brown .... 

Gi9tB.&AUen 

Capt a B. Lanftr . . . . 



CtotCB-ForraaoD . 
CaptW.8tod&rd... 

CaptJ.O.CLM 

OH»t.T.O.Whjtia... 
Capt L v. Back 



Poundt. 
7,660,168 
47,588,807 



Pounds, 

81.189.474 

77.767,678 



Pmmdt, 



48.740,006 
110.408,661 



67.817.165 
42.186,808 
10,118,796 



84.881.808 
87,886,044 
6,619.870 
18,731.316 
909.076 



96.867,127 
839.286.826 
84,888.188 



86.083,076 
177,688,700 

26,208.106 
188.406.807 

21.061,188 



1,860.988 



10, 366, 320 

07.667 

7,836.241 



168,126,004 
168.861,261 
86,881.764 



66.108.618 
228.008,227 
24,288.470 
86,876,030 
16,824.763 



Total 841,633,072 



024.878,968 



19,048.161 I 082.103.848 



Powub. 

8,888,881 
4,888,0U 



7.280.888 
9.121.716 
8.667,88 



510.175 
821«6S7 

1,748,'888 



80,681.807 



SBCAPITULATIOK. 



Abatncto. 


Ooni. 


Data. 


Mizod 

grain. 


Hay. 


Straw. 


BaoelTod: 

AbatraotD 

Abatraoto £ and K 


Poundi, 
02,203.207 
161,606,776 


PoiMUb. 
886,075.430 
611.717.877 


Paundt. 
14.074.334 
4.974,817 


Pound*. 
463.002,852 
632,106,486 


Pound: 

7, 729,728 
21,810.072 






Total 


243,800.048 
241.033,978 


048.602,807 
994,273.968 


19, 049. 161 ' 08S. 107. 837 


29.630.800 


iMoad: Abatiaoto G, H, L. and M. . . 


19.040,161 


062,168.848 


80,081.007 



I certify that the abore statement is as correct a compilation as can be made from 
reports receiyed at this oflBbe and {Mtpers which are now accessible at the depot. 

D. H. RUCKER, 
Brevet Major-Qeneral and Chief Quartermaster^ Depot of WaMnffton, 

No. 45. 

C,—<}on9olidated etatement of the quantity of fuel received, issued, and transferred 
at the depot of Waehington by assistant quartermasters since May 1, 1861. 





Beceived. 


laaned and trana. 
ferxed. 


Station, and naaea of ottoois. 


AbatraotD. 


AbatraetaBandN. 


AbatraeU P. L. 
andM. 




Coal. 


Wood. 


Coal. 


Wood. 


Coal. 


Wood. 


WaMngUm, D. 0. 
Cant. S. L. Harta 


Pounds. 
27,561.787 
38.161.680 

14,280.110 
8,340,330 


Oords. 
78.081 
8.160 

48,400 


204.111.002 
80,646,610 

107,346.040 
386,230,816 


Cords. 
62.741 
7.672 

8.088 

S0.S70 


Pounds, 

231,063,680 
118,688,180 

174,408.066 
868,888.187 


Oords. 
130,772 


Ci9t.Jainea M.Moore 


14,722 

40,400 
28,862 


AUtumdria^Ta 


B^. Lieut CoL'Sr. G. C. Lee 








TWal 


77.282,013 


134.687 


838, 244, 170 M. OfTi 


877.802.141 


808.846 









UNION AUTHORITIES. 315 

No. 45.— C.—OtmaoiMiaf«i statement of the quanUiy of fvud reeeioed^ i$med, and 
irangferred at the d^ot of Washington by cuHetant quartennastera since May 
i, i^i— Gontinned. 

BBCAPITULATIOV. 



Abitneto. 


GoiO. 


Wood. 


BoodTOd: 

AbAtraotD 


n,S8S,n8 
08,M4,17« 


Cbr4f. 

134,867 


AbotnusU K and N 


tKoN 






Totel 


916.037,010 


ns,o0i 


iMMdi AbotrMStsF. L. oadM 


Smb 







I certify that the above statement is as correct a compilation as can be made 
from reports received at this office and {Mtpers which are now accessible at the 

depot 

D. H. BUCKEB, 
Brevet Major-Oeneral and Chief Quartermaster, Dqpot of Washington, 

No. 46. 

QUABTBRMASTEil-GBNERAL'S OFFICE, 

Washington, D. C, October 16, 1865. 
Bvt. M^. Gen. M. C. Meigs, 

QwjHermasteT'OeneraL U. S. Army: 

General: In compliance with your oircnlar of July 24, 1865,.deeir^ 
ing reports ot the operations of the several divisions of this office 
during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1865, Aa, I have the honor to 
report as to the Sixth Division: 

That the most costly structures which have been erected by the 
Quartermaster's Department during the period above mentioned 
were for hospital purposes. The most important are hospitals at 
Indianapolis, Ind. ; Newark, N. J. ; Worcester, Mass. ; Manchester, 
N. H. ; Baltimore, Md. ; Nashville, Tenn., and enlargement of hospital 
at Hilton Head, S. 0. 

Under provisions of General Orders, No. 24, Quartermaster-Gen- 
eral's Office, April 29, 1865, construction and extension of all bar- 
racks, hospitals, and other buildings ceased. But few special cases 
were reported in which continuance of work was ordered under para- 
graph yn of above-mentioned order. 

With the reduction of the trooxMS, hospitals, barracks, Ac, were 
from time to time reported upon as vacant by the chief quartermas- 
ters of departments or by duly authorized inspectors. Recommenda- 
tions to the Secretary of War for the sale of such public buildings as 
were no longer required for the service have been made, and, when 
authorized, the buildings have been sold at public sale after due 
notice by advertisement. I proposed to present a tabular statement 
of the original cost and of the amount received from the sales of 
public buildings erected during the war, btit at present this office 
does not possess the requisite data to prepare such a statement. 

The attention of the chief quartermasters of military divisions has 
been called to the failure on the part of some of their subordinates 
to comply with the requirements of General Orders, No. 3, Quarter- 
master-General's Office, 1864, and it is hox>ed that the material for a 
satisfactory and complete report of all hospitals, barracks, store- 
houses, Ac, may soon be collected, from which an accurate state- 
ment of the number, cost, and proceeds of sale of such structures, as 



316 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. 

also of the amount of rents paid for bnildings used for the public 
service, may be prepared. It was proposed to obtain this information 
in part from the investigations of the offtcers recommended to examine 
the accounts of officers of this department at the Treasuiy. 

The work connected with the consideration of claims and questions 
arising from the occupation of grounds and buildings for the pur- 
XXMes of the military service occupies the attention of my assistant, 
Bvt. CoL J. B. Howard, TJ. S. Volunteers, and of four of the five clerks 
acting under my supervision. Since the organization of the Sixth 
Division 2,479 claims of this character have been presented, amounting 
to (1,587,181.47, of which 751 have been referred to the Tieasury or to 
officers of this department for settlement, amounting to (183,452.30; 
1,054 have been rejected, amounting to $446,163.32, and claims (674) 
to the amount of 1957,565.85 still await examination and final action. 

Apart from the cost of construction and proceeds of sales of public 
buildings the operations of this division can hardly be tabulated. 
The correspondence incident to its oi>erations is extensive and varied, 
and the want of office room only prevents me from applying for, or 
employing on my own report of persons, several additional clerks for 
the more speedy disposition of current business. 

The examination of reports of officers of this department relative 
to payment of commutation of fuel and quarters should, I think, be 
made in this division, as decisions on the validity of orders entitling 
officers to such allowance, together with the questions incident 
thereto, demand special investigation. 

A statement of the number of interments registered during the 
war, white and black, loyal and disloyal, so far as reports have been 
received at this office under General Orders, No. 40, Quartermaster- 
General^s Office, 1865, is respectfully submitted herewith. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. J. DANA, 
Cclonelj QuaHermaster^s Department^ U. S. Army. 

Genbrai. Orders, ) Quartermaster-General's Office, 

No. 40. ) Washington, D, C, JuLy S, 1866. 

Officers of the Quartermaster's Department on duty in charge of 
the several principal posts will report to this office without delay the 
number of interments registered during the war, white and black, 
loyal and disloyal, to be separately enumerated. 

All officers of the Quartermaster's Department who have made inter- 
ments on battle-fields during the war will rei>ort the number of the 
same, giving the localities, dates of battles, and dates of interments. 

M. C. MEIGS, 
Q^arier7nasier'C^€nerdly Brevet Major-Oenerdl. 



UNION AUTHORITIES. 



817 



No. 47. 

Statement of the number of intermente regietered during the war, tehite and 
biack, loyal and diOoyal, eo far a$ reparis have been received at this office 
under General Orders, No, 40, Quartermaeter-Oenerare Qffiee, 186S, 



Beport 
of tater- 



! 



MlMoml. 



IndlMiA. 
Ohio. 



PaonsylTaai* 

MaaMcbiueiU 

Diatrtetof ColoiDbU.. 

UvyUod 

Kratoeky 

Luaislasft 

NewTork 

Couneetioat 

Rhode IftUmd 

VirglBia 

Booth CaroliBA 



AaderaoBTiJU.. 
SpoUjlYuda.. 
Wfldenuws 



StyK. 14 

Alia M 
AuiT 19 
Arpt 19 
Au^. 15 
AtJH 1* 
J»lv SI 
Ari^rie 
A(i^ 1ft 
A1ifc^ » 
Anc 7 
Jtjiv SB 
Aiiic 9 
July 27 
Aof. U 
8n»t. 6 



Ool n 

}oot n 



186ft. 
Aof . ft 
Ang. 1 
Ang. 1 
Aug. 1 
Aug. 1 
Aog. 1 
Ang. 1 
July 19 
July 20 
Ang. 1 
Aug. 1 
Ang. 1 
June 80 
Aog. 1 
JnlT 1 
Ang. 1 
Aug. 14 



Oet - 
Oet - 



10.686 

11,718 

8,006 

1.388 

148 

866 

888 

18.847 

ft, 666 

8,778 

7,441 

8,140 

188 

888 

8,808 

648 

10.086 



18,918 
1,600 



887 

819 

07 

8 



8,068 
6,786 
71 
64 
86 
808 
681 
186 



10,180 
6,776 
8.926 

1.181 

149 

843 

281 

17,488 

8,676 

8,538 

18.961 

8.000 

88ft 

8ft8 

4.076 

1,886 

10.077 



18.818 
1.600 



1,888 
6,161 
8,147 



687 
1.488 



U 



474 



876 

211 

1 

6 

86 

6 

184 



10 



106 



1.067 



18.1S6 

18,778 

8,078 

1.841 

148 

866 

881 

17.907 

6.816 

8.887 

18,887 

8,211 



4.2 

1.8 
II. I 



18,818 
1,608 



Total. 



86,808 



J6.280 



86,837 



13,696 



4,186 



116.148 



Total Biunbor of whites intarred 96,808 

ToUl number of bleoka Interred 28,846 

I certify that the faregcAmc ia a oorrect abetract of reports reoeiTed at this office 
under Qeneral Orders, Ko. 40, Qaarteniia0ter<}eiieral's OfBce, 1865, and on q;>eGial 
reports of Captain Moore. 

J. J. DANA. 
Colonel, Quartermatier^e Department. 

No. 48. 

Extract from annual report of Capt J. M, Moore, assistant quoHer- 
master, U, S. Army, for the year ending June SO, 1866. 

WASHmOTON, D. O. 

« 41 41 41 41 41 41 

The charge of the National Cemeteries and bnrial of deceased sol- 
diers and others dying in the service of the United States in hospitals 
in and about Washington is under the jurisdiction of this office, and 
is probably the most important of my si)ecialties. It was deemed 
advisable at the expiration of the burial contract, December 31, 1863, 
for the Government to manufacture all the coffins required for inter- 
ments in the National Cemeteries, as well as those needed for ship- 
ment to distant x)oints. The coffins now issued cost less than one-half 
the price paid by contract and are far superior. The hearses used 
for transportation to the graves are covered ambulances, painted 
black, and are well suited for the purpose. The tablets or head- 
boards are principally of white pine, with the exception of some 
4,000 of black wamuti purchased more than two years ago. They 



318 CORBIi^SPONDBNCB, ETC. 

are jiainted in white and lettered in black, with the name, company, 
regiment, and date of death. I would here remark that unless tab- 
lets are painted before lettering the wood will absorb the oil in the 
Iiaint and the rain soon wash off the lead in the lettering. 

By much iiains and labor I have succeeded in prei>aring a mortuaiy 
record for future reference, giving a succinct history of the deceased, 
every page of which has been comjiared with the records of hospitals, 
and up to the present date believed to be the most reliable register 
of the dead extant. Information is daUy furnished to numerous 
friends respecting deceased soldiers, and frequently before it can be 
obtained elsewhere, as the record is always kept up to date, no matter 
how great may be the mortality. 

In accordance with Sp^ial Orders, No. 132, headquarters Middle 
Military Division, WasMngton, D. C, June 7, 1865, I proceeded to 
the battle-fields of the Wilderness and Si)otsylvania Ck>urt-Hou8e for 
the purpose of superintending the interments of the remains of Union 
soldiers yet unburied and marking their burial places for future iden- 
tification. This work was commenced on the 12th and completed on 
the 24th of that month. Careful search was made over the above- 
mentioned battle-fields, and the remains of all soldiers, both Union 
and rebel, interred, and headboards, with name, rank, and regiment, 
placed at each grave (with some exceptions in cases of rebels) when 
it was x>ossible to identify the deceased. The words *' Unknown U. S. 
soldiers, killed May 10, 1864," on a neat tablet, mark the remains of 
our own soldiers that could not be identified. 

On the battle-ground of the Wilderness two cemeteries are laid out, 
inclosed by a paling fence. Cemetery No. 1 is on the Orange Court- 
House turnpike, about two miles from the Wilderness Tavern, and 
contains the remains of 108 men. Cemetery No. 2 is on the Orange 
Court-House plank road, about two miles and a half from the junc- 
tion of the Orange Court-House turnpike, and contains 534 men. 
The sites are well adai^ted for the resting-places of those who fell in 
the vicinity, having b^n selected where the carnage appeared to be 
the greatest. 

It was no unusual occurrence to observe the bones of our men close 
to the abatis of the enemy; and in one case several skeletons of our 
soldiers were found in their trenches. The bones of these men were 
gathered from the ground where they fell, having never been interred, 
and by exi>osure to the weather foj^ more than a year all traces of their 
identity were entirely obliterated. 

On the battle-field of Spotsylvania but few men were found unbur- 
ied, many of them having been interred by a Mr. Sanford, who 
resides at Spotsylvania Court-House, in compliance with an agree- 
ment to that effect with General Sherman while on his march to 
Washington City. Over 700 names were found in this battle-field, 
and tablets erected in memory of the deceased. 

It was my intention to remove those partly buried to a suitable site 
for a cemetery, but the weather being exceedingly warm, and the 
unpleasant odor from decayed animal matter was so great as to make 
the removal impracticable. They were, however, carefully recovered 
with earth and entirely hidden from view. 

Hundreds of graves on these battle-fields are without any mark 
whatever to designate them, and so covered with foliage that the 
visitor will be unable to find the last resting-places of those who have 
lallen until the rains and snows of winter wash from the surface the 
light covering of earth and expose their remains. 



UNION AUTHOSITIEB. 819 

The work on the cemetery in the vicinity of Old Soldiers' Home has 
been completed, the ground refenced, a neat and handsome lodge 
erected, a gaiden laid ont, the graves sodded, the walks graveled, 
and choice flowers and trees planted. 

Great care and attention have also been paid to the Harmony Burial 
Ground, where all soldiers dying of infectious diseases, and contra- 
bands, are interred. 

The improvement of the National Cemeteries has been a source of 
great gjratification to all who visit them, and entirely dissipates the 
prevai&ng opinion of those living remote from Washington that 
soldiers were irreverently or carelessly buried. 

At Arlin^n Cemeteiy a new road has been made by leveling, in 
part, tiie hiU on the south side of the mansion, by bridging small 
streams and by grading and ditching from the mansion, where it 
commences, to the new lodge on the Alexandria road, where it ends. 
A large number of well-selected shade trees and choice flowers have 
been planted, the gardens on both sides of the mansion improved 
and refenced, and the graves sodded; indeed, the place so trans- 
formed as hardly to be recognized by persons who had previously 
visited it. 



Number of deoUh$ reported from August J, 1864, to June 30, 1S6S.* 

[July 1, 1865.— Report of Capt. James M. Moore of burials on the 
battle-fieldiS of the Wilderness and Spotsylvania (here omitted) is 
embodied in the extract from his annual report, p. 318.] 

Graves of Union prisoners ai AndersonviUe. — Report of Captain 

Moore. 

Washington, Wednesday^ October 18y 1865. 
The following report of Capt. J. M. Moore, assistant quartermaster, 
who was sent to Andersonville, Ga., to mark the graves of Union 
prisoners for future identification, contains valuable information, in 
which the people are interested, and will doubtless be appreciated by 
the relatives and friends of those who have given their lives to thebr 
country: 

AssT. Quabtbrmaster's Office, Dspt. of Washdioton, 

WashiTigUm^ D. C, September BO, 1866. 
Bvt. Maj. Gen. M. C. Meios, 

Qiiarternuister' General U. S. Army, Washington, D. C: 
Gbnbbal: In accordance with Si)ecial Orders, No. 19, Quarter- 
master-Greneral's Office, dated June 30, 1865, directing me to proceed to 
Andersonville, Ga., for the purx>OBe of marking the graves of Union 
soldiers for future identification and inclosing the cemetery, I have 
the honor to report as follows: 

I left Washington on the 8th of July last with mechanics and 
materials for the purposerabove mentioned. 

On my arrival at Savannah I ascertained that there was no railroad 
communication whatever to Andersonville, the direct road to Macon 
being broken and that from Augusta via Atlanta also in the same 

*For statement (here omitted) see pp. 2(HMM3, of ExeontiYe Doouoent No. 1, 
to which referenoe is made in foot-note (*) p. d48. 



820 00BBE8P0NDENCE, ETC. 

oondition. I endeavored to procttre wagon transportation, bnt was 
informed by the general commanding the Department of Georgia that 
a snffident number of teams conld not be had in the State to hanl 
one-half of my stores, and as the roads were bad and the distance 
more than 400 miles, I abandoned all idea of attempting a route 
through a country dijflicult and tedious under more propitious* cir- 
cumstances. 

The prospect of reaching Andersonville at this time was by no 
means favorable, and nearly one week had elapsed since my arrival at 
Savannah. I had telegraphed to Augusta, Atlanta, and Macon almost 
daily, and received replies that the railroads were not yet completed. 

At length, on the morning of the 18th of July, the gratifying tele- 
gram from Augusta was received announcing the completion of the 
Augusta and Macon road to Atlanta, when I at once determined to 
procure a boat and proceed to Augusta by the Savannah River. The 
desired boat was secured, and in twenty-four hours after the receipt 
of the telegram alluded to was on my way with men and material for 
Augusta. On my arrival there I found the railroad completed to 
Macon, and that from Macon to Andersonville having never been 
broken, experienced little difQculty in reaching my destination, where 
I arrived July 25, after a tiresome trip, occupying six days and 
nights. 

At Macon, Major-Qeneral Wilson detailed one comi>any of the 
Fourth XT. S. Cavalry and one from the One hundred and thirty- 
seventh Regiment XT. S. Ck>lored Troops to assist me. A member of 
the former company was killed on the 5th of August at a station 
named Montezuma, on the Southwestern Railroad. 

The rolling-stock of all the roads over which I traveled is in a mis- 
erable condition, and very seldom a greater rate of speed was obtained 
than twelve miles an hour. At the different stations along the route 
the object of the expedition was well known, and not unfrequently 
men wearing the garb of rebel soldiers would enter the cars and dis- 
cuss the treatment of our prisoners at Andersonville, aU of whom 
candidly admitted it was shameful, and a blot on the escutcheon of 
the South that years would not efface. 

While encamped at Andersonville I was daily visited by men from the 
surrounding country, andhad an opportunity of gleaning their feelings 
toward the Gk>vemment, and with hardly an exception found those 
who had been in the rebel army i>enitent and more kindly disposed 
than those who have never taken a part, and anxious to again IxMsome 
citizens of the Government which they fought so hard to destroy. 

On the morning of the 26th of July the work of identifying the 
graves, punting and lettering the headboards, laying out the walks, 
and inclosing the cemetery was commenced, and on the evening of 
August 16 was completed, with the exceptions hereafter mentioned. 

The dead were found buried in trenches, on a site selected by the 
rebels, about 900 yards from the stockade. The trenches were from 
two to three feet below the surface, and in several instances, where 
the rains had washed away the earth, but a few inches. Additional 
earth was, however, thrown on the graves, making them of still greater 
depth. 

So close were they buried, without cofins or the ordinary clothing 
to cover 'their nakedness, that not more than twelve inches was aUo^^ 
to each man; indeed, the little tablets marking their resting-place, 
measuring hardly ten inches in width, almost touching each other. 



UNION AUTHORITIES. 82 L 

n. S. soldiers while prisoners at Andersonville had been detailed 
to inter their companions, and by a simple stake at the head of each 
grave, which bore a number con*esponding with a similar-numbered 
name upon the AndersonviUe hospital record, I was enabled to 
identify and mark with a neat tablet, similar to those in the ceme- 
teriea at Washington, the number, name, rank, regiment, Ac, and 
date of death, of 12,461 graves, there being but 451 which bore the 
inscription *' Unknown U. S. soldiers." 

One hundred and twenty thousand feet of pine lumber was used in 
these tablets alone. 

The cemetery contains fifty acres, and has been divided by one 
main avenue, running through the center, and subdivided into blocks 
and sections in such a manner that, with the aid of the record, which 
I am now having copied for the superintendent, the visitors will 
experience no difficulty in finding any grave. 

A force of men is now engaged in laying out walks and clearing the 
cemetery of stumps, prei>aratory to planting trees and flowers. 

I have already commenced the manufacture of brick, and will have 
a sufficient number by the 1st of October to pave the numerous gut- 
ters throughout the cemetery, the clay in the vicinity of the stockade 
being well adapted for the purpose of brickmaking. 

Appropriate inscriptions are placed through the ground, and I have 
endeavored, as far as my facilities would permit, to transfer this wide, 
unmarked, and unhonored grave-yard into a fit place of interment for 
the Nation's gallant dead. 

At the entrance the words ^'National Cemetery, Andersonville, 
6a.," designate the city of the dead. 

On the morning of the 17th of August, at sunrise, the Stars and 
Stripes were hoisted in the center of the cemetery, when a national 
salute was fired and several national songs suns by those present. 

The men who accomi>anied me and to whom I am indebted for the 
early completion of my mission worked zealously and faithfully from 
early in the morning until late at night, although suffering intensely 
from the effects of heat. Unacclimated as they were, one after 
another was taken sick with the fever incident to the country, and in a 
brief period my force of mechanics was considerably lessened, obliging 
me to obtain others from the residents in different parts of the State. 
All my men, however, recovered, with the exception of Mr. Eddy 
Watts, a letterer, who died on the 16th of July of typhoid fever, after 
a sickness of three weeks. I brought his body back with me and 
delivered it to his family in this city. 

Several of the U. S. cavalry detailed by General Wilson died of the 
same fever shortly after joining their command at Macon. 

Andersonville is situated on the Southwestern Railroad, sixty miles 
from Macon. There is but one house in the place, except those 
erected by the so-called Confederate Government as hospitals, officers' 
quarters, and commissary and quai'teimaster's buildings. It was 
formerly known as Anderson, but since the war the "ville" has been 
added. 

The country is covered mostly with pines and hemlocks, and the 
soil is sandy, sterile, and unfit for cultivation, and unlike the section 
of country a few miles north and south of the place, where the soil is 
well adapted for agricultural purposes. Cotton, as well as com, is 
extensively raised. 

21 R R— SBRIBS m, VOL V 



822 COBBESPONDBKCB, UTC. 

It is said to be the most unhealthy part of G^rgia, and was prob- 
ably selected as a depot for prisoners on account of this fact. At 
midday the thermometer, in the shade, reaches frequently 110^, and 
in the sun the heat is almost unbearable. 

The inhabitants of this sparsely settled locality are, with few excep- 
tions, of the most ignorant class, and from their hazard and sallow 
faces the effects of chills and fever are distinctly visible.. 

The noted prison i)en is 1,540 feet long and 750 feet wide, and con- 
tains twenty-seven acres. The dead-line is seventeen feet from the 
stockade, and the sentry boxes are thirty yards apart. The inside 
stockade is eighteen feet high, and the outer one twelve feet high, 
and the distance between the two is 120 feet. 

Nothing has been destroyed. As our exhausted, emaciated, and 
enfeebled soldiers left it, so it stands to-day as a monument to an 
inhumanity unparalled in the annals of war. 

How men could survive as well as they did in this pen, exposed to 
the rays of an almost tropical sun by day and drenching dews by 
night without the slightest covering, is wonderful. 

The ground is fiUed with the holes where they had burrowed in 
their efforts to shield themselves from the weather, and many a poor 
fellow, in endeavoring to protect himself in this manner, was smoth- 
ered to death by the earth falling in upon him. 

A veiy wortifiy man has been api)ointed superintendent of the 
grounds and cemetery, with instructions to allow no buildings or 
structures of whatever nature to be destroyed — ^particularly the 
stockade surrounding the prison pen. 

The stories told of the sufferings of our men while prisoners here 
have been substantiated by hundreds, and the skeptic who will visit 
Andersonville, even now, and examine the stockade, with its oozy 
sand, the cramx)ed and wretched burrows, the dead-line, and the slaugh- 
ter-house, must be a callous observer indeed if he is not convinced 
that the miseries depicted at this prison pen are no exaggerations. 
I have the honor to be, general, your obedient servant, 

JAMES M. MOORE, 
Captain and Assistant Quariermaster^ U. S, Army, 

No. 49. 

QUARTERMASTBR-GBNERAIi'S OFFICE, SEVENTH DIVISION, 

Washington, D. C, October 12, 1865. 
Bvt. Maj. Gen. M. 0. Meigs, 

Quartermaster-Qeneral U, S, Army: 
General: I have the honor to submit herewith a report of the 
wagons, ambulances, carts, harness, &c., pertaining to the XT. S. 
Quartermaster's Dei>artment, purchased, captured, lost, and expended 
during the fiscal years ending on the 30th of June, 1864, and 30th of 
June, 1865, so far as shown by the reports received at this office up to 
the present date. 

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

BENJ. C. CARD, 
Colonel, Quartermaster's Department, in Charge of Division. 



imiOK AUTHOBITIBS. 



323 



Rqfori of wagouB^ amtnUaneeSj eariSj hame$it Ac, , pertaining to the U. 8. Ouarter- 
master's Dj^rtment, purehaaedt eaptured, lost^ and expmded during the fiscal 
yeara endinq on the SOth of June, I864, and the SOth ofJune^ 1866, a$ ehaum by 
reports received at the Quartermaster-OeneraTe Office up to the ISth of October, 
1866, 

I.-FJ8GAL 7SAB COMMBHCIKO JULY 1, 186B. AKD BKDIKO JUKB 80, 1804. 



How 
rawlved or 



I 



! 



PnrchMad... 

Oftptared,iM 

Szpondod. 

loat^ and 



18, 868 
1,847 
8,<ttl 



877 



1,378 
845 
88 



66, lU 
6.061 
17,807 



87.480 
6.096 
16.782 



^3S6 

787 

8,468 



1,708 
406 
188 



884 

78 



IL-nSOAL YSAB CX)MHBKCINa JXTLY 1, 1864, AKD ENDING JUNE 80. 1866. 



PoMhAMd... 

Vkbrkttted... 




34 
54 

196 
516 


187 
88 
90 
88 


27 
85 

818 
961 


1.436 

'"ill 
678 


947 
78 

108 
87 


••"• 


18,915 
14,182 
6.928 
18,825 


ia.861 
20.767 
7.770 
28,264 


2,588 
088 
867 

1,588 


4 
34 

60 


825 
178 


84 


880 


OB|rtiu«d,dEo. 




46 


Szponded, 
lost, And 
•out? 




19 


489 









No. $a 

Quartbrmastbr-Gbneral's Office, Seventh Division, 

Washington, D. a, OcM>er 12, 1865. 
Bvt. Maj. Gen. M. C. Meigs, 

QwirterwosteT'Oeneral U, S. Arm/y: 

General: I have the honor to submit herewith a statement of the 

number and amount of claims received, acted upon, and remaining 

on file in the Seventh Division of this office during the fiscal year 

ending June 30, 1865, and also from July 1, 1865, to October 10, 1865: 





PiMontad. 


Approved. 


B4(Jeet6d. 


On fllefor farther 

MtlOtt. 




Kam- 
b«r. 


Amoont. 


^ 1 Amottnt. 

1 


Nam- 
ber. 


Amount. 


Num- 
ber. 


Amount. 


ItomJoljltoOeto- 
lMrlO,f860w 


0.911 
9.288 


88,060.888:50 
266,499.98 


8,410 
887 


01,179,827.22 
67,545.0] 


4,778 
1.080 


8817,58&87 
189,090.70 


1,023 

267 


070,086.41 
56,047.28 


Total 


11.484 


9.816^861.58 


4.887 


1,280,872.28 


5,887 


050.456.66 


1,200 


126,088.64 





Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

BENJ. C. CARD, 
Golonel, Quartermaster's DeparimerU, in Charge of Division. 

No. 51.* 



*For Special Orders, No. 44, Headquarters Armies of the United States, June 
2S, 1804, prescribing means of transportation, &c., see Series I, Vol. XL, Part I, 
p. 40. 



824 COBREBPONDENCE, ETC. 

No. 52. 
QnABTERMASTBB-GBNBRAL'S OFFICE, EIGHTH DIVISION, 

Washington, D. C, October 10, 1865. 
Bvt Maj. Gen. M. C. Mbigs, 

Quartermaster-Chneral U. 8. Army, Washingtoti, D, C: 

General: In consequence of my continued absence on inspection 
duty your circular of the Si4th of July, 1865, requiring from the chief 
of each division a full report of the oi>erations of his division during 
the fiscal year ending June 30, 1865, was not brought to my notice 
until yesterday, but I hope to be able to furnish all the important 
data in time to be embodied in your annual report to the Honorable 
Secretary of War. 

The act of Congress approved July 4, 1864, for the better organiza- 
tion of the Quartermasters Dei>artment, was promulgated by the War 
Department in General Orders, No. 231, July 18, 1864. 

Section 1 of the act referred to sets forth that ^'the Eighth Division 
shall have charge of all inspections of the Quartermaster's Department 
and all rei)ortsmade by officers assigned to inspection duty, analyzing 
and preserving the reports as received, and communicating through 
the Quartermaster-General to the chief of the proper division such 
portions of the reports as may be necessary for their information and 
use," with provisions for subsequent action ui)on such references. 

On the 23d of July, 1864, the Quartermaster-General submitted to 
the Adjutant-General a list of names of officers for assignment to 
duty under the aforesaid act. 

On the 6th of August following officers were assigned as chiefs of 
the divisions in the Quartermaster-General's Office, with two excep- 
tions, the Seventh and Eighth Divisions. Subsequently, on the 24th 
of August, 1864, 1 was assigned as chief of the Eighth (insx)ection) 
Division. 

Previous to this assignment I had had charge of the annual reports 
of officers, the duties connected with the assignment of officers of the 
Quartermaster's Department to duty, the duties connected with their 
changes of station, the transmission of remarks on the accounts of 
officers, personal reports, and the distribution of orders and blanks. 

Subsequent to my assignment as chief of the inspection division I 
was relieved of the transmission of remarks on accounts of officers 
and examination of monthly rex>orts. The other duties referred to I 
still continue to perform. 

Immediately after my assignment as above, to wit, on the 26th of 
August, 1864, 1 was ordered on special insi)ection duty for the War 
Department, and was absent from the Quartermaster-General's Office 
from that date until the 1st of October, 1864, when I was ordered to 
return to duty in the Quailiermaster-General's Office. 

During my absence Col. H. Biggs, inspector, Quartermaster's Depart- 
ment, acted as chief of theinsi)ection division. 

On the 14th of October, 1864, I received verbal instmctionR from 
the Secretary of War to make a series of inspections in the Deiiart- 
ment of Washington. I accordingly entered upon and continued 
upon this duty until the 20th of October, 1864, at the same time i)er- 
forming the duties of my division of the Quartermaster-General's 
Office. 

About the last of October, 1864, 1 was ordered to resume my inspec- 
tion under orders of the War Department; was absent about twenty 
days and returned to duty in the Quartermaster-General's Office. 



UNIOK AUTHOBITIEB. 325 

Dnring this absence Col. J. D. Bingham, inspector, Quartermaster's 
Department, was in charge of the Eighth Division. 

On the Idth of April, 1865, 1 left Washington on a leave of absence 
for thirty days. After enjoying ten days of my leave I noticed in a 
newspaper General Orders, No. 77, of the War Department, for the 
prompt reduction of expenses, <fec., in view of which, and believing 
my services would be more important at that than at any other time, 
I telegraphed the Quartermaster-General, prox)osing to enter upon 
duty at once, if required, and avail myself of the remainder of my 
leave some other time. He immediately ordered me upon inspection 
duty in the Northern Department with a view to curtailing exx)ense8. 

I was engaged upon inspection duty and investigations from that 
time until the 20th of August, 1865, when I returned to duty in 
charge of the insx)ection division. 

During this a^nce Ck>lonel Bingham officiated in charge of the 
inspection division. 

On the 20th of September, 1865, 1 was again ordered upon inspection 
duty in the Department of the East. I returned to duty in the 
Quartermaster-General's Office on the 7th of October, 1865. 

Of the six inspectors provided for by act of Congress approved July 
4, 1864, only four of the officers nominated by the Quartermaster- 
General on the 2dd of July, 1864, for assignment to duty as inspectors 
of the Quartermaster's Department, were so assigned on the 6th of 
August, 1864. These four were Colonels Biggs, Bingham, Cruttenden, 
and Owen. As soon as they were relieved from duty where they were 
serving at the time of such assignment three of these were ordered 
ux>on insi)ection duty, and a large number of inspections have been 
made in different parts of the United States, resulting most benefi- 
cially to the department. Concerning these inspections I shall 
remark more in detail hereinafter. 

Colonel Biggs was not ordered on insx>ecting duty, as he was detailed 
for other duty until the tender of his resignation. 

JJpon my return to the Quartermaster-General's Office, October 1, 
1864, Colonel Biggs was assigned to duty as depot quartermaster at 
Philadelphia, which position he held until February 15, 1865, when 
he was relieved, and shortly after tendered his resignation. 

It was unofficially communicated to this office that his resignation 
had been accepted, and he was not therefore assigned to duty. It 
was subsequently ascertained that his resignation had not been form- 
ally accepted. The attention of the War Department was called to 
the matter and information sought as to his status, whereux)on his 
resignation was accepted on the 11th of October, 1865. 

On the 24th of August, 1864, Capt. Gilbert A. Pierce was assigned 
as an inspector of the Quartermaster's Dei>artment, with the rank of 
colonel. 

He made several inspections in the Departments of the South and 
the Gulf. * * * He was relieved from an assignment as an inspec- 
tor of the Quartermaster's Department on the 13th of May, 1865. 

On the 30th of August, 1864, Capt. John C. Crane, assistant quarter- 
master, was assigned to duty as an inspector, Quartermaster's Depart- 
ment, with the rank of colonel, but he has never performed inspection 
duty under orders of the Quartermaster-General. 

On April 30, 1865, Capt. J. F. Rusling, assistant quartermaster, was 
assigned to duty as an insi>ector. Quartermaster's Dejiartment, with 
the rank of colonel. 



826 COBRESPONDENCE, ETC. 

He made inspections in the Department of the Tennessee and an 
investigation at Chicago, III., after which, August 2, 1865, he was 
granted a leave of absence of thirty days, at the expiration of which 
time he was ordered by the Quartermaster-General to return to Nash- 
ville on inspection duty, which order was revoked by order of the 
President September 8, 1865, and Colonel Rusling ordered to rei)ort 
to him. The latter order is still in force so far as this office is 
advised. 

On the 24th of June, 1865, Capt. R. Brinkerhoif, assistant quarter- 
master, was assigned to duty as an inspector, Quartermaster's 
Department, but on the 24th of August was ordered to report to the 
Secretary of War for special duty, upon which he is still engaged. 

The following summary will show briefly the nature of the duties 
performed by these inspectors: 

Col. J. D. Bingham, inspector, Quartermaster's Department, trans- 
mitted to this office his flrst inspection report on the 10th of Novem- 
ber, 1864, at which time he was engaged in certain investigations in the 
Department of the East. Subsequently he returned to Washington 
and was placed temporarily in charge of the inspection division dur- 
ing my absence on special duty. 

On the 27th of November, 1864, he was ordered West in connection 
with certain investigations, and was engaged on important duties 
there until the 20th of April, 1865, when he returned to Washington, 
and was again placed temporarily in charge of the Eighth Division 
during my absence West. 

On my return he was ordered to make inspections at Boston and 
New York City. 

On the 24th of September he returned to the Quartermaster-Gen- 
eral's Office and assumed temporarily the duties of the Seventh and 
Ninth Divisions, Quartermaster-General's Office, during the absence 
of Col. B. C. Card, in charge of those divisions. 

Upon Colonel Card's return he resumed his inspection duty in the 
Dei>artment of the East, and is now engaged upon these duties. 

During the fiscal year he transmitted to this office reports of eight 
inspections, and since the 1st of July, 1865, he has transmitted to this 
office the reports of four inspections. 

The reports of Colonel Bingham have been complete, f uU, and sat- 
isfactory, and the prompt, thorough, and intelligent manner with 
which he has performed the duties allotted to him is in the highest 
degree creditable to him as an officer of this department. 

Col. J. D. Cruttenden, inspector, Quartermaster's Department, was 
directed on the 17th of September, 1864, to proceed to Devall's Bluff, 
Ark., and enter upon a series of inspections in the Dei>artments of 
Arkansas, Missouri, Kentucky, Tennessee, Kansas, and Colorado. 

He was continuously employed upon such duties until August 30, 
1865, when he was granted a leave of absence by the War Dejiart- 
ment for fifteen days. 

On the 20th of September, 1865, he was directed to proceed upon 
another tour of inspections comprising the District of the Plains and 
Utah. 

The total number of reports received from him during the fiscal 
year is fifteen, and since the close of said year seven; total, twenty- 
two. 



TTNTON AUTHORITIES. S27 

Col. G. A. Pierce while Tix)on inspection duty transmitted to this 
office reports of seventeen insx>ections. 

41 41 41 41 41 41 « 

Col. W. H. Owen was relieved from his as&ignment as inspector, 
Qnartermaster's Department, February 16, 1865. He made inspec- 
tions in the Departments of Missouri, Ohio, and the Middle Depart- 
ment. He transmitted to this office sixteen reports. 

« 41 « 41 41 41 41 

Col. James F. Rusling, inspector. Quartermaster's Department, has 
made three reports, one of them during the fiscal year, the other 
two since the 1st of July, 1865. 

Those rex)ort8 are very voluminous, numbering in the aggregate 
452 i>age8. 

« 41 41 41 41 41 41 

During the fiscal year I transmitted to the Quartermaster-General's 
Office reports of sev